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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Experiences of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) linked to nutritional health: Racialized immigrants, women and those living in poverty and chronic pain also had a higher prevalence of the disorder
A study of factors associated with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) has led to a number of novel findings linking nutrition to experiences of PTSD. Notable among them is the discovery that Canadians, between the ages of 45 and 85, were less likely to exhibit PTSD if they consumed an average of two to three fiber sources daily. "It is possible that optimal levels of dietary fiber have some type of mental health-related protective effect," says Karen Davison, Director of the Nutrition ...
University of Toronto - 2/3/2021


US adults report highest stress level since early days of the COVID-19 pandemic: More than 80% report emotions associated with prolonged stress, says post-inauguration Stress in America survey
As the U.S. confronts a bitter election season, political unrest and violence, a shaky economy, and a soaring death toll due to COVID-19, 84% of U.S. adults say the country has serious societal issues that we need to address, according to a new poll. At the same time, 9 in 10 adults say they hope that the country moves toward unity, according to Stress in AmericaTM: January 2021 Stress Snapshot, conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of the American Psychological Association.
American Psychological Association - 2/2/2021


Why do psychiatric drugs help some, but not others? Study offers clues -- Protein key for learning, memory behaves differently in males than females
When it comes to developing drugs for mental illnesses, three confounding challenges exist: Men and women experience them differently, with things like depression and anxiety far more common in females. A drug that works for one person may not work for another, and side effects abound. New CU Boulder research, published in the journal eLIfe, sheds light on one reason those individual differences may exist. Turns out a key protein in the brain called AKT may function differently in ...
University of Colorado at Boulder - 2/1/2021


Study: Negative mental health effects of pandemic lockdowns spike, then fade
Absent a widely available vaccine, mitigation measures such as stay-at-home mandates, lockdowns or shelter-in-place orders have been the major public health policies deployed by state governments to curb the spread of COVID-19. But given the uncertain duration of such policies, questions have been raised about the potential negative mental health consequences of extended lockdowns with indefinite end dates. But according to new research co-written by a team of University of ...
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau - 1/25/2021


Preventing loneliness in children of depressed mothers may reduce adolescent suicidality
Children of mothers experiencing depressive symptoms are more at risk, as adolescents, of experiencing suicidal thoughts and attempting suicide. New research suggests that this link may be explained by loneliness, potentially opening new ways for youth suicide prevention. The study - by the universities of Exeter, Montréal, Laval and McGill - used data from more than 1,600 families from the Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development, a representative sample of new-borns in ...
University of Exeter - 1/25/2021


Depression in new fathers connected to relationship insecurities
Becoming a parent often brings great joy, but not always. Parenthood also entails challenges, stress and, for some people, it can trigger depression. A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that male postnatal depression is more common in men who are insecure in their relationship with their partner. Depression affects around 10-12 per cent of new mothers, and at least 8 per cent of new fathers. The figures are even higher when looking at depressive symptoms; as many as ...
Lund University - 1/22/2021


PTSD link to pandemic panic: Global study measures responses from 1040 people
Even at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic last year, people around the world became more fearful of what could happen to them or their family. A new Flinders University study of 1040 online participants from five western countries published in PLOS ONE explores people's response to the stresses of the escalating pandemic, finding more than 13% of the sample had post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related symptoms consistent with levels necessary to qualify for a clinical diagnosis.
Flinders University - 1/21/2021


Age provides a buffer to pandemic's mental health impact, University of Connecticut researchers say
Older adults are managing the stress of the coronavirus pandemic better than younger adults, reporting less depression and anxiety despite also experiencing greater general concern about COVID-19, according to a study recently published by researchers at the UConn School of Nursing. Their somewhat paradoxical findings, published last month in the journal Aging and Mental Health, suggest that although greater psychological distress has been reported during the pandemic, older age may ...
University of Connecticut - 1/20/2021


Psychological well-being declined during second wave of the pandemic - especially for men
The psychological well-being of both men and women declined when Denmark closed down during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic in the spring of 2020 - with women being hit the hardest. But during the second wave, it is the other way round in terms of gender: The psychological well-being of men and women is generally low, but it has fallen most in men. This is shown in a survey conducted by Søren Dinesen Østergaard, among others. He is professor at the Department of ...
Aarhus University - 1/19/2021


Certain parenting behaviors associated with positive changes in well-being during COVID-19 pandemic
During the COVID-19 pandemic, parents have been faced with challenging circumstances to balance work, household, care of children and support of distance learning for school-age children without help from their regular support systems such as schools, childcare, and often other family members as well. A new longitudinal study in Germany examined day-to-day parenting behavior during the restrictions and closures caused by the pandemic from the end of March until the end of April 2020.
Society for Research in Child Development - 1/19/2021


Conflict between divorced parents can lead to mental health problems in children
Conflict between divorced or separated parents increases the risk of children developing physical and mental health problems. A new study from the Arizona State University Research and Education Advancing Children's Health (REACH) Institute has found that children experience fear of being abandoned when their divorced or separated parents engage in conflict. Worrying about being abandoned predicted future mental health problems in children. The work will be published in Child ...
Arizona State University - 1/12/2021


More than half of COVID-19 health care workers at risk for mental health problems
The daily toll of COVID-19, as measured by new cases and the growing number of deaths, overlooks a shadowy set of casualties: the rising risk of mental health problems among health care professionals working on the frontlines of the pandemic. A new study, led by University of Utah Health scientists, suggests more than half of doctors, nurses, and emergency responders involved in COVID-19 care could be at risk for one or more mental health problems, including acute traumatic ...
University of Utah Health - 1/12/2021


Study finds risk factors linked to COVID-19 mental health impacts for college students
A study of students at seven public universities across the United States has identified risk factors that may place students at higher risk for negative psychological impacts related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Factors associated with greater risk of negative impacts include the amount of time students spend on screens each day, their gender, age and other characteristics. Research has shown many college students faced significant mental health challenges going into the COVID-19 ...
North Carolina State University - 1/12/2021


Gut microbes may antagonize or assist in anorexia: Review highlights evidence that the microbial community in our gut may significantly contribute to anorexia and represents a new way to treat it
You are likely familiar with the serious consequences of anorexia for those who experience it, but you might not be aware that the disorder may not be purely psychological. A recent review from researchers at the University of Oxford in the open-access journal Frontiers in Psychiatry examines the evidence that gut microbes could play a significant role in anorexia by affecting appetite, weight, and psychiatric issues such as anxiety and compulsive behavior, among others. Intriguingly, the ...
Frontiers - 1/12/2021


Mindfulness can improve mental health and wellbeing -- but unlikely to work for everyone
Mindfulness courses can reduce anxiety, depression and stress and increase mental wellbeing within most but not all non-clinical settings, say a team of researchers at the University of Cambridge. They also found that mindfulness may be no better than other practices aimed at improving mental health and wellbeing. Mindfulness is typically defined as 'the awareness that emerges through paying attention on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally to the unfolding of ...
University of Cambridge - 1/11/2021


How to mitigate the impact of a lockdown on mental health
The Covid-19 pandemic is impacting people's mental health. But what helps and hinders people in getting through a lockdown? A new study led by researchers at the University of Basel addressed this question using data from 78 countries across the world. The results hint at the pivots and hinges on which the individual's psyche rests in the pandemic. At the outset of the Covid-19 pandemic, little was known about the impact of population-wide governmental lockdowns.
University of Basel - 1/7/2021


Heading outdoors keeps lockdown blues at bay: Study finds time spent outdoors is associated with higher levels of happiness
A new study has found that spending time outdoors and switching off our devices is associated with higher levels of happiness during a period of COVID-19 restrictions. Previous academic studies have indicated how being outdoors, particularly in green spaces, can improve mental health by promoting more positive body image, and lowering levels of depression and anxiety. Jointly led by academics from Anglia Ruskin University (ARU) in the UK, the Karl Landsteiner University of ...
Anglia Ruskin University - 1/7/2021


Brain imaging predicts PTSD after brain injury: Brain volume measurement may provide early biomarker
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex psychiatric disorder brought on by physical and/or psychological trauma. How its symptoms, including anxiety, depression and cognitive disturbances arise remains incompletely understood and unpredictable. Treatments and outcomes could potentially be improved if doctors could better predict who would develop PTSD. Now, researchers using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have found potential brain biomarkers of PTSD in ...
Elsevier - 12/29/2020


In shaky times, focus on past successes, if overly anxious, depressed
The more chaotic things get, the harder it is for people with clinical anxiety and/or depression to make sound decisions and to learn from their mistakes. On a positive note, overly anxious and depressed people's judgment can improve if they focus on what they get right, instead of what they get wrong, suggests a new UC Berkeley study. The findings, published today, Dec. 22, in the journal eLife, are particularly salient in the face of a COVID-19 surge that demands tactical and ...
University of California - Berkeley - 12/22/2020


COVID-19 isolation hurting women more than men: Researchers publish study showing differences in sleep quality, empathy and mood
A study by University of Calgary researchers with the Hotchkiss Brain Institute examining sex and gender differences on sleep, empathy and mood during months of isolation due to COVID-19 has found that women are suffering more than men with poorer sleep and more anxiety, depression and trauma, while also feeling more empathetic than men. The findings published in Frontiers in Global Women's Health is one of the first studies to look at changes in mood and sleep quality during ...
University of Calgary - 12/22/2020


How to be happier in 2021: Toss out your usual list of New Year's resolutions and do things that make the world a better place
So you want to look trimmer, be smarter, and successful next year? You strive to exercise and call your friends more, and spend less? You are not alone. New Year's resolutions are as ubiquitous as they are difficult to keep. Does it even make sense to set such lofty goals for the new year, hoping anew each January first that this time really is the charm? Any motivational researcher would have "ambivalent feelings" about New Year's resolutions, says Richard Ryan, an international expert ...
University of Rochester - 12/21/2020


Healthcare workers have increased insomnia, risk of severe mental health problems: COVID-19 study
Researchers at the University of Ottawa have found the mental health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have particularly impacted healthcare professionals and their sleep, putting these frontline workers at risk of severe future mental health problems. Jude Mary Cénat, an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Social Sciences' School of Psychology, and his team conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of 55 global studies involving nearly 190,000 participants for 'Prevalence of ...
University of Ottawa - 12/17/2020


Researchers discover brain pattern that could improve mental health disorder diagnosis
A pattern in how the brain breaks down tryptophan, a common amino acid consumed through food, was discovered by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The finding, which could help physicians more accurately diagnose and treat several major mental health disorders, was recently published in Molecular Psychiatry. "Tryptophan can be metabolized to either a route where serotonin is produced, or to the kynurenine pathway," said ...
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston - 12/17/2020


Neurotic people feel worse emotionally during the corona crisis: Psychologists study personality and well-being during the pandemic
When the corona pandemic began in March, it fundamentally changed many people's everyday lives. A normal working day, vibrant public life, carefree social contacts - all these things now seem like a memory from another age. In order to find out what effects these restrictions are having on people's emotional well-being, the researchers carried out a survey on how people dealt with the pandemic. "Our analyses showed that most people have been doing relatively well during these times," ...
University of Münster - 12/17/2020


UC Study: Suicide watch more important now than ever: Researchers show that self-harm was on the rise, even without the added stressors of a pandemic
A recent study by a team of University of Cincinnati researchers shows that suicide planning, attempts and completions were already on the rise pre-COVID-19. Add a pandemic to a holiday season, when depression and suicide are typically higher among both adolescents and adults, and the last couple of weeks of 2020 may be a time to be on even higher alert. According to health data, nearly 1.5 million Americans attempt suicide each year. "It's just unbelievable to me how we are not ...
University of Cincinnati - 12/16/2020


Career thoughts and parental relationships in adolescents with ADHD
A new study published in The Career Development Quarterly looked for potential links between negative or dysfunctional career thoughts and the quality of parental relationships in high school students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In the study of 102 adolescents (76 boys, 26 girls) with ADHD, male participants' dysfunctional career thoughts were related to their relationships with their mothers. Those who had positive relationships with their mothers exhibited less ...
Wiley - 12/7/2020


Building resiliency in children as the COVID-19 pandemic continues through the holidays
Seasons of change can be difficult to navigate emotionally, not only for adults, but also for children. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has undoubtedly impacted children's mental health, and as families start planning for the holidays that may look very different this year, it's important to build resilience in kids to prepare them for what's ahead during these winter months. A new survey by Nationwide Children's Hospital found two-thirds of parents worry the effects of the pandemic on ...
Nationwide Children's Hospital - 12/2/2020


Major depressive disorder may be defined by a distinct gut microbiome: Landscapes of bacterial and metabolic signatures and their interaction in major depressive disorders
Scientists have identified 3 bacteriophages, 47 bacterial species, and 50 fecal metabolites that were significantly more or less abundant in people with major depressive disorder (MDD) compared with healthy controls, according to a study in 311 individuals. The findings provide evidence that MDD may be characterized by gut microbiome disturbances. Jian Yang and colleagues also developed a marker panel based on the bacterial, viral, and metabolic MDD signatures they uncovered, ...
American Association for the Advancement of Science - 12/2/2020


How Are Older Adults Coping With the Mental Health Effects of COVID-19? Analysis reveals resilience in many individuals and what factors may be driving it
Older adults are especially vulnerable to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic—with higher risks of severe complications and death, and potentially greater difficulties accessing care and adapting to technologies such as telemedicine. A viewpoint article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association notes that there’s also a concern that isolation during the pandemic could be more difficult for older individuals, which could exacerbate existing mental health conditions.
McLean Hospital - 12/1/2020


In a holiday season unlike any other, avoid unfounded claims about suicide: The suicide rate usually drops at holiday time
The holiday season usually has the lowest monthly suicide rates. And while the COVID-19 pandemic has increased risk factors associated with suicide, the media and the public should be careful this holiday season not to make unfounded claims about suicide trends. Last year, during the holidays and before the pandemic, about half of the newspaper stories that connected the holidays and suicide contained misinformation falsely perpetuating the myth that suicide increases over the holidays, ...
Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania - 12/1/2020


Pets, touch and COVID-19: why our furry friends are lifesavers
Lockdowns, job losses and social isolation have been the hallmarks of 2020 as COVID-19 tightens its grip on the world, not only infecting millions and leaving a mounting death toll, but also denying humans the most basic sense - touch. In the absence of human-to-human contact, in millions of households worldwide, animals have stepped into the breach for many people, providing much-needed comfort via cuddles, pats and a constant physical presence. A new study published by University of ...
University of South Australia - 12/1/2020


Mothers' stress may lead to preterm births, faster aging in children: Two UCLA studies reveal how stress before and during pregnancy may adversely affect offspring
Why do some people age faster than others? One potential answer, a new UCLA-led study indicates, is that a mother's stress prior to giving birth may accelerate her child's biological aging. The researchers found evidence that maternal stress adversely affects the length of a baby's telomeres -- the small pieces of DNA at the ends of chromosomes that act as protective caps, like the plastic tips on shoelaces. Shortened telomeres have been linked to a higher risk of cancers, cardiovascular and ...
University of California - Los Angeles - 11/30/2020


Measuring broken hearts: divorce has negative effects on physical and mental health: Study measures effects immediately after divorce and is the first to show that higher conflict levels predict worse mental health regardless of other factors
Going through a divorce is extremely challenging and previous research has highlighted the adverse effects that it can have on divorcees. A recent study in open-access journal Frontiers in Psychology is the first to examine health impacts immediately after a divorce. The study found that the mental and physical health of recent divorcees was worse than that of the background population and that higher levels of conflict predicted worse mental health, regardless of other factors.
Frontiers - 11/30/2020


Loneliness in youth could impact mental health over the long term: Children and adolescents more likely to experience higher rates of depression and anxiety during and after enforced isolation ends
The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated widespread social isolation, affecting all ages of global society. A new rapid review in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports on the available evidence about children and young people specifically, stating that loneliness is associated with mental health problems, including depression and anxiety-potentially affecting them years later.
Elsevier - 11/19/2020


Being alone and socializing with others each contributes differently to personal growth
How do people experience time alone and time with others? Findings from a new Bar-Ilan University study reveal the intricacies of people's experiences in these basic social conditions. The study used a unique approach of analyzing self-generated text from more than 1,700 participants who performed a sentence-completion task regarding their experience alone and their social experience when in the company of others. This approach shed light on people's perceptions when free to express ...
Bar-Ilan University - 11/19/2020


Suicidal risk during pregnancy, after childbirth on the rise
Pregnancy and the period after delivering a baby can be one of the riskiest times for depressive symptoms, with suicide among the leading causes of death among new moms. And now a new study suggests that suicide "near misses" during pregnancy and after childbirth are increasing. The prevalence of suicidal thoughts and self-harm in the year before and after giving birth nearly tripled among childbearing people between 2006 and 2017, according to the findings in JAMA Psychiatry.
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan - 11/18/2020


'Alarming' COVID-19 study shows 80% of respondents report significant symptoms of depression: Young adults across the US took part in loneliness study
A new national survey, looking at how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted young US adults' loneliness, reveals "significant depressive symptoms" in 80% of participants. Over 1,000 Americans aged 18-35 took part in the online anonymous questionnaire, which also asked the subjects to report on their anxiety and substance use. The analysed findings, published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, show that "alarming" levels of loneliness are associated with ...
Taylor & Francis Group - 11/16/2020


Suffering in silence: two-thirds of older adults say they won't treat their depression: New nationwide poll shows 1 in 3 respondents age 65+ think they can just "snap out of it"
A new nationwide poll, the GeneSight Mental Health Monitor, shows that nearly two-thirds (61%) of Americans age 65 or older who have concerns about having depression will not seek treatment. In fact, nearly 1 in 3 (33%) seniors who are concerned they might be suffering from depression believe they can "snap out" of it on their own. "The 'pull yourself up by your bootstraps' mindset of some seniors and reluctance to talk about mental health are hindering them from getting the help they need ...
GeneSight Mental Health Monitor - 11/16/2020


Burnout can exacerbate work stress, further promoting a vicious circle: Work stress and burnout are mutually reinforcing; surprisingly, the effect of work stress on burnout is much smaller than the effect of burnout on work stress
Stress and overload in the workplace are increasing worldwide and are often considered a cause of burnout. Indeed, a new study shows that work stress and burnout are mutually reinforcing. However, contrary to popular belief, burnout has a much greater impact on work stress than vice versa. "This means that the more severe a person's burnout becomes, the more stressed they will feel at work, such as being under time pressure, for example," said Professor Christian Dormann of ...
Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz - 11/10/2020


Loneliness a leading cause of depression in older adults
Loneliness is responsible for 18% of depression among people over 50 in England, according to a new study led by UCL researchers. The findings, published in The Lancet Psychiatry, suggest that almost one in five depression cases among older adults could be prevented if loneliness were eliminated. The researchers found that people's subjective experiences of loneliness contributed to depression up to 12 years later, independent of more objective measures of social isolation.
University College London - 11/9/2020



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