Find a Therapist at

Find a Therapist or Treatment Center

   for Consumers
Find a Therapist
Find a Treatment Center
About Therapy
Research a Condition
Research a Medication
Support Groups
National Hotlines
Featured Articles
What's New

   for Providers
List Your Practice
List Your Treatment Center
Publish an Article
My Account

Therapist Index: Find a Therapist by Location
   Find a Therapist by City
   Find a Therapist by State

Topic Index
   Conditions A to Z
Acute Stress
Adjustment Disorder
Alzheimer's Disease
Amnestic Disorders
Amphetamine Depen.
Antisocial Personality
Asperger Syndrome
Avoidant Personality
Binge Eating Disorder
Bipolar Disorder
Body Dysmorphia
Borderline Personality
Brief Psychotic Dis.
Cannabis Dependence
Child Abuse
Chronic Tics
Circadian Rhythm Dis.
Cocaine Dependence
Conduct Disorder
Conversion Disorder
Delusional Disorder
Dependent Personality
Dissociative Amnesia
Dissociative Fugue
Dissociative Identity
Domestic Violence
Elder Abuse
Expressive Lang. Dis.
Factitious Disorder
Feeding Disorder
Female Orgasmic Dis.
Gender Identity Dis.
Generalized Anxiety
Hallucinogen Depen.
Histrionic Personality
Inhalant Dependence
Male Erectile Disorder
Male Orgasmic Dis.
Mathematics Disorder
Mental Retardation
Narcissistic Personality
Nicotine Dependence
Nightmare Disorder
Opioid Dependence
Oppositional Defiant
Pain Disorder
Panic Disorder
Paranoid Personality
Pathological Gambling
Phencyclidine Depen.
Phonological Disorder
Postpartum Depression
Premature Ejaculation
Primary Hypersomnia
Primary Insomnia
Reactive Attachment
Reading Disorder
Restless Legs Synd.
Rett Syndrome
Rumination Disorder
Schizoaffective Dis.
Schizoid Personality
Schizophreniform Dis.
Schizotypal Personality
Sedative Dependence
Selective Mutism
Separation Anxiety
Sexual Abuse
Sexual Arousal Dis.
Sexual Aversion Dis.
Sexual Desire Dis.
Sexual Masochism
Sexual Sadism
Shared Psychotic Dis.
Sleep Apnea
Sleep Terror
Social Phobia
Specific Phobia
Stereotypic Movement
Tourette Syndrome
Transient Tics
Transvestic Fetishism
   Medications A to Z

Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
«  Previous    1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20    Next Page  »
Traumatic stress may affect DNA, but psychotherapy may heal it
A study published in Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics for the first time demonstrates that traumatic stress may induce DNA breakage, but psychotherapy may heal it. Previous research reveals an association between traumatic stress and an increased risk for numerous diseases, including cancer. At the molecular level, stress may increase carcinogenesis via increased DNA damage and impaired DNA repair mechanisms.
Medical News Today - 10/27/2014

PET scans reveal how psychodynamic therapy for depression may change brain function: Metabolic differences in key brain region could predict which patients are most likely to respond to psychodynamic therapy
A study from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has identified for the first time changes in the metabolic activity of a key brain region in patients successfully treated for depression with psychodynamic psychotherapy, suggesting a mechanism of action behind one of the most historically important and widely practiced forms of therapy. They also found evidence that pretreatment metabolism in a different brain structure might predict which patients ...
EurekAlert - 10/27/2014

Dark Days Here for Folks With Seasonal Depression: Expert offers tips to compensate for reduced light exposure
October's shorter, darker days can trigger a type of depression, known as seasonal affective disorder, according to an expert. People affected by seasonal affective disorder, also called SAD, may feel overly tired, lack motivation and even have trouble getting out of bed. In extreme cases, SAD can lead to suicide, said Dr. Angelos Halaris, a professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences at Loyola University Chicago Stitch School of Medicine.
HealthDay - 10/24/2014

Relationships benefit when parents, adult children use multiple communication channels
Adult children's relationship satisfaction with their parents is modestly influenced by the number of communication tools, such as cell phones, email, social networking sites, they use to communicate, research has found.
ScienceDaily - 10/24/2014

Music therapy reduces depression in children, adolescents
Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have discovered that music therapy reduces depression in children and adolescents with behavioral and emotional problems. In the largest ever study of its kind, the researchers in partnership with the Northern Ireland Music Therapy Trust, found that children who received music therapy had significantly improved self-esteem and significantly reduced depression compared with those who received treatment without music therapy.
ScienceDaily - 10/23/2014

Two days later: Adolescents' conflicts with family spill over to school, vice versa
Family conflict and problems at school tend to occur together on the same day. A new study has found that these problems spill over in both directions for up to two days after. The study found that teens with more pronounced mental health symptoms, anxiety and depression, for example, are at risk for intensified spillover. The study followed over a hundred 13 to 17 year olds and their parents over a 14-day period.
ScienceDaily - 10/23/2014

Exposure therapy appears helpful in treating patients with prolonged grief
Cognitive behavioral therapy with exposure therapy (CBT/exposure), where patients relive the experience of a death of a loved one, resulted in greater reductions in measures of prolonged grief disorder (PGD) than CBT alone. PGD involves persistent yearning for the deceased and the associated emotional pain, difficulty in accepting the death, a sense of meaninglessness, bitterness about the death and difficulty in engaging in new activities. To diagnose PGD, ...
ScienceDaily - 10/22/2014

Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level: Tiny structures found in brain synapses help scientists better understand disorder
A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine® scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness. Scientists used a new super-resolution imaging method -- the same method recognized with the 2014 Nobel Prize in chemistry -- to peer deep into brain tissue from mice with bipolar-like behaviors. In the synapses (where communication between brain cells occurs), they discovered ...
Northwestern University - 10/22/2014

U.S. Kids Use ADHD Meds More During School Year: Researchers suggest this may be to boost academic achievement
American children's use of stimulant medications is 30 percent higher during the school year than in the summer, a new study indicates. The findings suggest that many children may use stimulants to help them meet academic demands, according to the researchers. Stimulant medications improve concentration and help manage symptoms associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). They are the most widely used type of medication among ...
HealthDay - 10/17/2014

Upbeat Walking Style Might Lift Your Mood: Negativity less likely in people with a positive gait, study says
The way you walk can affect your mood, according to a new study. Previous research has shown that depressed people move differently from happy people, according to study co-author Nikolaus Troje, a senior fellow at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. "It is not surprising that our mood, the way we feel, affects how we walk, but we want to see whether the way we move also affects how we feel," he said in an institute news release.
HealthDay - 10/17/2014

Family Acceptance Key to Curbing Teen Suicides, Study Shows: Validation by peers also decreased likelihood of self-harm
Family rejection could be potentially deadly for teens already at risk for suicide, a new study has found. When teens were followed six months after discharge from a psychiatric unit for attempting suicide, the majority of boys and girls reported feeling family or peer "invalidation" at the time of discharge. "Family invalidation refers to a lack of acceptance of individuals' sense of self and their emotions," said lead researcher Shirley Yen, an associate professor of ...
HealthDay - 10/17/2014

Youth suicide: More early detection, better coordination are needed
Although progress has been made in recent years, the matter of youth suicide in Quebec still needs to be more effectively addressed. In fact, a new study shows that more lives could be saved through early detection and increased public awareness and information sharing among professionals.
ScienceDaily - 10/16/2014

Obesity and Depression Often Twin Ills, Study Finds: Nature of connection isn't clear, but both conditions can be treated, experts say
Depression and obesity tend to go hand in hand, U.S. health officials reported Thursday. The combination was so common that 43 percent of depressed adults were also obese, according to the report. That association was even more prevalent among those taking antidepressants: 55 percent of those patients were also obese.
HealthDay - 10/16/2014

More Evidence That Exercise May Help Fight Depression: But low mood can be a barrier to physical activity, study finds
Physically active people are less likely to show signs of depression, a new study finds. And exercise can help improve mood in people who already feel depressed, but there's a catch: Depressive symptoms appear to be a barrier to physical activity, the British researchers said. The findings, based on 11,000 adults ages 23 to 50, correlate with previous research suggesting that exercise can have a powerful effect on depression, although it's far from a cure-all.
HealthDay - 10/16/2014

Testing parents' patience, while treating kids' problem behavior
Humans have a focus on the short term. We are more interested in a potential benefit if we can get it now. The ability to delay gratification has been studied in children with the “marshmallow experiment”: a child can have one treat now, or two if he or she can wait a few minutes without gobbling the first treat. Psychologists and economists have shown that similar trends can be observed and measured in many spheres of life. They call the tendency for the perceived value ...
Emory Health Sciences - 10/14/2014

In-home visits reduce drug use, depression in pregnant teens
Intensive parenting and health education provided in homes of pregnant American Indian teens reduced the mothers’ illegal drug use, depression and behavior problems, and set their young children on track to meet behavioral and emotional milestones they may have otherwise missed.
ScienceDaily - 10/10/2014

Teenage Girls Are Exposed to More Stressors that Increase Depression Risk
Adolescence is often a turbulent time, and it is marked by substantially increased rates of depressive symptoms, especially among girls. New research indicates that this gender difference may be the result of girls’ greater exposure to stressful interpersonal events, making them more likely to ruminate, and contributing to their risk of depression.
Association for Psychological Science - 10/8/2014

Childhood psychological abuse as harmful as sexual or physical abuse
Children who are emotionally abused and neglected face similar and sometimes worse mental health problems as children who are physically or sexually abused, yet psychological abuse is rarely addressed in prevention programs or in treating victims, according to a new study.
ScienceDaily - 10/8/2014

Gay and Bisexual Youth Can Thrive With Positive Family Relationships
Gay and bisexual youth who are supported by their family and feel comfortable talking to them about their lives are less likely to become involved in high-risk sexual behaviors, according to a recent Rutgers study. “Youth had limited engagement in unsafe sex when the families were able to have open, reciprocal discussions that were low in disagreement. Close family connections seemed to provide a context for safety,” says Michael LaSala, associate professor and ...
Rutgers University - 10/7/2014

Childhood eating difficulties could be a sign of underlying psychological issues
Researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children's hospital are warning parents that difficult eaters could have underlying psychological issues, as they have found that restrictive behaviors can appear before puberty.
EurekAlert - 10/7/2014

Why do women struggling with low sexual desire not seek treatment?
Low sexual desire is common among both pre- and post-menopausal women. It can cause personal distress, harm relationships, and have a negative impact on body image and self confidence. Yet few women seek medical care for this condition, and the reasons are explored in a timely article in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
EurekAlert - 10/7/2014

‘Broad Consensus’ that Violent Media Increase Child Aggression: Agreement found among researchers, pediatricians and parents
Majorities of media researchers, parents and pediatricians agree that exposure to violent media can increase aggression in children, according to a new national study. The study found that 66 percent of researchers, 67 percent of parents and 90 percent of pediatricians agree or strongly agree that violent video games can increase aggressive behavior among children. Majorities of these groups also believed that children’s aggressive behavior can be ...
Ohio State University - 10/6/2014

Weight-Loss Surgery May Not Always Help With Depression: About 4 percent of obese patients report negative mood changes months after procedure, study finds
While most severely obese people get a mood boost after weight-loss surgery, some may have a recurrence of depression symptoms months after they have the procedure, a new study finds. The study included 94 women and 13 men who were asked about their mood before having weight-loss surgery, and again six and 12 months after the procedure.
HealthDay - 10/3/2014

Sense of invalidation uniquely risky for troubled teens
A study of 99 teens hospitalized out of concern about suicide risk found that a high perception of family invalidation – or lack of acceptance – predicted future suicide events among boys, and peer invalidation predicted future self harm, such as cutting, among the teens in general.
Brown University - 10/2/2014

Mini-Strokes May Lead to PTSD, Study Finds: Fear, depression and anxiety might follow a transient ischemic attack, researchers say
A mini-stroke may not cause lasting physical damage, but it could increase your risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a small, new study suggests. Almost one-third of patients who suffered a mini-stroke -- known as a transient ischemic attack (TIA) -- developed symptoms of PTSD, including depression, anxiety and reduced quality of life, the researchers said.
HealthDay - 10/2/2014

Strong working memory puts brakes on problematic drug use: University of Oregon-led team finds that impulsive adolescents who lack focus are more likely to face substance-abuse issues
Adolescents with strong working memory are better equipped to escape early drug experimentation without progressing into substance abuse issues, says a University of Oregon researcher. Most important in the picture is executive attention, a component of working memory that involves a person's ability to focus on a task and ignore distractions while processing relevant goal-oriented information, says Atika Khurana, a professor in the Department of Counseling ...
EurekAlert - 10/2/2014

Many Kids With ADHD May Be Missing Out on Talk Therapy: Study finds just one in four taking medication gets additional treatment
Only one of four American children who has health insurance and has been prescribed medication to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) also receives some form of talk therapy, according to a new study. The findings raise concerns that doctors may just be prescribing pills for behavior problems, rather than targeting kids' specific difficulties through judicious use of medication and therapy, said lead author Dr. Walid Gellad, an adjunct scientist at ...
HealthDay - 9/25/2014

Special Therapy May Help Relieve 'Complicated Grief': Standard depression treatment is less successful after a loved one dies, study finds
For people mired in grief after a loved one's death, a specially designed therapy may work better than a standard treatment for depression, a new study finds. The debilitating condition, known as complicated grief, is often mistaken for depression, but is a different problem altogether, researchers say. Sufferers from complicated grief have intense yearning and longing for the person who died that doesn't lessen over time.
HealthDay - 9/25/2014

How physical exercise protects the brain from stress-induced depression
Physical exercise has many beneficial effects on human health, including the protection from stress-induced depression. However, until now the mechanisms that mediate this protective effect have been unknown. In a new study in mice, researchers show that exercise training induces changes in skeletal muscle that can purge the blood of a substance that accumulates during stress, and is harmful to the brain.
ScienceDaily - 9/25/2014

Perfectionism is a bigger than perceived risk factor in suicide: Psychology expert
Experts are calling for closer attention to perfectionism's potential destructiveness, adding that clinical guidelines should include perfectionism as a separate factor for suicide risk assessment and intervention. 'There is an urgent need for looking at perfectionism with a person-centered approach as an individual and societal risk factor, when formulating clinical guidelines for suicide risk assessment and intervention, as well as public health approaches to ...
ScienceDaily - 9/25/2014

Walking off depression and beating stress outdoors? Nature group walks linked to improved mental health
They are common suggestions to remedy stress: You just need a breath of fresh air. Walk it off. Get out and see people. Turns out all those things combined may in fact make you feel better – a lot better – a new large scale study suggests. Group nature walks are linked with significantly lower depression, less perceived stress and enhanced mental health and well-being, according to the study conducted by the University of Michigan, with partners from ...
University of Michigan Health System - 9/23/2014

Fruit and vegetable consumption could be as good for your mental as your physical health
New research focused on mental wellbeing found that high and low mental wellbeing were consistently associated with an individual's fruit and vegetable consumption. 33.5% of respondents with high mental wellbeing ate five or more portions of fruit and vegetables a day, compared with only 6.8% who ate less than one portion.
ScienceDaily - 9/23/2014

Hold on, tiger mom: Punitive parenting may lead to mental health risks
Less supportive and punitive parenting techniques used by some Chinese parents might lead to the development of low self-esteem and school adjustment difficulties in their children and leave them vulnerable to depression and problem behaviors, according to a paper.
ScienceDaily - 9/22/2014

Sibling bullying linked to later depression, self-harm
A new study has found that children who revealed they had been bullied by their brothers or sisters several times a week or more during early adolescence were twice as likely to report being clinically depressed as young adults. They were also twice as likely to say they had self-harmed within the previous year compared with those who had not been bullied.
ScienceDaily - 9/19/2014

Domestic violence likely more frequent for same-sex couples: Extra stress in same-sex couples may raise risk of domestic abuse
Domestic violence occurs at least as frequently, and likely even more so, between same-sex couples compared to opposite-sex couples, according to a new review of research. Abuse is underreported in same-sex couples due to the stigma of sexual orientation, researchers note.
Northwestern University - 9/19/2014

One Dose of Antidepressant Changes Brain Connections, Study Says: Researchers eventually hope to predict who will respond to a drug and who won't
Just a single dose of a common antidepressant can quickly alter the way brain cells communicate with one another, early research suggests. The findings, reported online Sept. 18 in Current Biology, are a step toward better understanding the brain's response to widely prescribed antidepressants. Experts said the hope is to eventually be able to predict which people with depression are likely to benefit from a drug -- and which people would fare better with a different option.
HealthDay - 9/18/2014

Size at birth affects risk of adolescent mental health disorders
New research from the Copenhagen Centre for Social Evolution and Yale University offers compelling support for the general evolutionary theory that birth weight and -length can partially predict the likelihood of being diagnosed with mental health disorders such as autism and schizophrenia later in life. The study analyzed medical records of 1.75 million Danish births, and subsequent hospital diagnoses for up to 30 years, and adjusted for almost all ...
Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen - 9/17/2014

Survey finds benefits, risks of yoga for bipolar disorder
Newly published results from a survey of people with bipolar disorder who practice yoga have begun to document the reported benefits and risks of the practice. The information, plus a pilot clinical trial currently underway, could help psychologists develop yoga as an adjunctive therapy for the condition.
Brown University - 9/17/2014

PTSD symptoms associated with increased food addiction
Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were associated with increased food addiction, especially when individuals had more symptoms or the symptoms occurred earlier in life.
EurekAlert - 9/17/2014

First blood test to diagnose depression in adults: Test identifies 9 blood markers tied to depression; predicts who will benefit from therapy
The first blood test to diagnose major depression in adults has been developed by Northwestern Medicine® scientists, a breakthrough approach that provides the first objective, scientific diagnosis for depression. The test identifies depression by measuring the levels of nine RNA blood markers. RNA molecules are the messengers that interpret the DNA genetic code and carry out its instructions.
EurekAlert - 9/16/2014

«  Previous    1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20    Next Page  »

Home  |  Provider Directory  |  Mental Health Library  |  Resource Center  |  For Providers
Find a Therapist  |  Find a Treatment Center  |  List Your Practice  |  List Your Treatment Center
About Us  |  Contact Us  |  User Agreement  |  Privacy Policy  |  Site Map
This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here. The information provided on this site is for educational or informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical or behavioral health care advice. The information is not intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care provider. Please consult your health care provider if you have any questions or concerns about your health.
Copyright © 2000-2018, Inc. All rights reserved.
Welcome Guestbook What's New Site Map Find a Therapist Find a Treatment Center About Therapy Frequently Asked Questions Disorders & Conditions Medications Treatment Approaches Featured Articles News Archive Mental Health Dictionary Support Groups National Hotlines Web Directory Mental Health Books Related Web Sites For Providers Provider Login Back to top of page