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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Older Adults’ Abstract Reasoning Ability Predicts Depressive Symptoms Over Time
Age-related declines in abstract reasoning ability predict increasing depressive symptoms in subsequent years, according to data from a longitudinal study of older adults in Scotland. The research is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. “Mental health in later life is a topic of increasing importance given aging populations worldwide,” says researcher Stephen Aichele of the University of Geneva. “Our findings suggest that monitoring ...
Association for Psychological Science - 11/14/2018


Bias-Based Bullying Does More Harm, Is Harder to Protect Against
A new study finds that bias-based bullying does more harm to students than generalized bullying, particularly for students who are targeted because of multiple identities, such as race and gender. What’s more, the study finds that efforts to mitigate these harms are less effective against bias-based bullying. “Bias-based bullying is when children are bullied because of some aspect of their social identity, whether that’s race, gender, ethnicity, religion, disability or sexual orientation,” ...
North Carolina State University - 11/14/2018


Being overweight likely to cause depression, even without health complications
The research, jointly led by the University of Exeter and the University of South Australia, suggests that it is the psychological impact of being overweight that causes depression, rather than associated illnesses. This furthers understanding of the complex relationship between obesity and depression. While it has long been known that depression is more common in obesity, the research, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, is the first to conclude that higher body mass ...
University of Exeter - 11/13/2018


Brain changes found in self-injuring teen girls: Study highlights need for prevention, early intervention in those at high risk of suicide
The brains of teenage girls who engage in serious forms of self-harm, including cutting, show features similar to those seen in adults with borderline personality disorder, a severe and hard-to-treat mental illness, a new study has found. Reduced brain volumes seen in these girls confirms biological - and not just behavioral - changes and should prompt additional efforts to prevent and treat self-inflicted injury, a known risk factor for suicide, said study lead author Theodore Beauchaine, ...
Ohio State University - 11/13/2018


Suicide risk increases in teens who knew murder victims
Nearly half of black teenagers surveyed in Allegheny County report losing a friend or family member to murder, a disproportionately stark statistic that is associated with suicide attempts and other negative childhood experiences, according to research led by UPMC and University of Pittsburgh scientists. The findings are presented today at the American Public Health Association's 2018 Annual Meeting & Expo in San Diego. "Health Equity Now" is the theme of this year's meeting.
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences - 11/13/2018


Double whammy for grieving spouses with sleep problems: Bereaved spouses with sleep disturbances have overactive immune system linked to heart disease
Sleep disturbances have a strong negative impact on the immune system of people who have recently lost a spouse, reports a new study from Northwestern Medicine and Rice University. The overactivated immune system of the bereaved triggered by sleep disturbances -- and resulting chronic inflammation -- may make them more susceptible to heart disease or cancer, the study authors said. Grieving spouses have a higher risk of developing heart disease or dying within a year of their ...
Northwestern University - 11/8/2018


Social media use increases depression and loneliness: In the first experimental study of Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram use, University of Pennsylvania psychologist showed a causal link between time spent on the platforms and decreased well-being
The link between the two has been talked about for years, but a causal connection had never been proven. For the first time, University of Pennsylvania research based on experimental data connects Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram use to decreased well-being. Psychologist Melissa G. Hunt published her findings in the December Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology. Few prior studies have attempted to show that social-media use harms users' well-being, and those that have ...
University of Pennsylvania - 11/8/2018


Conversion 'therapy' begins at home: First study shows pivotal role of parents in conversion efforts to change LGBT adolescents' sexual orientation
A new study finds that attempts by parents and religious leaders or therapists to change the sexual orientation of LGBT adolescents ('conversion therapy') contribute to multiple health and adjustment problems in young adulthood. These include higher levels of depression and suicidal behavior, as well as lower levels of self-esteem, social support and life satisfaction, and lower levels of education and income in young adulthood.
San Francisco State University - 11/8/2018


Explaining happiness: Where emotional well-being comes from
It is widely believed that each person finds the source of happiness within themselves and nowhere else. To determine just how true this is, research psychologists of the Higher School of Economics conducted a survey on 600 individuals. The results of the study were published in the article Why Do I Feel This Way? Attributional Assessment of Happiness and Unhappiness. The researchers based their work on Bernard Weiner's Causal Attribution Theory. This helps determine to which causes ...
National Research University Higher School of Economics - 11/8/2018


People with Internet addiction react the worst when WiFi fails: Do you get frustrated and angry when your WiFi connection stops working? It could be because of your personality
Do you get frustrated and angry when your WiFi connection stops working? It could be because of your personality. When digital technology stops working, people with a fear of missing out (FOMO) -- the anxiety that you're missing a social experience others might be having while you're not online -- or an internet addiction have more extreme reactions, according to a new study in Heliyon.
Elsevier - 11/1/2018


New study: reduced screen time for young highly recommended for well-being
Too much time spent on gaming, smartphones and watching television is linked to heightened levels and diagnoses of anxiety or depression in children as young as age 2, according to a new study. Even after only one hour of screen time daily, children and teens may begin to have less curiosity, lower self-control, less emotional stability and a greater inability to finish tasks, reports San Diego State University psychologist Jean Twenge and University of Georgia psychology professor ...
San Diego State University - 10/29/2018


Veterans with PTSD improve mental health after therapeutic horseback riding intervention: The veterans felt 'greater confidence, gratitude and hope, as well as increased patience,' Baylor University researcher says
Veterans with combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder were less anxious and depressed and had an improved quality of life after an eight-week therapeutic horseback riding program, according to a Baylor University study. "PTSD is difficult to treat. But those who went through the program reported lessening of symptoms and better mental health," said lead author Beth A. Lanning, Ph.D., associate chair and associate professor of public health in Baylor's Robbins College of ...
Baylor University - 10/29/2018


Significant increase in mental health conditions among US students
University students in the US are showing increasingly higher rates of diagnosis for a range of mental health conditions, potentially putting their academic success at risk, suggests new research published in the Journal of American College Health. Using a national American College Health Association dataset consisting of over 450,000 undergraduate students, researchers investigated whether mental health diagnoses and treatment among university students changed between ...
Taylor & Francis Group - 10/24/2018


PTSD symptoms improve when patient chooses form of treatment, study shows
A multiyear clinical trial comparing medication and mental health counseling in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder shows that patients who chose their form of treatment -- whether drugs or therapy -- improved more than those who were simply prescribed one or the other regardless of the patient's preference. The study, led by the University of Washington and Case Western Reserve University, was conducted at outpatient clinics in Seattle and Cleveland. It found that both ...
University of Washington - 10/19/2018


Aerobic exercise has antidepressant treatment effects
An analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials indicates that supervised aerobic exercise has large antidepressant treatment effects for patients with major depression. The systematic review and meta-analysis is published in Depression and Anxiety. Across 11 eligible trials involving 455 adult patients (18-65 years old) with major depression as a primary disorder, supervised aerobic exercise was performed on average for 45 minutes, at moderate intensity, 3 times per week, and for ...
Wiley - 10/18/2018


Suicide risk in abused teen girls linked to mother-daughter conflict
Teenage girls who were maltreated as children are more likely to entertain suicidal thoughts if the relationship with their mother is poor and the degree of conflict between the two of them high. Researchers at the University of Rochester's Mt. Hope Family Center found that the quality of the mother-daughter relationship and their level of conflict are two direct mechanisms underlying the association between child maltreatment and suicidal thoughts during adolescence.
University of Rochester - 10/18/2018


How parenting affects antisocial behaviors in children: In a study of identical twins, the child who experienced harsher behavior and less parental warmth was more aggressive and exhibited more callous-unemotional traits
Less parental warmth and more harshness in the home environment affect how aggressive children become and whether they lack empathy and a moral compass, a set of characteristics known as callous-unemotional (CU) traits, according to findings from the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Michigan, and Michigan State University. The work was published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
University of Pennsylvania - 10/11/2018


Study firms up diet and depression link
Does fast food contribute to depression? Can a healthy diet combat mental illness? In an unusual experiment, James Cook University researchers in Australia have found that among Torres Strait Islander people the amount of fish and processed food eaten is related to depression. A JCU research team led by Professors Zoltan Sarnyai and Robyn McDermott looked at the link between depression and diet on a Torres Strait island, where fast food is available, and on a more isolated ...
James Cook University - 10/9/2018


Sexual harassment and assault linked to worse physical/mental health among midlife women
A new study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine suggests that experiences of sexual harassment and sexual assault could have a significant impact on the physical and mental health of midlife women. Study results, published today in JAMA Internal Medicine, also will be presented at the North American Menopause Society meeting on Friday, Oct. 5, 2018 in San Diego, CA. “When it comes to sexual harassment or sexual assault, our study shows that ...
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences - 10/3/2018


Opioid overdoses, depression linked
The link between mental health disorders and substance abuse is well-documented. Nearly one in 12 adults in the U.S is depressed, and opioid-related deaths are skyrocketing. As these numbers continue to climb, some mental health professionals have started to wonder if there’s a link between the two. According to a new study published in Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, the link is strong. “For every additional 1 percent of the population that has a depression diagnosis, ...
Purdue University - 10/3/2018


Low self-esteem connected to greater risk for opioid use: New research reveals life stressors most associated with increased risk for using opioids to cope
Health, family and romance problems appear to be the particular life stressors most associated with increased risk for using opioids to cope, and individuals with low self-esteem appear to be at risk for these connections, according to a new paper including researchers at Binghamton University, State University at New York. The research team, which included Binghamton University graduate student Damla Aksen, surveyed 1,000-plus adults about five life stressors, self-esteem and ...
Binghamton University - 10/3/2018


Shedding light on new treatment options for perimenopausal depression and sleep problems: New study suggests efficacy of sleep and light therapy in improving mood and sleep by altering circardian rhythms and sleep/wake cycles
Light therapy has long been a recognized treatment option for depression. But can it help perimenopausal women struggling with depression and sleep problems as the result of hormone changes? A new study from the University of California suggests that it can by altering a woman's natural sleep/wake cycle. Preliminary study results will be presented during The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in San Diego, October 3-6, 2018.
The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) - 10/3/2018


Talking with the doctor makes it easier to deal with grief and bereavement
In a comprehensive study, researchers from Aarhus University show that grieving patients who receive what is known as talk therapy at the general practitioner shortly after a relative's death, have a lower risk of suicide and psychiatric illness than others. Data from 207.000 million Danes is included in the register-based study, which can contribute to new practices in the preventative area. Losing a close family member is psychologically painful. In fact, it is so painful that the risk of ...
Aarhus University - 9/20/2018


Witnessing violence in high school as bad as being bullied
Students who witness violence in school at age 13 are at later risk of psycho-social and academic impairment at age 15, according to a new longitudinal study by researchers at Université de Montréal with colleagues in Belgium and France. In the study, published today in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, Michel Janosz of UdeM's School of Psycho-Education and his international team looked at a stratified cohort of nearly 4,000 Quebec high-school students.
University of Montreal - 9/17/2018


Brief psychotherapy benefits women caring for children with severe health issues: Depression, sleep improve after CBT intervention
Brief cognitive behavioral therapy significantly improved the mental health of women overwhelmed by caring for children with severe chronic health conditions, researchers at the University of Louisville have found. After five therapy sessions, study participants reported significantly decreased depressive symptoms, negative thinking and chronic stressors, and experienced improved sleep quality, according to Lynne Hall, Dr.P.H., R.N., associate dean of research and professor at the UofL ...
University of Louisville - 9/14/2018


Religious upbringing linked to better health and well-being during early adulthood
Participating in spiritual practices during childhood and adolescence may be a protective factor for a range of health and well-being outcomes in early adulthood, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Researchers found that people who attended weekly religious services or practiced daily prayer or meditation in their youth reported greater life satisfaction and positivity in their 20s--and were less likely to subsequently have depressive symptoms, ...
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health - 9/14/2018


One in Three College Freshmen Worldwide Reports Mental Health Disorder: Students from 19 colleges in eight countries report symptoms consistent with psychological disorder, study says
As if college were not difficult enough, more than one-third of first-year university students in eight industrialized countries around the globe report symptoms consistent with a diagnosable mental health disorder, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. “While effective care is important, the number of students who need treatment for these disorders far exceeds the resources of most counseling centers, resulting in a substantial unmet need for mental ...
American Psychological Association - 9/13/2018


Widely used youth behavior treatment may be ineffective -- study
A long-established treatment used around the world to help troubled young people and their families tackle behavioural problems may not be as effective as its practitioners claim - a new study reveals. Functional Family Therapy (FFT) is a short-term, evidence-based intervention provided at over 270 sites worldwide - mostly within the US, but also in Belgium, Ireland, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden and the UK. Researchers at the University of Birmingham recommend ...
University of Birmingham - 9/11/2018


Emotional scars increase the risk of sports injury
Active top-flight athletes who have experienced sexual or physical abuse at some time in their life run a greater risk of sports-related injury. A new study from the Athletics Research Center at Linköping University in Sweden has shown an association between lifetime abuse experience and injury risk in female athletes. The study has been carried out on elite athletes in Sweden, and is the first of its kind to investigate the consequences of sexual and physical abuse for athletes.
Linköping University - 9/7/2018


Sexual violence haunts women with vivid memories decades later: Memories of sexual assault trigger more stress than other traumatic experiences, according to a new Rutgers-New Brunswick study
Women who are sexually assaulted experience more vivid memories than women coping with the aftermath of other traumatic, life-altering events not associated with sexual violence, according to a new Rutgers University–New Brunswick study. The research, published in Frontiers in Neuroscience, found that women who had suffered from sexual violence, even those who were not diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), had more intense memories – even years after ...
Rutgers University - 9/6/2018


Higher depression risk in young adulthood associated with autism spectrum disorders
Bottom Line: Autism spectrum disorders (ASD), especially without an accompanying intellectual disability, were associated with greater risk for depression in young adulthood compared with the general population and siblings without ASD. Why The Research Is Interesting: Mental health problems, including depression, are considered common in people with ASD. Understanding depression in people with ASD is important because it can further reduce social function. The identification and ...
JAMA Network Open - 8/31/2018


Trends over 20 years in ADHD diagnoses among US children, adolescents
Bottom Line: Diagnosed attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in U.S. children and adolescents appears to have become more common over 20 years, with an increase in estimated prevalence from 6.1 percent to 10.2 percent between 1997 and 2016, although the cause of this apparent uptick still needs to be better understood. Why The Research Is Interesting: Current estimates of the prevalence of ADHD and details on long-term trends are needed for research, clinical care and ...
JAMA Network Open - 8/31/2018


Children suffering from tics can be helped by both group and individual therapy
Therapy against tics works, and both group and individual treatment are suitable methods to achieve a good effect. This is the conclusion reached by a group of Danish researchers after comparing the effect of different types of tics training based on a new Danish manual. This means that therapists in future can plan a much better course of treatment for those children who experience a very difficult life with tics.
Aarhus University - 8/29/2018


Close ties with fathers help daughters overcome loneliness: Study examined changes in child loneliness over time
Fathers play a key role in helping their young daughters overcome loneliness, a new study has found. Researchers found that girls tended to report less loneliness as they went from first grade to fifth grade. But loneliness declined more quickly among girls who had a closer relationship with their fathers. “The bond between fathers and daughters is very important,” said Xin Feng, co-author of the study and associate professor of human sciences at The Ohio State University.
Ohio State University - 8/28/2018


Diet has bigger impact on emotional well-being in women than in men
Women may need a more nutrient-rich diet to support a positive emotional well-being, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York. Mounting evidence suggests that anatomical and functional differences in men's and women's brain dictate susceptibility to mental disease. However, little is known about the role of dietary patterns in gender-specific psychological wellbeing. A team of researchers led by Lina Begdache, assistant professor of ...
Binghamton University - 8/27/2018


On-again, off-again relationships might be toxic for mental health: On-off relationships are associated with higher rates of abuse, poorer communication and lower levels of commitment
Sam and Diane from “Cheers.” Ross and Rachel from “Friends.” Carrie and Mr. Big from “Sex and the City.” These are just some of the notable on-again, off-again couples found in pop culture. While their relationships made for storylines that kept viewers entertained, a researcher from the University of Missouri says that the pattern of breaking up and getting back together can impact an individual’s mental health and not for the better. He suggests people in these kinds of relationships ...
University of Missouri-Columbia - 8/23/2018


Maternal depression may alter stress and immune markers in children
New research suggests that depression in women may affect their children's stress and physical well-being throughout life. For the Depression & Anxiety study, researchers followed 125 children from birth to 10 years. At 10 years, mothers' and children's cortisol (CT) and secretory immunoglobulin (s-IgA)--markers of stress and the immune system--were measured, mother-child interaction were observed, mothers and children underwent psychiatric diagnoses, and children's externalizing and ...
Wiley - 8/22/2018


Depressed teens, depressed parents: Treating depression in teens may benefit parents’ mental health, too, study finds
The bond between parent and child extends far beyond sharing similar looks or behaviors, as symptoms of depression in teens and parents appear to be linked, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. When a teen’s depression improved through treatment, so did depression experienced by his or her parent, according to Kelsey R. Howard, MS, of Northwestern University, who presented the findings.
American Psychological Association - 8/11/2018


New theory may explain cause of depression and improve treatments: A review of recent studies suggests mitochondria may be the root cause of depression, providing an opportunity for novel antidepressant medication
A new area in depression research suggests dysfunction in mitochondria -- the main source of energy for cells -- could lead to major depression. Published in Frontiers in Neuroscience, this new insight to long-held theories on the causes of depression could lead to the development of novel and more effective antidepressant drugs. Depression is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 20% of the population. It is commonly thought to be caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, ...
Frontiers - 8/9/2018


Even men get the blues after childbirth: Postpartum depression as prevalent in new fathers as mothers, research says
When it comes to postpartum depression, most people think of the mother's well-being, but research suggests that a similar proportion of men experience some form of depression after the birth of a child, according to presentations at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. "Much has been written about women's experiences of pregnancy and postpartum, most of it exploring negative reactions, ranging from clinical depression to postpartum psychosis, and ...
American Psychological Association - 8/9/2018



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