Find a Therapist at NetworkTherapy.com


Find a Therapist or Treatment Center

Highlights
   for Consumers
Find a Therapist
Find a Treatment Center
About Therapy
Research a Condition
Research a Medication
Support Groups
National Hotlines
Featured Articles
What's New

   for Providers
List Your Practice
List Your Treatment Center
Publish an Article
My Account
Webmail


Therapist Index: Find a Therapist by Location
   Find a Therapist by City
   Find a Therapist by State

Topic Index
   Conditions A to Z
Acute Stress
ADHD
Adjustment Disorder
Agoraphobia
Alcoholism
Alzheimer's Disease
Amnestic Disorders
Amphetamine Depen.
Anorexia
Antisocial Personality
Asperger Syndrome
Autism
Avoidant Personality
-------------------------
Bereavement
Binge Eating Disorder
Bipolar Disorder
Body Dysmorphia
Borderline Personality
Brief Psychotic Dis.
Bulimia
-------------------------
Cannabis Dependence
Child Abuse
Chronic Tics
Circadian Rhythm Dis.
Cocaine Dependence
Codependency
Conduct Disorder
Conversion Disorder
Cyclothymia
-------------------------
Delirium
Delusional Disorder
Dementia
Dependent Personality
Depersonalization
Depression
Dissociative Amnesia
Dissociative Fugue
Dissociative Identity
Domestic Violence
Dyspareunia
Dysthymia
-------------------------
Elder Abuse
Encopresis
Enuresis
Exhibitionism
Expressive Lang. Dis.
-------------------------
Factitious Disorder
Feeding Disorder
Female Orgasmic Dis.
Fetishism
Frotteurism
-------------------------
Gender Identity Dis.
Generalized Anxiety
-------------------------
Hallucinogen Depen.
Histrionic Personality
HIV/AIDS
Hypochondriasis
-------------------------
IED
Inhalant Dependence
-------------------------
Kleptomania
-------------------------
Male Erectile Disorder
Male Orgasmic Dis.
Malingering
Mathematics Disorder
Mental Retardation
-------------------------
Narcissistic Personality
Narcolepsy
Nicotine Dependence
Nightmare Disorder
-------------------------
OCD
OCPD
Opioid Dependence
Oppositional Defiant
-------------------------
Pain Disorder
Panic Disorder
Paranoid Personality
Pathological Gambling
Pedophilia
Phencyclidine Depen.
Phonological Disorder
Pica
Postpartum Depression
Premature Ejaculation
Primary Hypersomnia
Primary Insomnia
PTSD
Pyromania
-------------------------
Reactive Attachment
Reading Disorder
Restless Legs Synd.
Rett Syndrome
Rumination Disorder
-------------------------
SAD
Schizoaffective Dis.
Schizoid Personality
Schizophrenia
Schizophreniform Dis.
Schizotypal Personality
Sedative Dependence
Selective Mutism
Self-Injury
Separation Anxiety
Sexual Abuse
Sexual Arousal Dis.
Sexual Aversion Dis.
Sexual Desire Dis.
Sexual Masochism
Sexual Sadism
Shared Psychotic Dis.
Sleep Apnea
Sleep Terror
Sleepwalking
Social Phobia
Somatization
Specific Phobia
Stereotypic Movement
Stress
Stuttering
Suicide
-------------------------
Tourette Syndrome
Transient Tics
Transvestic Fetishism
Trichotillomania
-------------------------
Vaginismus
Voyeurism
   Medications A to Z

Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
«  Previous    1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23    Next Page  »
Making New Year's Resolutions That Last: Think small, manageable goals -- not sweeping lifestyle changes, psychologists advise
Though made with the best of intentions, most New Year's resolutions last about as long as the bubbles in leftover champagne. That's why experts from the American Psychological Association (APA) suggest planning manageable positive lifestyle changes for the new year instead of major life overhauls that set you up for disappointment. "Setting small, attainable goals throughout the year -- instead of a singular, overwhelming goal on January 1 -- can help you reach whatever it is ...
HealthDay - 12/30/2016


New Research Links Social Media Usage to Depression
During the holiday season, it’s common for social media fundies to post reels of photos highlighting their trip abroad for all their ‘friends’ to absorb. This affirmation triggers a release of dopamine. The natural ‘Reward-Molecule’ comes when the one who posted receives approval such as a ‘like’ or a comment, according to a study done by San Francisco-based media buying firm, RadiumOne. However, not much research exists about the viewer of these posts. For those on the receiving end ...
Interesting Engineering - 12/29/2016


The late effects of stress: New insights into how the brain responds to trauma
A new study has shown how a single instance of severe stress can lead to delayed trauma. A stressful incident can lead to increased electrical activity in a brain region known as the amygdala. This activity is delayed and is dependent on a molecule known as the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor (NMDA-R), a protein on nerve cells known to be crucial for memory functions.
ScienceDaily - 12/28/2016


Is there such a thing as an emotional hangover? NYU researchers find that there is
Emotional experiences can induce physiological and internal brain states that persist for long periods of time after the emotional events have ended, a team of New York University scientists has found. This study, which appears in the journal Nature Neuroscience, also shows that this emotional "hangover" influences how we attend to and remember future experiences. "How we remember events is not just a consequence of the external world we experience, but is also strongly ...
EurekAlert - 12/26/2016


Feeling blue? Taking a break from Facebook might help
A new study shows that regular use of social networking such as Facebook can negatively affect your emotional well-being and satisfaction with life. But you don't have to quit Facebook altogether; simply changing your social networking behavior and taking an occasional break from Facebook may lift your spirits, according to the study published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
EurekAlert - 12/20/2016


A cure for social anxiety disorders: Cognitive therapy shown to be most effective treatment
Social phobia is the most common anxiety disorder of our time. But the current treatment regimen for patients with this diagnosis has not proven very effective. Now NTNU researchers believe they have found a cure for social anxiety disorders. “We’ve set a new world record in effectively treating social anxiety disorders,” says Hans M. Nordahl, a professor of behavioural medicine at NTNU. He has led a project with a team of doctors and psychologists from NTNU and the ...
Norwegian University of Science and Technology - 12/16/2016


Child Abuse Cases in Army Families May Be Under-Reported: Some kids 'are falling through the cracks of a broken system,' researcher says
Child abuse within U.S. Army families may be significantly under-reported, a new study suggests. Researchers found that only one-fifth of diagnosed child abuse and neglect cases among U.S. Army-dependent children from 2004 to 2007 had a substantiated report with the Army's Family Advocacy Program (FAP). The program is responsible for investigating and treating child abuse. That's less than half the rate (44 percent) of child abuse cases substantiated by civilian Child Protective ...
HealthDay - 12/14/2016


Pessimists – You Aren’t Alone in Feeling Down: New study by UC Riverside psychology professor proves that even optimists get the blues
Waiting for those tests results? Waiting to hear who won the election? And while waiting, does the feeling of dread start to creep in? Turns out, as the moment of uncertain news draws nearer and nearer, bracing for the worst comes as second nature to optimists and pessimists alike. In a new study called “Even Optimists Get the Blues: Inter-Individual Consistency in the Tendency to Brace for the Worst,” published in the Journal of Personality, Kate Sweeny, psychology professor ...
University of California, Riverside - 12/13/2016


Sleep helps process traumatic experiences
If we sleep in the first 24 hours after a traumatic experience, this helps pigeonhole and process the distressing memories more effectively, as researchers from the University of Zurich and the Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich demonstrate in a new study. Sleep could thus be used as an early prevention strategy for posttraumatic stress disorders.
University of Zurich - 12/13/2016


Type of psychotherapy matters in treatment of irritable bowel syndrome
Previous studies have found that, on average, psychotherapy is just as effective as medications in reducing the severity of symptoms of this gastrointestinal disorder and the type of psychotherapy did not seem to matter. Now, psychologists at Vanderbilt University have looked at different types of psychotherapy to determine which is best at improving the ability of IBS patients to participate in daily activities. They found that one form, called cognitive behavior therapy, was the most ...
ScienceDaily - 12/12/2016


Emerging Trends in Alcohol Binge and Use Disorders Among Older Adults: The evidence of increased unhealthy alcohol use among older adults cannot be ignored
Alcohol is the most commonly used psychoactive substance among older adults, and this group can have unique risks associated with alcohol consumption—in even lower amounts—compared to younger persons. “Older adults have particular vulnerabilities to alcohol due to physiological changes during aging, including increasing chronic disease burden and medication use,” said Benjamin Han, MD, MPH, a geriatrician and health services researcher at the Center for Drug ...
New York University - 12/12/2016


Shooting, gang violence exposure leads to PTSD: Strong correlation between PTSD symptoms and severe depression
The violence that women in disadvantaged neighborhoods experience and witness can result in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and full diagnoses, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study that examined a disadvantaged Chicago neighborhood. Also noteworthy, women with PTSD diagnosis or sub-threshold PTSD had significantly more severe depression symptoms than women in the study who didn’t report experiencing trauma. Every woman who ...
Northwestern University - 12/8/2016


Drug Use Strong Predictor for Postpartum Mental Health Problems
New research from North Carolina State University and the University of British Columbia finds that a woman’s lifetime history of drug use can help predict whether the woman will suffer from problems with stress and anxiety after childbirth. The finding could help health-care providers screen pregnant women for mental health problems and provide relevant treatment. “There’s been a lot of attention recently on the need to incorporate mental health screening into prenatal care, and it ...
North Carolina State University - 12/8/2016


Comparing yourself with others on Facebook is more likely to lead to feelings of depression than making social comparisons offline, investigators report
Comparing yourself with others on Facebook is more likely to lead to feelings of depression than making social comparisons offline. That's one of the findings from a review of all the research on the links between social networking and depression by David Baker and Dr Guillermo Perez Algorta from Lancaster University. They examined studies from 14 countries with 35,000 participants aged between 15 and 88. There are among 1.8 billion people on online social networking sites ...
ScienceDaily - 11/28/2016


Depression in young people affects the stomach, anxiety the skin
Mental disorders and physical diseases frequently go hand in hand. For the first time, psychologists at the University of Basel and Ruhr University Bochum have identified temporal patterns in young people: arthritis and diseases of the digestive system are more common after depression, while anxiety disorders tend to be followed by skin diseases. Physical diseases and mental disorders affect a person's quality of life and present a huge challenge for the healthcare system.
EurekAlert - 11/24/2016


Active-duty military find PTSD relief through individual cognitive therapy: One-on-one therapy eliminated PTSD diagnoses for almost half of trial participants
Although both group and individual therapy can ease post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in active-duty military service members, individual therapy relieved PTSD symptoms better and quicker, according to a study led by a Duke University School of Medicine researcher. The randomized clinical trial is the largest to date to examine an evidence-based treatment for active-duty military service members, with 268 participants from the U.S. Army's Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas.
EurekAlert - 11/23/2016


Everyday creative activity may lead to an "upward spiral" of increased wellbeing and creativity in young adults, new research suggests
In their study, Department of Psychology researchers asked 658 university students to keep a daily diary of their experiences and emotional states over 13 days. After analysing the diaries the researchers, led by Dr Tamlin Conner, found a pattern of the participants feeling more enthusiasm and higher "flourishing" than usual following days when they were more creative. Flourishing is a psychological concept that can be described as increasing positive growth in oneself.
ScienceDaily - 11/23/2016


Fear of the unknown common to many anxiety disorders
Several anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, social anxiety disorder and specific phobias, share a common underlying trait: increased sensitivity to uncertain threat, or fear of the unknown, report researchers. The finding could help steer treatment of these disorders away from diagnosis-based therapies to treating their common characteristics.
ScienceDaily - 11/18/2016


Neighborhoods May Be Key to Teens' Mental Well-Being: When neighbors look out for others' kids, children have better emotional health, study finds
Teenagers living in cohesive neighborhoods -- where trusted neighbors get involved in monitoring each other's children -- experience fewer symptoms of depression and anxiety, a new study suggests. The researchers also found consistent results across different cities regardless of family composition and neighborhood income, indicating strong neighborhoods help teen mental health across various populations.
HealthDay - 11/18/2016


The key to a better mood for young men is a nut: Professor says nutrient-dense walnut a must for disposition
College can be a stressful time for young adults as they figure out how to manage intense daily routines that include work, study and play. Eat well, exercise and get plenty of sleep is a familiar mantra to alleviate this stress, but now with the results of his latest study, UNM Nutrition Professor Peter Pribis is able to tell college students that walnuts could be a key to a happier state-of-mind. In this first intervention study in humans, Pribis measured the effect of walnut consumption ...
University of New Mexico - 11/18/2016


Scientists Explore How Nutrition May Feed Mental Health
Good nutrition has long been viewed as a cornerstone of physical health, but research is increasingly showing diet’s effect on mental health, as well. A special section in Clinical Psychological Science highlights the different approaches that psychology researchers are taking to understand the many ways in which nutrition and mental health intersect.
Association for Psychological Science - 11/17/2016


Marijuana could help treat drug addiction, mental health
Using marijuana could help some alcoholics and people addicted to opioids kick their habits, a UBC study has found. "Research suggests that people may be using cannabis as an exit drug to reduce the use of substances that are potentially more harmful, such as opioid pain medication," says the study's lead investigator Zach Walsh, an associate professor of psychology at UBC's Okanagan campus.
EurekAlert - 11/16/2016


Depression rates growing among adolescents, particularly girls: Study shows 1 in 6 girls report experiencing an episode of clinical depression over previous year
The rate of adolescents reporting a recent bout of clinical depression grew by 37 percent over the decade ending in 2014, with one in six girls reporting an episode in the past year, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. The findings, published online Nov. 14 in the journal Pediatrics, highlight a need to focus on the mental well-being of young people and match those in peril with mental health professionals.
EurekAlert - 11/15/2016


Self-Harm a Cause of Death During Pregnancy and for New Moms: Suicide, overdoses are occurring when expecting and in first year of motherhood; depression a likely factor, study finds
In the past decade, "self-harm" has been the leading cause of pregnancy-related deaths in Colorado, a new study finds. Of all 211 maternal deaths in Colorado between 2004 and 2012, 30 percent were attributed to self-harm. That included suicides and drug overdoses -- most often in the year after a woman gave birth. Self-harm was the most common cause of maternal deaths -- ahead of car accidents, medical conditions and homicide, the researchers said.
HealthDay - 11/8/2016


Cannabis abuse possible cause of psychosis: The risk of developing psychosis is more than tripled for those who abuse cannabis, according to results from a new twin study
Researchers from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH), together with colleagues from Virginia Commonwealth University, examined the relationship between cannabis and psychosis using psychiatric interviews of Norwegian twins. The interviews reveal whether the twins had symptoms of psychosis and cannabis abuse. "Previous research has shown that patients with psychotic disorders use cannabis more often than the general population. However research has been divided ...
ScienceDaily - 11/8/2016


Parents Often Miss Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Kids: Signs may include nightmares, avoiding reminders of the trauma, feeling unsafe, researchers find
Parents often fail to recognize post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) in young children, a new British study says. "When people talk about PTSD they often think about soldiers returning from war zones. But children who experience traumatic events such as car accidents, assaults and natural disasters are also at risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder," said lead researcher Richard Meiser-Stedman, from Norwich Medical School at the University of East Anglia.
HealthDay - 11/8/2016


Brains of those with anorexia and bulimia can override urge to eat
Scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have discovered the neurological reasons why those with anorexia and bulimia nervosa are able to override the urge to eat. In a study published last week in the journal Translational Psychiatry, the researchers showed that normal patterns of appetite stimulation in the brain are effectively reversed in those with eating disorders.
EurekAlert - 11/7/2016


Individuals’ Well-Being Linked With When and How They Manage Emotions
Reframing how we think about a situation is a common strategy for managing our emotions, but a new study suggests that using this reappraisal strategy in situations we actually have control over may be associated with lower well-being. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. “Our results caution against a ‘one strategy fits all’ approach, which may be tempting to recommend based on many previous findings regarding ...
Association for Psychological Science - 11/2/2016


Sunshine matters a lot to mental health; temperature, pollution, rain not so much
Sunshine matters. A lot. The idea isn’t exactly new, but according to a recent BYU study, when it comes to your mental and emotional health, the amount of time between sunrise and sunset is the weather variable that matters most. Your day might be filled with irritatingly hot temperatures, thick air pollution and maybe even pockets of rainclouds, but that won’t necessarily get you down. If you’re able to soak up enough sun, your level of emotional distress should remain stable.
Brigham Young University - 11/2/2016


Less Labor Pain, Lower Postpartum Depression Risk? Reduced inflammation one possible reason for the association, researcher says
Women who obtain good pain relief during labor may have to worry less about postpartum depression later, new research suggests. "Reducing pain during labor is associated with a reduced risk for postpartum depression," said study leader Dr. Grace Lim, director of obstetric anesthesiology at Magee-Women's Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.
HealthDay - 10/26/2016


More than 50% of Americans now have at least one chronic health condition, mental disorder or substance-use issue
With the future of US healthcare likely to rest on the next presidency, a new study from Psychology, Health & Medicine highlights just how complex the medical needs of many Americans now are. As the authors of the study, Elizabeth Lee Reisinger Walker and Benjamin G. Druss, observe: "The health of individuals in the U.S.A. is increasingly being defined by complexity and multimorbidity, the co-occurrence of two or more chronic medical conditions." Given the medical and socio-economic ...
ScienceDaily - 10/25/2016


Suicide prevention: Reacting to the tell-tale signs
Can search engines save lives? LMU researchers are working on an approach which would enable search engines to more effectively identify users who are at risk of suicide and provide them with information on where to find help. Search engine queries not only reveal a lot about the user’s interests and predilections, they also contain information relating to their mood or state of health. In response to recommendations by the World Health Organization (WHO), search engines like Google are ...
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München - 10/24/2016


People with bipolar disorder more than twice as likely to have suffered childhood adversity
A University of Manchester study which looked at more than thirty years of research into bipolar, found that people with the disorder are 2.63 times more likely to have suffered emotional, physical or sexual abuse as children than the general population. In the study, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, the researchers identified 19 studies from hundreds published between 1980 and 2014 which gathered data from millions of patient records, interviews and assessments.
University of Manchester - 10/12/2016


Mom-to-Be's Antidepressant Use May Be Tied to Speech Issues in Child: Study shows a link but can't prove cause and effect, and experts stress that overall risk is small
Children whose mothers used an often-prescribed type of antidepressant during pregnancy may be more likely to develop speech and language disorders, a new study suggests. Researchers found that mothers who bought selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) drugs at least twice during pregnancy were 37 percent more likely to have a child with a speech and/or language disorder than those who did not take the antidepressants. SSRIs include medicines such as Celexa, Lexapro, ...
HealthDay - 10/12/2016


Childhood Family Environment Linked With Relationship Quality 60 Years Later
Growing up in a warm family environment in childhood is associated with feeling more secure in romantic relationships in one’s 80s, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings show that men who grew up in caring homes were more adept at managing stressful emotions when assessed as middle-aged adults, which helps to explain why they had more secure marriages late in life.
Association for Psychological Science - 10/11/2016


Why Parenting May Be More Stressful for Mom: Mothers are often doing household chores, but dads get more play time with the kids, study finds
Being a parent is more stressful for moms than dads, a new study suggests. "It's not that moms are so stressed out with their kids, but relative to fathers, they're experiencing more strain," said study co-author Kelly Musick. She's an associate professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. The likely reason: Moms spend more time with their kids while doing tedious chores like cooking, cleaning and child care, while dads spend more play and leisure time ...
HealthDay - 10/11/2016


Could mental math boost emotional health? New study could inform brain training for better mental health
Engaging a specific part of the brain during mental math exercises is connected with better emotional health, according to a new brain-scanning study published by Duke researchers in the journal Clinical Psychological Science. The research takes a preliminary step toward informing new brain training strategies to stave off depression and anxiety. Although the relationship between math and emotion needs further study, the new findings may also lead to new tests gauging the effectiveness of ...
Duke University - 10/10/2016


What’s really going on in PTSD brains? U-M experts suggest new theory
For decades, neuroscientists and physicians have tried to get to the bottom of the age-old mystery of post-traumatic stress disorder, to explain why only some people are vulnerable and why they experience so many symptoms and so much disability. All experts in the field now agree that PTSD indeed has its roots in very real, physical processes within the brain – and not in some sort of psychological “weakness”. But no clear consensus has emerged about what exactly has gone “wrong” in ...
University of Michigan Health System - 10/7/2016


Psychotherapy sessions are best in the morning when levels of helpful hormone are high
The study found that morning sessions helped psychotherapy patients overcome their panic and anxiety and phobic avoidance better, in part, because levels of cortisol -- a naturally occurring hormone -- are at their highest then, said clinical psychologist Alicia E. Meuret, Southern Methodist University, Dallas.
ScienceDaily - 10/4/2016


Can Childhood Traumas Make You Old Before Your Time? Study suggests link between family stress and potential damage to DNA
Childhood trauma might promote faster cellular aging in people, a new study suggests. Adults who had experienced stress as kids appeared to have an increased risk of shorter telomeres, which are found at the ends of a person's chromosomes. And that might increase the risk of illness and early death in adulthood, said lead researcher Eli Puterman. He is director of the Fitness, Aging & Stress Lab at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.
HealthDay - 10/3/2016



«  Previous    1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23    Next Page  »



Home  |  Provider Directory  |  Mental Health Library  |  Resource Center  |  For Providers
Find a Therapist  |  Find a Treatment Center  |  List Your Practice  |  List Your Treatment Center
About Us  |  Contact Us  |  User Agreement  |  Privacy Policy  |  Site Map
This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here. The information provided on this site is for educational or informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical or behavioral health care advice. The information is not intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care provider. Please consult your health care provider if you have any questions or concerns about your health.
Copyright © 2000-2018 NetworkTherapy.com, Inc. All rights reserved.
Welcome Guestbook What's New Site Map Find a Therapist Find a Treatment Center About Therapy Frequently Asked Questions Disorders & Conditions Medications Treatment Approaches Featured Articles News Archive Mental Health Dictionary Support Groups National Hotlines Web Directory Mental Health Books Related Web Sites For Providers Provider Login Back to top of page