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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Study finds no increased risk of autism, ADHD with prenatal antidepressant exposure
An analysis of medical records data from three Massachusetts health care systems finds no evidence that prenatal exposure to antidepressants increases the risk for autism and related disorders or for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In their report being published online in Translational Psychiatry, the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH)-based research team finds evidence that any increased incidence of autism or ADHD found in previous studies was probably associated with ...
EurekAlert - 1/5/2016

Antidepressant drug linked with increased risk of birth defects when taken in early pregnancy
Using paroxetine--a medication prescribed to treat conditions including depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder--during the first trimester of pregnancy may increase newborns' risk of congenital malformations and cardiac malformations. That's the conclusion of a recent analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.
EurekAlert - 1/5/2016

Being anxious could be good for you in a crisis: Brain prioritises threats, especially in anxious people
New findings could help explain the apparent 'sixth sense' we have for danger in social situations, with the direction of a person's gaze being a crucial cue. People with non-clinical anxiety are particularly well poised for action.
ScienceDaily - 12/29/2015

Are you Facebook dependent? New study findings reveal user trends
What can create a dependency on Facebook? In a new study, researchers learned the more a person uses Facebook to fulfill goals, the more dependent on the social media platform they may become. A Facebook dependency is not equivalent to an addiction. Rather, the reasons why people use Facebook determine the level of dependency they have on the social network. 301 Facebook users between the ages of 18 and 68 who post on the site at least once per month were studied.
ScienceDaily - 12/22/2015

Overeating and depressed? There's a connection, and maybe a solution
Chronic overeating and stress are tied to an increased risk of depression and anxiety, and in a new study, researchers explain why that happens and suggest a possible solution. The researchers report that the anesthetic ketamine reverses depression-like symptoms in rats fed a high-fat diet in a similar way it combats depression and synaptic damage of chronic stress in people.
ScienceDaily - 12/21/2015

Long-term effectiveness of family-level intervention for U.S.military children, families affected by wartime deployments
Family-level preventive intervention can lead to improved behavioral health outcomes for military families affected by wartime deployment, a new study reports. Results highlight significant reductions in anxiety and depression symptoms among deployed parent, home-based parent and their children after intervention.
ScienceDaily - 12/21/2015

Why do chronically lonely teens stay lonely? Even the rare invitation to a social event is likely to be met with suspicion, study finds
For chronically lonely adolescents, even the rare invitation to a social event is likely to be met with suspicion: 'It's not that I'm worthy, I just got lucky,' they'll tell themselves. And when not included in a gathering of peers, the chronically lonely teen will attribute it to some personal flaw. Chronically lonely individuals may respond to social situations in ways that perpetuate rather than reduce their loneliness, the researchers said.
ScienceDaily - 12/16/2015

ADHD May Hamper Social Relationships Early in Life: Study finds cycle of rejection by peers, worsening symptoms that may heighten difficulties
Young children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may experience more problems socializing with their peers, which can then contribute to worsening symptoms, a new study from Norway suggests. But the cycle between symptoms and social problems seems to diminish as children grow older, the study authors said.
HealthDay - 12/16/2015

Helping children at high risk for aggressive behavior found to have long-term benefits
A new longitudinal study that examined an intervention for children at high risk of developing behavior problems has found that teaching so-called soft skills was key to preventing criminal and delinquent problems later in life. Soft skills, such as self-control and social skills, are personality traits, attitudes, and motivations not included in traditional measures of intelligence.
ScienceDaily - 12/16/2015

Researchers investigate mental health of teens after dad leaves
Family breakdown and the insecure financial situation that often results can heighten worry and depressive symptoms in adolescents who are separated from their father, says Professor Jennifer O'Loughlin of the University of Montreal. However, these symptoms can disappear in the nine-month period following the separation. O'Loughlin came to these conclusions after conducting a study that was recently published in the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry.
University of Montreal - 12/15/2015

Certain antidepressants linked to heightened risk of mania and bipolar disorder
Taking certain antidepressants for depression is linked to a heightened risk of subsequent mania and bipolar disorder, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open. The strongest association seemed to be for serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs for short, and the dual action antidepressant venlafaxine, the analysis indicated.
EurekAlert - 12/15/2015

Taking antidepressants during pregnancy increases risk of autism by 87 percent
Using antidepressants during pregnancy greatly increases the risk of autism, Professor Anick Bérard of the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children's hospital revealed today. Prof. Bérard, an internationally renowned expert in the fields of pharmaceutical safety during pregnancy, came to her conclusions after reviewing data covering 145,456 pregnancies. “The variety of causes of autism remain unclear, but studies have shown that both genetics and environment ...
University of Montreal - 12/14/2015

Helping Others Dampens the Effects of Everyday Stress
Providing help to friends, acquaintances, and even strangers can mitigate the impact of daily stressors on our emotions and our mental health, according to new research published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. “Our research shows that when we help others we can also help ourselves,” explains study author Emily Ansell of the Yale University School of Medicine. “Stressful days usually lead us to have a worse mood and ...
Association for Psychological Science - 12/14/2015

ADHD Diagnoses Rising Among U.S. Kids, Study Finds: Girls, Hispanics fueling the increase in prevalence, but experts don't know why
A growing number of U.S. children have been diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) -- with girls and Hispanic children showing the biggest increases of all, a new study shows. Researchers found that in 2011, an estimated 12 percent of U.S. kids aged 5 to 17 had ever been diagnosed with ADHD. That was up 43 percent from 2003. "But what struck us the most were the increases among girls and Hispanic children," said senior researcher Sean Cleary, an associate professor of ...
HealthDay - 12/8/2015

Lack of Sleep Tampers with Your Emotions
Cranky or grumpy after a long night? Your brain's ability to regulate emotions is probably compromised by fatigue. This is bad news for 30 percent of American adults who get less than six hours of sleep per night, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A new Tel Aviv University study has identified the neurological mechanism responsible for disturbed emotion regulation and increased anxiety due to only one night's lack of sleep. The research reveals the ...
American Friends of Tel Aviv University - 12/8/2015

New Type of Antidepressant Shows Promise in Early Trial: More study is needed, but the compound may fight the condition in a different way, experts say
Millions of Americans battle depression, and many search for a medication that can help ease the condition. Now, researchers report in a small, early trial that an experimental antidepressant may be a safe and effective new option. "We need more treatments for depression," said Dr. Jeffrey Borenstein, president of the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation in New York City. "Current treatments for depression are effective for many people, but they don't work for everyone."
HealthDay - 12/8/2015

More Than a Quarter of New Doctors May Be Depressed: Grueling medical training may help explain finding, study says
More than one in four doctors-in-training may be depressed, which could put their patients at risk, a new study suggests. Researchers reviewed 54 studies involving 17,500 medical residents conducted worldwide over 50 years. They found that nearly 29 percent of the residents showed signs of depression, and that the rate of depression among medical residents is on the rise. The grind of medical training may help explain the finding, the researchers said.
HealthDay - 12/8/2015

Can your childhood pet make you depressed?
Having a pet offers companionship, comfort and emotional security to millions; many love and cherish them like family members. This can in turn have positive effects on mental health. However, what happens if young pet owners witness neglect, cruelty or death? Close bonding is a clear positive for a family unit with a well-cared for pet. But many pets suffer terrible abuse in the presence of children. New research from Girardi & Pozzulo's in Anthrozoös give a thought provoking new ...
ScienceDaily - 12/7/2015

Study 'opens gate' to understanding depression
A new scientific model that incorporates the myriad drivers of depression could lead to more precise treatment for an illness that affects 350 million worldwide. Developed by scientists at Michigan State University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the model provides a better understanding of depression and the foundation for creating a pioneering tool to attack the complex disorder.
Michigan State University - 12/1/2015

How anxiety can kill your social status
Neuroscientists at EPFL identify a brain region that links anxious temperament to low social status. The researchers were able to tweak social hierarchy in animals using a regular vitamin. There are important differences in how individuals approach life. While some people are relaxed and calm, others often see situations as threatening, making them worried and tense. This kind of 'trait' anxiety has significant consequences on a person's social life, ...
EurekAlert - 11/30/2015

Cognitive behavior therapy can help overcome fear of the dentist
Cognitive behavioral therapy could help many people with a dental phobia overcome their fear of visiting the dentist and enable them to receive dental treatment without the need to be sedated, according to a new study by King's College London.
ScienceDaily - 11/27/2015

Research raises questions over ADHD drug effects
Researchers voiced concern on Wednesday about poor quality studies on the popular ADHD treatment Ritalin, saying evidence of some benefits, but also of sleep problems and appetite loss, suggests the drug should be prescribed with caution. Ritalin is sold by Swiss pharmaceutical firm Novartis NOVN.VX, known generically as methylphenidate and also sold under the brand names Concerta, Medikinet and Equasym. It has been used to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity ...
Reuters - 11/24/2015

Inflammation linked to weakened reward circuits in depression
About one third of people with depression have high levels of inflammation markers in their blood. New research indicates that persistent inflammation affects the brain in ways that are connected with stubborn symptoms of depression, such as anhedonia, the inability to experience pleasure. The results were published online on Nov. 10 in Molecular Psychiatry.
Emory University - 11/20/2015

Study finds surprising links between bullying and eating disorders
Being bullied in childhood has been associated with increased risk for anxiety, depression and even eating disorders. But according to new research, it's not only the victims who could be at risk psychologically, but also the bullies themselves. Researchers at Duke Medicine and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine were surprised to find that in a study of 1,420 children, those who bullied others were twice as likely to display symptoms of bulimia, such as ...
EurekAlert - 11/16/2015

Not so happy old age? Depressive symptoms increase with age
The notion that older people are happier than younger people is being challenged following a recent study led by a University of Bradford lecturer. In fact it suggests that people get more depressed from age 65 onwards. The study, led by psychology lecturer Dr Helena Chui and recently published in the international journal Psychology and Aging, builds on a 15-year project observing over 2,000 older Australians living in the Adelaide area.
ScienceDaily - 11/13/2015

Have an apple-shaped body? You may be more susceptible to binge eating
Women with apple-shaped bodies -- those who store more of their fat in their trunk and abdominal regions -- may be at particular risk for the development of eating episodes during which they experience a sense of 'loss of control,' according to a new study.
ScienceDaily - 11/13/2015

Adults with OCD Can Benefit from Exposure Therapy When Common Drug Treatment Options Fail, Penn Study Finds
Patients with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) can improve their symptoms significantly by adding exposure and response prevention therapy to their treatment regimen when common drug treatment options have failed, according to new research from psychiatrists at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Exposure and response prevention therapy is a type of cognitive behavior therapy in which the patient is asked to confront ...
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine - 11/11/2015

Computer assisted CBT provides little or no benefits for depression
Researchers at the University of York have revealed computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (cCBT) is likely to be ineffective in the treatment of depression. Published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), Professor Simon Gilbody from York's Department of Health Sciences and the Hull York Medical School led the REEACT trial. The study was funded by the National Institute of Health Research Health Technology Programme.
EurekAlert - 11/11/2015

Talk Therapy May Beat Light Treatment for SAD: Seasonal affective disorder is form of depression tied to winter's shorter days
As winter's short days approach, more people will suffer from the depression of seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Now, new research suggests that talk therapy is better than light-box therapy in preventing relapses of the ailment. "SAD is a type of depression that follows a seasonal pattern based on the duration of sunlight present during the day," explained one expert not connected to the study, Dr. Matthew Lorber.
HealthDay - 11/6/2015

Omega 3 Supplements Don't Help With Depression: U.K. scientists find little evidence they ease symptoms
There's little evidence that taking omega-3 fatty acid supplements helps treat depression, researchers report. Some studies have suggested that these fish oil supplements may benefit people with major depression. But in a review published Nov. 5 in the Cochrane Library, researchers disagreed after analyzing 26 studies that included more than 1,400 people with depression.
HealthDay - 11/6/2015

Can parents' stress impact the health of future generations?
A new review published in Biology Letters of The Royal Society examines the long-term impacts of exposure to stressors during development. The review by Dr. Britt Heidinger, North Dakota State University, Fargo, and Dr. Mark Haussmann, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, looks at whether the effect of stressors on parents lingers to impact the health of their offspring.
ScienceDaily - 11/4/2015

Study: How depressive thoughts persevere, interfere with memory in people with depression
Intrusive, enduring, depressive thoughts are an ever-present part of daily life for people with depression. A first of its kind study from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas published earlier this year in the Journal of Affective Disorders shows that depressive thoughts are maintained for longer periods of time for people with depressed mood, and this extended duration may reduce the amount of information that these individuals can hold in their memory.
Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas - 11/3/2015

New study suggests fair division of chores leads to better sex life
Looking for more and better sex? If you're a man, you might consider doing the dishes once in a while. A new study out of the University of Alberta reveals that couples enjoyed more frequent and satisfying sex for both partners when men made a fair contribution to housework. The same study also found there's no relationship between the amount of housework male partners completed and the sexual functioning of a couple.
EurekAlert - 11/2/2015

Interrupted Sleep Not Good for Your Mood, Study Suggests: Those who slept fewer hours, but without disruptions, felt more positive the next day
Waking up several times a night is more likely to put you in a bad mood than a shorter amount of sleep without interruption, a new study finds. "When your sleep is disrupted throughout the night, you don't have the opportunity to progress through the sleep stages to get the amount of slow-wave sleep that is key to the feeling of restoration," said lead author Patrick Finan, assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University ...
HealthDay - 10/30/2015

Forget counting sheep -- Therapy could help chronic pain sufferers get a good night's sleep
Research conducted at the University of Warwick indicates that chronic pain sufferers could benefit from therapy to help them sleep better. The University of Warwick academics found that cognitive behavioural therapies (CBT) were either moderately or strongly effective in tackling insomnia in patients with long-term pain. They also discovered that chronic pain sufferers didn't just benefit from improved sleep but also experienced a wider positive impact on ...
EurekAlert - 10/30/2015

Self-injury: Raising the profile of a dangerous behavior
Nonsuicidal self-injury is not officially recognized by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) as a mental disorder, which means insurance may not cover treatment - despite estimates that anywhere from 10 to 40 percent of adolescents suffer from it. New research lays out a case for recognizing the condition, as profiled in a new report.
ScienceDaily - 10/30/2015

Study finds complete symptom resolution reduces risk of depression recurrence
People who have had an episode of major depression are at high risk for having another episode. Now, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found that the risk of recurrence is significantly lower for people with complete, rather than partial depressive symptom resolution. The findings, published online October 27 in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, point to the need to redefine clinically what constitutes the end of a major depressive ...
EurekAlert - 10/27/2015

Wives take problems to heart, husbands get frustrated: Study finds women want support; men not so much
The sociologist who found that 'A Happy Wife, Means a Happy Life' looked at sadness, worry and frustration -- among the most common negative emotions reported by older adults -- and discovered that men and women in long-term marriages deal with marriage difficulties differently.
ScienceDaily - 10/26/2015

Depression too often reduced to a checklist of symptoms
How can you tell if someone is depressed? The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) – the ‘bible’ of psychiatry – diagnoses depression when patients tick off a certain number of symptoms on the DSM checklist. A large-scale quantitative study coordinated at KU Leuven, Belgium, now shows that some symptoms play a much bigger role than others in driving depression, and that the symptoms listed in DSM may not be the most useful ones.
KU Leuven - 10/23/2015

Children in foster care three times more likely to have ADHD diagnosis
Researchers already knew that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was the most common behavioral health diagnosis among children enrolled in Medicaid. A new study to be presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics 2015 National Conference & Exhibition in Washington, DC, found that children in foster care were three times more likely than others to have an ADHD diagnosis.
ScienceDaily - 10/23/2015

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