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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Improving Therapy for a Very Common Disorder, Generalized Anxiety: UMass Amherst, Canadian research offers promising new approach
Results of a five-year, randomized clinical trial of a new combined treatment approach for severe generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) led by Henny Westra at York University, Toronto, with Michael Constantino at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Martin Antony at Ryerson University, Toronto, suggest that integrating motivational interviewing (MI) with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) improves long-term patient improvement rates than CBT alone.
University of Massachusetts Amherst - 3/21/2016


Young Transgender Women May Face Mental Health Woes: But study looked at a specific, high-risk group, so findings may not apply to all, researchers say
More than 40 percent of young, low-income transgender women with a history of unsafe sexual behavior struggle with at least one serious mental health issue and/or substance abuse problem, a small study suggests. Nearly 20 percent have two or more serious mental health diagnoses, the investigators said. The findings concern both teens and young adults who identify as women but were born male. The study also found that mental health and substance abuse issues are roughly two to four ...
HealthDay - 3/21/2016


Even with higher education, obese women run greater risk of depression
ven with higher education, women with a body mass index (BMI) of 30-34.9 (obese I) have double the risk of depression compared with women of normal weight and same educational attainment, according to a new study conducted by a sociologist at Rice University. The study was published this month by the journal Obesity Research and Clinical Practice.
EurekAlert - 3/21/2016


Heart Defects at Birth May Raise Risk for PTSD Later in Life: Rate is three times higher than in the general population, study finds
Adults born with heart defects may be at increased risk for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), researchers say. The reason? High levels of mental stress associated with their condition and treatments, the study authors suggested. The study included 134 adults who had been born with heart defects, known as congenital heart disease (CHD). The investigators found that 11 percent to 21 percent of these adults had PTSD, depending on the method used to assess symptoms of the disorder.
HealthDay - 3/18/2016


Many Men Have Body Image Issues, Too: Study finds appearance, weight, muscle tone often affect how guys feel about themselves
Women aren't the only ones at risk of worrying about their looks: A new study finds many men also fret about their physique, especially gay men. Surveys on male body image found that 20 percent to 40 percent of men were unhappy with some aspect of their looks, including physical appearance, weight, and muscle size and tone. Those feelings spilled into their health and sex lives, as well.
HealthDay - 3/18/2016


Women Who've Battled Postpartum Depression Often Limit Family Size: They're unlikely to have more than two kids, researchers say
Women who've had postpartum depression may not have more than two children, a new study suggests. Researchers examined data from more than 300 mothers born in the early to mid-20th century. Most of them lived in developed nations while raising their children, researchers said.
HealthDay - 3/18/2016


Chemical Discovered at UC Davis May Be New Tool for Depression Therapy
A chemical discovered in the Bruce Hammock laboratory at the University of California, Davis, may be a new, innovative tool to control depression, a severe and chronic psychiatric disease that affects 350 million people worldwide. The research, published March 14 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, involves studies of an inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase in rodents. Soluble epoxide hydrolase, or sEH, is emerging as a therapeutic target that acts on ...
University of California, Davis - 3/14/2016


If you treat a parent's depression, will their child's asthma improve?
A new study is underway to determine whether treating a depressed caregiver will improve the child’s asthma. The researchers say the findings eventually may reduce health disparities in child asthma because there is a higher percentage of depressed caregivers among children with asthma from minority and socio-economically disadvantaged groups.
ScienceDaily - 3/11/2016


'Thinking and Feeling’: UCSB researchers studying empathy in relationships find that in the absence of caring, understanding alone doesn’t cut it
So you had a terrible day at work. Or the bills are piling up and cash is in short supply. Impending visit from the in-laws, perhaps? When stress sets in, many of us turn to a partner to help us manage by being a sounding board or shoulder to cry on. Your odds of actually feeling better are much improved if they’re both those things. New research by psychologists at UC Santa Barbara reveals that simply understanding your partner’s suffering isn’t sufficient to be helpful in a stressful ...
University of California - Santa Barbara - 3/7/2016


New mothers with postpartum psychiatric disorders face increased risk of suicide: Study
Over a period spanning four decades, a total of eight Danish women committed suicide within a year of being diagnosed with a birth-related psychiatric disorder, including severe episodes of postpartum depression or psychosis. Despite the modest number, statistical evidence of a causal link between postpartum disorder and suicide is extremely strong, highlighting the need for medical staff to be aware of the risk, according to the researchers who carried out the study.
EurekAlert - 3/7/2016


Can social support be a bad thing for older adults?
Social support from family and friends does not have an entirely positive effect on mental health but is instead a 'mixed blessing,' say researchers. This is the first study that demonstrates the simultaneous negative and positive effects of social support among Singaporean older adults and has implications for policy makers.
ScienceDaily - 3/4/2016


People with anxiety show fundamental differences in perception
People with anxiety fundamentally perceive the world differently, according to a study reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on March 3. They aren't simply making the choice to "play it safe." The new study shows that people diagnosed with anxiety are less able to distinguish between a neutral, "safe" stimulus (in this case, the sound of a tone) and one that was earlier associated with the threat of money loss or gain. In other words, when it comes to emotional experiences, ...
EurekAlert - 3/3/2016


When it comes to predicting depression, race may matter more than was thought, study suggests
Depression can strike anyone, taking a toll on mental and physical health, friendships, work and studies. But figuring out who’s at risk for it is still a murky task. A new University of Michigan study suggests that standard ways of looking for depression risk may not work as well among blacks as they do among whites. But listening to how blacks describe their own mental health could help, the study suggests.
University of Michigan Health System - 3/3/2016


Brain tune-up may aid self-motivation
At our best, we motivate ourselves every day to get dressed and go to work or school. Although there are larger incentives at work, it's our own volition that powers us through our innumerable daily tasks. If we could learn to control the motivational centers of our brains that drive volition, would it lead us toward healthier, more productive lives? Using a new brain imaging strategy, Duke University scientists have now taken a first step in understanding how to manipulate specific neural ...
EurekAlert - 3/3/2016


Study links mobile device addiction to depression and anxiety
Is cellphone use detrimental to mental health? A new study from the University of Illinois finds that addiction to, and not simply use of, mobile technology is linked to anxiety and depression in college-age students. The study was published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior. “There’s a long history of the public fearing new technologies as they are deployed in society,” said U. of I. psychology professor Alejandro Lleras, who conducted this study with undergraduate honors student ...
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign - 3/2/2016


Link between ADHD, vision impairment in children
A new study sheds light on a link between noncorrectable vision problems and ADHD in children. Results from a large survey of 75,000 children suggest an increased risk of ADHD among children with vision problems that are not correctable with glasses or contacts, such as color blindness or lazy eye, relative to other children. This finding suggests that children with vision impairment should be monitored for signs and symptoms of ADHD so that this dual impairment of vision and attention ...
ScienceDaily - 2/25/2016


Attention bias modification treatment in depressed adolescents
A study to be published in the March 2016 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry(JAACAP) reports that adolescents with major depression who performed a computer-based task designed to shift attention from sad to neutral to positive word associations showed reductions in negative attention biases and clinician-rated depressive symptoms.
Elsevier - 2/24/2016


Why is impulsive aggression in children so difficult to treat?
Maladaptive and impulsive aggression is explosive, triggered by routine environmental cues, and intended to harm another person, making it a significant challenge for clinicians, family members, and others who interact with affected children and adolescents. Efforts to develop effective treatments would benefit from better descriptive and quantitative methods to characterize this disorder, as described in an article published in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, ...
EurekAlert - 2/23/2016


Parental anxiety/depression linked to pre-schoolers' fussy eating
Parental anxiety and/or depression during pregnancy and before their child starts school is linked to a heightened risk of that child becoming a 'fussy' eater, finds research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. The associations were evident for mums at both time periods, but just during the pre-school period for dads, the findings indicate.
EurekAlert - 2/22/2016


Young people with mental problems should receive help in their own environment
Young people with mental problems – especially those with psychotic-like symptoms – should receive help as early as possible and in their own environment. This was the conclusion of a joint study of the University of Helsinki, the Helsinki University Hospital Department of Psychiatry and the National Institute for Health and Welfare.
University of Helsinki - 2/18/2016


Smokers with depression try to quit more often but find it harder
People diagnosed with depression are about twice as likely to smoke as the general population. A survey of 6811 participants from Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the USA, published today in the scientific journal Addiction, found that although depressed smokers tried to quit smoking more often than other smokers, they were more likely to return to smoking within a month. This tendency seemed to be stronger for women than men.
ScienceDaily - 2/18/2016


Virtual reality therapy could help people with depression
An immersive virtual reality therapy could help people with depression to be less critical and more compassionate towards themselves, reducing depressive symptoms, finds a new study from UCL and ICREA-University of Barcelona. The therapy, previously tested by healthy volunteers, was used by 15 depression patients aged 23-61. Nine reported reduced depressive symptoms a month after the therapy, of whom four experienced a clinically significant drop in depression severity.
University College London - 2/15/2016


Vulnerability to depression linked to noradrenaline
The team of Bruno Giros, a researcher at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and professor of psychiatry at McGill University, reports the first-ever connection between noradrenergic neurons and vulnerability to depression. Published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, this breakthrough paves the way for new depression treatments that target the adrenergic system. Stressful life events--job loss, accident, death of a loved one--can trigger major depression in one person, but ...
EurekAlert - 2/15/2016


Study Ties Parents' Criticism to Persistent ADHD in Kids: If harsh comments focus on the child, rather than the behaviors, symptoms may linger, researcher says
Constant criticism from parents reduces the likelihood that children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) will have fewer symptoms by the time they reach their teens, a new study suggests. In many cases, ADHD symptoms decrease as children get older. But this doesn't occur in all cases. And the new study findings suggest that parental criticism may be a factor.
HealthDay - 2/12/2016


Mommy and me: Study shows how affectionate mothering can combat the effects of maternal depression
Certain parenting strategies can combat the negative impacts of maternal depression on an infant, suggests the first study of its kind. The work sought to investigate how a depressed mother's neuroendocrine response to stress can program the infant's hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, a set of signals and relationships between the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland and the adrenals. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is responsible for creating cortisol, a hormone released in ...
ScienceDaily - 2/11/2016


Exercise and Meditation – Together – Help Beat Depression, Rutgers Study Finds
Meditation and aerobic exercise done together helps reduce depression, according to a new Rutgers study. The study, published in Translational Psychiatry this month, found that the mind and body combination – done twice a week for only two months – reduced the symptoms for a group of students by 40 percent. “We are excited by the findings because we saw such a meaningful improvement in both clinically depressed and non-depressed students,” says Brandon Alderman, lead author of ...
Rutgers University - 2/10/2016


Poor REM Sleep May Be Linked to Higher Risk for Anxiety, Depression: Preliminary study suggests that emotional stress builds when this phase is disturbed, creating a 'vicious cycle'
REM (rapid eye movement) sleep is the phase when dreams are made, and a lack of good REM sleep has long been associated with chronic insomnia. But new research is building on that association, suggesting that the bad and "restless" REM sleep experienced by insomnia patients may, in turn, undermine their ability to overcome emotional distress, raising their risk for chronic depression or anxiety.
HealthDay - 2/8/2016


Study Links Concussion to Higher Risk of Later Suicide: But while researchers found an association, they didn't prove cause-and-effect
Average people who suffer a concussion may be three times more likely to commit suicide years after their brain injury, a new Canadian study suggests. Further, the long-term risk of suicide appears to increase even more if the head injury occurs during a weekend, researchers found. Based on these results, loved ones and physicians should keep a close eye on anyone who's had a concussion, even if the head injury happened years ago, said senior author Dr. Donald Redelmeier, senior ...
HealthDay - 2/8/2016


Super bowl won’t make you feel super, even if your team wins
With last year's Super Bowl drawing in over 114 million viewers, you'd assume that much of the audience tuned in not just for the commercials, but for the enjoyment of the game. You'd be wrong, say communication researchers Drew Margolin, and Wang Liao, who have created a unique way to watch the emotional dynamics of the game in real-time during this year's Super Bowl.
ScienceDaily - 2/5/2016


Do More 'Selfies' Mean More Relationship Woes? Survey of Instagram users suggests sharing these photos online may make romantic partners jealous
Posting too many "selfies" on social media might lead to serious problems with your romantic partner, according to a new study. Researchers conducted an online survey of 420 users of the social media site Instagram. The users were aged 18 to 62. The investigators found that those who believed they were good-looking were more likely to post selfies, which are photographic self-portraits. But the more selfies someone posted, the more likely the behavior was tied to jealousy and arguments in ...
HealthDay - 2/5/2016


Targeting the Mind/Body Connection in Stress
Our ability to cope with stress depends on how efficiently our body and mind regulate their response to it. Poor recovery from extremely stressful encounters can trigger post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, or even chronic somatic dysfunction (such as pain and fatigue) in some people. Insight into the multi-level sequence of events — from cellular changes to brain function, emotional responses, and observed behavior — will help medical professionals make more informed ...
American Friends of Tel Aviv University - 2/4/2016


ADHD Tied to Obesity Risk for Girls, Study Contends: Impulsiveness, eating disorders may help explain possible link, researcher says
Girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have their share of challenges. And new research suggests a tendency toward obesity may be one of them. In a 1,000-person study, Mayo Clinic researchers found that girls with ADHD may be twice as likely to be obese in childhood or early adulthood as girls without the disorder. This association was not linked to treatment with stimulants such as Ritalin and Adderall, the researchers said.
HealthDay - 2/4/2016


Antidepressants double the risk of aggression and suicide in children
Children and adolescents have a doubled risk of aggression and suicide when taking one of the five most commonly prescribed antidepressants, according to findings of a study published in The BMJ today. However, the true risk for all associated serious harms--such as deaths, aggression, akathisia and suicidal thoughts and attempts--remains unknown for children, adolescents and adults, say experts.
BMJ - 1/28/2016


Victimized adolescents more at risk of thinking about suicide or attempting suicide at 15
A new study reports that adolescents chronically victimized during at least two school years, are about five times more at risk of thinking about suicide and six times more at risk of attempting suicide at 15 years compared to those who were never victimized. Peer victimization includes actions such as being called names, spreading rumours, excluding someone from a group on purpose, attacking someone physically or cyberbullying.
ScienceDaily - 1/28/2016


Neuroticism predicts anxiety, depression disorders: Study suggests a single intervention to reduce risk for both disorders
A new Northwestern University and UCLA study has found for the first time that young people who are high on the personality trait of neuroticism are highly likely to develop both anxiety and depression disorders. "Neuroticism was an especially strong predictor of the particularly pernicious state of developing both anxiety and depressive disorders," said Richard Zinbarg, lead author of the study and professor of psychology in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern.
Northwestern University - 1/27/2016


No Evidence of Seasonal Differences in Depressive Symptoms
A large-scale survey of U.S. adults provides no evidence that levels of depressive symptoms vary from season to season, according to new research published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings are inconsistent with the notion of seasonal depression as a commonly occurring disorder. “In conversations with colleagues, the belief in the association of seasonal changes with depression is more-or-less taken as ...
Association for Psychological Science - 1/20/2016


Close to 40 percent of formerly suicidal Canadians subsequently achieve complete mental health
Close to 40% (38%) of formerly suicidal Canadians have reached a state of complete mental health, not only being free of symptoms of mental illness, suicidal thoughts or substance abuse in the preceding year, but also reporting almost daily happiness or life satisfaction, and social and psychological wellbeing according to a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto. The study will appear online this month in the journal Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior.
University of Toronto - 1/20/2016


Social anxiety is highly heritable but is affected by environment
Genes play a crucial role over time although environmental factors matter most in the short term, according to a major study into social anxiety and avoidant personality disorders from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. “The results show a surprisingly high heritability of the long-term risk of developing social anxiety,” says Fartein Ask Torvik, a researcher in the Department of Genetics, Environment and Mental Health at the institute.
Norwegian Institute of Public Health - 1/20/2016


Poverty linked to childhood depression, changes in brain connectivity
Many negative consequences are linked to growing up poor, and researchers at Washington University St. Louis have identified one more: altered brain connectivity. Analyzing brain scans of 105 children ages 7 to 12, the researchers found that key structures in the brain are connected differently in poor children than in kids raised in more affluent settings. In particular, the brain’s hippocampus — a structure key to learning, memory and regulation of stress — and the amygdala — which is ...
Washington University School of Medicine - 1/15/2016


Is suicide a tragic variant of an evolutionarily adaptive set of behaviors?
What do snapping shrimp, naked mole rats, ants, honeybees, and humans all have in common? They all share a similar colony-like organizational system that biologists have termed eusociality. Eusocial species have been remarkably successful in both surviving and thriving through the use of colony-level cooperation. One cooperative behavior used by all eusocial species is the self-sacrifice of individuals to defend the colony. For example, a eusocial bee may sting a predator to ...
EurekAlert - 1/14/2016



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