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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Could Too Many Refined Carbs Make You Depressed? Study found postmenopausal women who ate more processed foods faced higher risk of mood disorder
Refined carbohydrates -- such as those found in white bread, white rice and sodas -- may harm more than the waistlines of older women. New research shows that eating too much of these highly processed foods might also raise their risk of depression. Luckily, the opposite also appears to be true: The analysis also found that those who ate lots of whole grains, vegetables, fruits and dietary fiber appeared to see their risk for depression drop.
HealthDay - 8/7/2015


Punishing a child is effective if done correctly: Some children need consequences to succeed, psychologists say
While recently published parenting books have preached the effectiveness of positive parenting and "no drama" discipline, psychologists presenting at the American Psychological Association's 123rd Annual Convention said don't put timeout in timeout yet. "Parental discipline and positive parenting techniques are often polarized in popular parenting resources and in parenting research conclusions," presenter and researcher Robert Larzelere, PhD, of Oklahoma State ...
ScienceDaily - 8/6/2015


Mindfulness Therapy Might Help Ease PTSD: Study found learning to accept disturbing memories, thoughts and feelings reduced symptoms
Mindfulness therapy seems to help veterans cope with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new study suggests. Mindfulness encourages those suffering from PTSD not to avoid disturbing thoughts, feelings and experiences, but rather to accept them and put them in perspective. The approach may help those who aren't doing well using existing treatments, said lead researcher Melissa Polusny, a staff psychologist from the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs ...
HealthDay - 8/4/2015


Trauma experiences change the brain even in those without PTSD
Trauma may cause distinct and long-lasting effects even in people who do not develop PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), according to research. It is already known that stress affects brain function and may lead to PTSD, but until now the underlying brain networks have proven elusive.
ScienceDaily - 8/4/2015


More Evidence That Kids of Gay Parents Do Just Fine: Studies show children raised by 2 moms or 2 dads consider themselves 'different,' but stigma is lessening
On the heels of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that legalized same-sex marriage nationwide, new research suggests that children raised by gay parents are well-adjusted and resilient. The four new studies to be presented later this week at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association in Toronto set out to assess the psychological and sociological health of children raised by same-sex couples.
HealthDay - 8/4/2015


Study uncovers communication strategies couples can use to address financial uncertainty
Money can be a significant source of conflict in relationships, particularly during stressful times. New research details techniques romantic couples can use to address financial uncertainty, highlighting the importance of communication in managing uncertainty and reducing stress.
ScienceDaily - 8/3/2015


Even moderate picky eating can have negative effects on children's health
Picky eating among children is a common but burdensome problem that can result in poor nutrition for kids, family conflict, and frustrated parents. Although many families see picky eating as a phase, a new study finds moderate and severe picky eating often coincides with serious childhood issues such as depression and anxiety that may need intervention.
ScienceDaily - 8/3/2015


New survey enhances precision of distinguishing between expectable vs. worrisome early childhood misbehavior
Researchers are using a novel dimensional method for distinguishing misbehavior that is expectable in early childhood versus that which is cause for clinical concern. Using a survey developed by the researchers to enhance precision of clinical identification in early childhood the Multidimensional Assessment Profile of Disruptive Behavior (MAP-DB), scientists obtained mothers' reports of their preschoolers' irritability at multiple time points. They used these ...
ScienceDaily - 8/3/2015


Positive reinforcement plays key role in cognitive task performance in ADHD kids, according to new study
A little recognition for a job well done means a lot to children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) – more so than it would for typically developing kids. That praise, or other possible reward, improves the performance of children with ADHD on certain cognitive tasks, but until a recent study led by researchers from the University at Buffalo, it wasn’t clear if that result was due to heightened motivation inspired by positive reinforcement or because ...
University at Buffalo - 7/30/2015


Job Stress Might Make You Sick, Study Says: High levels linked to more leave for mental health problems
High levels of job stress may increase the risk of sick leave due to mental health disorders, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 12,000 workers in Sweden. Over five years, about 8 percent of the workers took mental health sick leave. Three-quarters of those who took mental health sick leave were women.
HealthDay - 7/30/2015


Adolescents with sleep problems more likely to self-harm
There is a strong relationship between sleep problems such as insomnia, and self-harm, according to findings in a new Norwegian study. The researchers say that depressive symptoms accounted for some, but not all, of the association to self-harming. However, the latter association remained significant even in the fully adjusted analyses.
ScienceDaily - 7/29/2015


Jealousy Can Drive Some to Problem Drinking, Study Suggests: Researchers say findings could help identify people at risk for alcholism
Intense jealousy may trigger drinking problems, a new study suggests. The researchers found that those whose self-esteem was dependent on their relationships were more likely to turn to alcohol if they became jealous. However, the study did not prove that jealousy caused drinking. But the findings might help identify people at risk for alcoholism, according to the authors of the study, which will be published in the October issue of the journal Addictive Behaviors.
HealthDay - 7/28/2015


Medical Marijuana May Pose Risk to Teens, Study Suggests: Having access to legal source of pot was linked to greater addiction risk than buying drug illegally
Teens who have legal permission to use medical marijuana are 10 times more likely to say they're addicted than those who get the drug illegally, a new study shows. University of Michigan researchers looked at nearly 4,400 high school seniors, including 48 who had medical marijuana cards, 266 who used others' medical marijuana and those who bought the drug from street dealers. Teens who used medical marijuana were far more likely to report problems with ...
HealthDay - 7/24/2015


Diagnosis of psychiatric disorders not as important as outcomes: Psychiatrist evaluates diagnostic practices
Nailing the diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder may not be important in prescribing effective treatment, according a clinical researcher. The National Institute of Mental Health estimates that nearly one in five Americans suffers from mental illnesses as defined in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.
ScienceDaily - 7/24/2015


Cell phone notifications may be driving you to distraction: New study shows message alerts are as disruptive as actually using phone
Whether you are alerted to an incoming phone call or text by a trendy ringtone, an alarm bell or a quiet vibration, just receiving a notification on your cell phone can cause enough of a distraction to impair your ability to focus on a given task, according to a new Florida State University study. In fact, the distraction caused by a simple notification — whether it is a sound or a vibration — is comparable to the effects seen when users actively use their cell phones to make calls or ...
Florida State University - 7/23/2015


Keep Fears At Bay By Learning Something New, Reports new study in Biological Psychiatry
Exposure therapy is a commonly used and effective treatment for anxiety disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and phobias. The goal of such therapy is to extinguish fear, which is accomplished by presenting cues that are known to predict a negative experience in the absence of that experience. Over time, learning that the 'danger cue' is no longer dangerous produces extinction of the fearful response.
Elsevier - 7/20/2015


Is Facebook use always associated with poorer body image and risky dieting?
College women who are more emotionally invested in Facebook and have lots of Facebook friends are less concerned with body size and shape and less likely to engage in risky dieting behaviors. But that's only if they aren't using Facebook to compare their bodies to their friends' bodies, according to the authors of a surprising new study at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine.
ScienceDaily - 7/20/2015


Americans are taking less vacation time than ever — and it's hurting their relationships
Thinking about skipping vacation to catch up at work? Postponing because of money? You're not alone. Americans are taking less vacation time than ever — but ditching that vacation can lead to problems. A survey of 1,200 adults by the U.S. Travel Association found that Americans are taking fewer vacation days than they did 15 years ago (16 days per year) with many people not taking all the vacation days they earn. And eschewing vacation time for more work can ...
Today - 7/15/2015


Your phone knows if you're depressed: Time spent on smartphone and GPS location sensor data detect depression
You can fake a smile, but your phone knows the truth. Depression can be detected from your smartphone sensor data by tracking the number of minutes you use the phone and your daily geographical locations, reports a small Northwestern Medicine study. The more time you spend using your phone, the more likely you are depressed. The average daily usage for depressed individuals was about 68 minutes, while for non-depressed individuals it was about 17 minutes.
EurekAlert - 7/15/2015


Meth, Coke Addiction May Affect Brains of Women More Than Men: It's not clear why past drug dependence is linked to less gray matter in female brains, researchers say
In a new study, brain scans reveal that women formerly addicted to stimulant drugs, such as cocaine and methamphetamine, have a smaller amount of a type of brain tissue known as "gray matter." This was true even though the women hadn't used the drugs for about a year before undergoing the brain scans, the study said. The research also hints, but cannot prove, that these drugs take a greater toll on addicted women's brains compared to men who had ...
HealthDay - 7/14/2015


Scientists identify new compounds that may treat depression rapidly with few side effects
A new study by researchers at University of Maryland School of Medicine has identified promising compounds that could successfully treat depression in less than 24 hours while minimizing side effects. Although they have not yet been tested in people, the compounds could offer significant advantages over current antidepressant medications.
University of Maryland School of Medicine - 7/13/2015


Researchers identify new spectrum disorder called ALPIM syndrome: Clarifies relationship between anxiety and physical disorders
The relationship between mental and physical health is well established. But when mental and physical illnesses co-occur, patients' accounts of physical illness are sometimes arbitrarily discredited or dismissed by physicians. Research by Jeremy D. Coplan, MD, professor of psychiatry at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, and colleagues has documented a high rate of association between panic disorder and four domains of physical illness. The research could ...
SUNY Downstate Medical Center - 7/9/2015


Study finds violent video games provide quick stress relief, but at a price
A study authored by two University of Wisconsin-Madison graduate students indicates that while playing video games can improve mood, violent games may increase aggressive outcomes. The researchers looked at how video games may be used to manage emotions — specifically, whether playing the games can improve mood.
University of Wisconsin-Madison - 7/9/2015


Study: Why social workers aren't discussing religion and spirituality with clients -- Baylor social work professor explains the disconnect between practitioners' beliefs and practice
Don't expect your social worker to ask you about your religious beliefs. New research by a Baylor University professor shows that licensed clinical social workers (LCSWs), who account for the largest number of clinically trained helping professionals, believe that discussions about their clients' religion and spirituality can often lead to improved health and mental health, but practitioners are not integrating these conversations into their counseling sessions.
Baylor University - 7/8/2015


Best Friends May Help Poor Kids Succeed: Study found having just one confidant helped teens find ways to cope with problems
Children who grow up in poor neighborhoods face more obstacles in life, but new research suggests that having a best friend can help these kids succeed. "Research into promoting resilience in young people has concentrated on support from the family, but friendships are important, too," study leader Rebecca Graber, a psychologist at the University of Sussex in England, said in a news release from the British Psychological Society.
HealthDay - 7/6/2015


Childhood Trauma Tied to Migraine Risk as Adult: Study found witnessing parental domestic violence produced most powerful association
Experiencing a traumatic event during childhood may raise the risk for migraines as an adult, new Canadian research suggests. "We found the more types of violence the individual had been exposed to during their childhood, the greater the odds of migraine," study author Sarah Brennenstuhl, from the University of Toronto, said in a university news release.
HealthDay - 7/3/2015


Doing good deeds helps socially anxious people relax
Being busy with acts of kindness can help people who suffer from social anxiety to mingle more easily. This is the opinion of Canadian researchers Jennifer Trew of Simon Fraser University and Lynn Alden of the University of British Columbia, in a study published in Springer’s journal Motivation and Emotion. Sufferers from social anxiety are more than just a little shy. Dealings with others might make them feel so threatened or anxious that they often actively avoid socializing.
Springer - 7/1/2015


For women with bipolar disorder, sleep quality affects mood
Poor sleep is associated with negative mood in women with bipolar disorder, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and University of Michigan Medical School. Bipolar disorder is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in mood, energy, activity levels and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks. The condition is marked by extreme mood episodes characterized as manic (highs) depressive (lows) or mixed. Sleep problems are common in ...
EurekAlert - 6/30/2015


Scans Suggest Recurrent Depression May Take Toll on the Brain: Shrinkage seen in region where new memories are made
The area of the brain involved in forming new memories, known as the hippocampus, seems to shrink in people with recurring depression, a new study shows. Australian researchers say the findings highlight the need to spot and treat depression when it first develops, particularly among young people. Ian Hickie, who co-directs the Brain and Mind Research Institute at the University of Sydney, led the study. His team looked at the neurology of almost 9,000 people ...
HealthDay - 6/30/2015


Trauma, PTSD May Raise Women's Odds of Heart Attack, Stroke: Study -- But the research didn't establish a cause-and-effect relationship
Women who have been through a traumatic event or developed post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) face an increased risk of heart attack or stroke, a new large study suggests. For women with severe PTSD, the study found a 60 percent higher risk of heart attack or stroke compared to women who hadn't experienced any trauma. The risk was increased 45 percent for women who experienced a traumatic event but didn't develop PTSD, the researchers added.
HealthDay - 6/29/2015


U.S. Kids Suffer High Rates of Assault, Abuse, Study Finds: Long-term effects include poor mental and physical health, experts say
More than one-third of U.S. children and teens have been physically assaulted -- mostly by siblings and peers -- in the past year, a new study finds. And one in 20 kids has been physically abused by a parent or another caregiver in the same time period, the researchers said. "Children are the most victimized segment of the population," said study author David Finkelhor, director of the Crimes against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire.
HealthDay - 6/29/2015


Supreme Court's Nod to Gay Marriage a Psychological Boost to Couples: Experts -- 5-4 decision should help bring acceptance, respect for these committed relationships
The U.S. Supreme Court's historic decision on Friday now guarantees the right to marriage for same-sex couples across the nation. In a close 5 to 4 vote, the judges upheld the legality of gay and lesbian couples to marry -- something that 36 states have already sanctioned. In the majority opinion, Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote that notions of equality and respect were key to the court's decision. "It is demeaning to lock same-sex couples out of a central institution of ...
HealthDay - 6/26/2015


'Overwhelming' Evidence That Same-Sex Parenting Won't Harm Kids: Review of thousands of studies on the issue finds broad consensus among experts
There is no evidence that having same-sex parents harms children in any way, a new comprehensive review finds. The well-being of children of same-sex couples was an issue the U.S. Supreme Court addressed in its landmark 5-4 ruling on Friday that upheld the legality of gay marriage. "Without the recognition, stability and predictability marriage offers, children suffer the stigma of knowing their families are somehow lesser," Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote in the ...
HealthDay - 6/26/2015


Therapy affects the brain of people with Tourette Syndrome
In addition to its effect on chronic tics, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can change the brain function of people with Tourette syndrome, new research confirms. Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder mainly characterized by motor and vocal tics in affected people. A tic is generally defined as a semi-voluntary movement or vocalization with no specific purpose.
ScienceDaily - 6/25/2015


Are your emotional responses normal or abnormal? Report examines the difference between normal and abnormal emotion in how we diagnose depression
We all feel emotion, we all get upset, can feel low, angry and overjoyed, but when do these emotional responses become something of a medical concern? When are these feelings inappropriate, too intense, or lasting too long? When is the emotional state you are in classed as depression? In light of the 5th revision of the influential Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM- 5), where a person can now be diagnosed as undergoing a ...
EurekAlert - 6/25/2015


Inflaming the Drive for Suicide: An analysis in Biological Psychiatry reveals link between suicide and inflammation
One American dies from suicide every 12.8 minutes, making suicide the tenth leading cause of death in the United States according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. There is consensus that if we could better predict who was at risk for suicide, then we could more effectively intervene to reduce this terrible burden on individuals, families and public health. A new analysis of existing studies strongly supports the idea that there are increased levels of ...
Elsevier - 6/24/2015


Consciousness has less control than believed, according to new theory
Consciousness -- the internal dialogue that seems to govern one's thoughts and actions -- is far less powerful than people believe, serving as a passive conduit rather than an active force that exerts control, according to a new theory proposed by an SF State researcher. Associate Professor of Psychology Ezequiel Morsella's "Passive Frame Theory" suggests that the conscious mind is like an interpreter helping speakers of different languages communicate.
San Francisco State University - 6/23/2015


Low-energy activities that involve sitting down are associated with an increased risk of anxiety, according to research published in the open-access journal BMC Public Health
These activities, which include watching TV, working at a computer or playing electronic games, are called sedentary behavior. Further understanding of these behaviors and how they may be linked to anxiety could help in developing strategies to deal with this mental health problem. Many studies have shown that sedentary behavior is associated with physical health problems like obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. However, there has ...
EurekAlert - 6/18/2015


Stress in low-income families can affect children's learning
Children living in low-income households who endure family instability and emotionally distant caregivers are at risk of having impaired cognitive abilities according to new research from the University of Rochester. The study of 201 low-income mother-child pairs, conducted at Mount Hope Family Center, tracked the levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, in the children at ages 2, 3, and 4. It found that specific forms of family adversity are linked to both elevated and ...
ScienceDaily - 6/18/2015


Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder: More than just picky eating
A new commentary by experts reflects on the clinical impact of the diagnosis of Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder, and the work that remains in terms of treatments and improved outcomes.
ScienceDaily - 6/18/2015



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