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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Trauma, PTSD May Raise Women's Odds of Heart Attack, Stroke: Study -- But the research didn't establish a cause-and-effect relationship
Women who have been through a traumatic event or developed post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) face an increased risk of heart attack or stroke, a new large study suggests. For women with severe PTSD, the study found a 60 percent higher risk of heart attack or stroke compared to women who hadn't experienced any trauma. The risk was increased 45 percent for women who experienced a traumatic event but didn't develop PTSD, the researchers added.
HealthDay - 6/29/2015


U.S. Kids Suffer High Rates of Assault, Abuse, Study Finds: Long-term effects include poor mental and physical health, experts say
More than one-third of U.S. children and teens have been physically assaulted -- mostly by siblings and peers -- in the past year, a new study finds. And one in 20 kids has been physically abused by a parent or another caregiver in the same time period, the researchers said. "Children are the most victimized segment of the population," said study author David Finkelhor, director of the Crimes against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire.
HealthDay - 6/29/2015


Supreme Court's Nod to Gay Marriage a Psychological Boost to Couples: Experts -- 5-4 decision should help bring acceptance, respect for these committed relationships
The U.S. Supreme Court's historic decision on Friday now guarantees the right to marriage for same-sex couples across the nation. In a close 5 to 4 vote, the judges upheld the legality of gay and lesbian couples to marry -- something that 36 states have already sanctioned. In the majority opinion, Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote that notions of equality and respect were key to the court's decision. "It is demeaning to lock same-sex couples out of a central institution of ...
HealthDay - 6/26/2015


'Overwhelming' Evidence That Same-Sex Parenting Won't Harm Kids: Review of thousands of studies on the issue finds broad consensus among experts
There is no evidence that having same-sex parents harms children in any way, a new comprehensive review finds. The well-being of children of same-sex couples was an issue the U.S. Supreme Court addressed in its landmark 5-4 ruling on Friday that upheld the legality of gay marriage. "Without the recognition, stability and predictability marriage offers, children suffer the stigma of knowing their families are somehow lesser," Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote in the ...
HealthDay - 6/26/2015


Therapy affects the brain of people with Tourette Syndrome
In addition to its effect on chronic tics, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can change the brain function of people with Tourette syndrome, new research confirms. Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder mainly characterized by motor and vocal tics in affected people. A tic is generally defined as a semi-voluntary movement or vocalization with no specific purpose.
ScienceDaily - 6/25/2015


Are your emotional responses normal or abnormal? Report examines the difference between normal and abnormal emotion in how we diagnose depression
We all feel emotion, we all get upset, can feel low, angry and overjoyed, but when do these emotional responses become something of a medical concern? When are these feelings inappropriate, too intense, or lasting too long? When is the emotional state you are in classed as depression? In light of the 5th revision of the influential Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM- 5), where a person can now be diagnosed as undergoing a ...
EurekAlert - 6/25/2015


Inflaming the Drive for Suicide: An analysis in Biological Psychiatry reveals link between suicide and inflammation
One American dies from suicide every 12.8 minutes, making suicide the tenth leading cause of death in the United States according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. There is consensus that if we could better predict who was at risk for suicide, then we could more effectively intervene to reduce this terrible burden on individuals, families and public health. A new analysis of existing studies strongly supports the idea that there are increased levels of ...
Elsevier - 6/24/2015


Consciousness has less control than believed, according to new theory
Consciousness -- the internal dialogue that seems to govern one's thoughts and actions -- is far less powerful than people believe, serving as a passive conduit rather than an active force that exerts control, according to a new theory proposed by an SF State researcher. Associate Professor of Psychology Ezequiel Morsella's "Passive Frame Theory" suggests that the conscious mind is like an interpreter helping speakers of different languages communicate.
San Francisco State University - 6/23/2015


Low-energy activities that involve sitting down are associated with an increased risk of anxiety, according to research published in the open-access journal BMC Public Health
These activities, which include watching TV, working at a computer or playing electronic games, are called sedentary behavior. Further understanding of these behaviors and how they may be linked to anxiety could help in developing strategies to deal with this mental health problem. Many studies have shown that sedentary behavior is associated with physical health problems like obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. However, there has ...
EurekAlert - 6/18/2015


Stress in low-income families can affect children's learning
Children living in low-income households who endure family instability and emotionally distant caregivers are at risk of having impaired cognitive abilities according to new research from the University of Rochester. The study of 201 low-income mother-child pairs, conducted at Mount Hope Family Center, tracked the levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, in the children at ages 2, 3, and 4. It found that specific forms of family adversity are linked to both elevated and ...
ScienceDaily - 6/18/2015


Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder: More than just picky eating
A new commentary by experts reflects on the clinical impact of the diagnosis of Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder, and the work that remains in terms of treatments and improved outcomes.
ScienceDaily - 6/18/2015


New research shows parental behaviour not affected by stress and anxiety of premature birth
The stress and worry of giving birth prematurely does not adversely affect a mother’s parenting behaviour, according to researchers at the University of Warwick. Preterm children often require special care in the neonatal period including incubator care or assistance with breathing. Previous research has suggested that this stress, separation and an increased tendency for depression may impair a mother’s parenting behaviour and adversely affect preterm ...
University of Warwick - 6/15/2015


U.S. Hospitals Seeing More Kids With Self-Inflicted Injuries: Cutting is the most common problem, followed by firearm injuries
A growing number of U.S. kids are landing in the ER because of self-inflicted injuries, a new study finds. Between 2009 and 2012, self-injuries accounted for a rising percentage of children's emergency room trips -- increasing from 1.1 percent to 1.6 percent of all visits. Most of the time, researchers found, the injuries were not life-threatening, and included acts such as cutting, piercing and burning. But, while the total numbers remained relatively low, experts said the ...
HealthDay - 6/15/2015


Recurrent major depressive disorder and use of antidepressants associated with lower bone density
A recent study from the University of Eastern Finland in collaboration with Deakin University, Australia, shows that recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) in men is associated with lower bone density. The use of antidepressants was also associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), but this association was dependent on the person's weight and site of bone measurement. Osteoporosis is a common disorder and an underlying factor in ...
University of Eastern Finland - 6/12/2015


More sex leads to a happier marriage, right? Maybe not
Sex is pretty great, right? So great that people think they want to have it as often as possible, seeking out advice on how to have better sex, twice-daily sex, or sex every day for a year. But what we think we want and what we really want can be very different. A surprising recent study reveals that when it comes to sex, more isn't always better. In fact, when married couples doubled the amount of sex they were having, they reported feeling unhappier.
NBC News - 6/12/2015


Psychosis Rarely Linked to Violent Crime, Study Says: Findings counter common belief about mental illness
It's rare that people with mental illness have hallucinations and delusions before they commit violent crimes, researchers say. "High-profile mass shootings capture public attention and increase vigilance of people with mental illness. But our findings clearly show that psychosis rarely leads directly to violence," said study lead author Jennifer Skeem, associate dean of research at University of California, Berkeley's School of Social Welfare.
HealthDay - 6/12/2015


The constant movement in ADHD may help children think, perform in school
The constant movement of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be distracting -- but the fidgeting also may improve their cognitive performance, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found. The take-away message: The hyperactivity seen in ADHD may help children think.
UC Davis Health System - 6/10/2015


Gun Violence Takes Toll on Kids' Mental Health, Study Finds: Even witnessing such incidents carries long-term consequences, researchers say
More than one in four children in the United States is exposed to weapon-related violence -- as a victim or witness -- which ups their risk for mental health problems, a new study says. Using 2011 data from a national survey of children and parents, researchers also estimated that one in 33 kids has been assaulted in incidents where lethal weapons -- guns and knives -- were used.
HealthDay - 6/8/2015


New knowledge about parental break-up, conflicts
Do maternal couple relationships change throughout the child-rearing years and can the likelihood of parental break-up be predicted? A new doctoral study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health has investigated these questions.
ScienceDaily - 6/3/2015


Facebook addiction linked to depression
In a small study of Facebook users in Poland, depression was one predictor of greater vulnerability to becoming dependent on using the social media site. So-called Facebook intrusion is similar to an addiction, but the emphasis is on the way a person’s relationships with others are affected. Being young, male and spending a lot of time online also predicted a greater likelihood of unhealthy dependence on Facebook.
Reuters - 6/3/2015


Pesticides Linked to ADHD, Study Says: Research found greater exposure tied to more hyperactivity and impulsivity in boys
There's evidence -- but not proof -- of a link between a commonly used household pesticide and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and young teens, according to a new study. Specifically, researchers found an association between exposure to pyrethroid pesticides and ADHD, as well as ADHD symptoms such as hyperactivity and impulsivity. The link between the pesticides and ADHD was stronger in boys than in girls, according to the findings published ...
HealthDay - 6/3/2015


Bullied Teens at Risk for Later Depression, Study Finds: Getting picked on at age 13 tied to raised odds of poor mental health at 18, U.K. researchers report
Young teens who are bullied appear to be at higher risk of depression when they reach early adulthood, according to new research. "We found that teenagers who reported being frequently bullied were twice as likely to be clinically depressed at 18 years," said Lucy Bowes, a researcher at the University of Oxford in England, who led the research.
HealthDay - 6/2/2015


Helping pregnant moms with depression doesn't help kids, study shows
A long-term study of mother-child pairs in Pakistan has found that the children turn out pretty much the same, whether or not their mothers received treatment for depression during pregnancy. An earlier study of the same population found that the mothers themselves benefited from the treatment with less depression, and demonstrating related healthy behaviors with their newborns, such as breastfeeding. But those improvements were short-lived.
ScienceDaily - 6/2/2015


Vets With PTSD Might Need Sleep Apnea Screening: Study -- Research suggests risk of nighttime breathing problem rises with severity of post-traumatic stress disorder
For U.S. veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the risk of sleep apnea increases along with the severity of the mental health condition, a new study contends. Sleep apnea -- a common sleep disorder in which breathing frequently stops and starts -- is potentially serious. Researchers looked at 195 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who visited a Veterans Affairs outpatient PTSD clinic for evaluation. About 69 percent were at high risk for obstructive ...
HealthDay - 5/29/2015


Research links impulsivity and binge eating
Do you get impulsive when you’re upset? If so, this could be putting you at risk for binge eating. According to Kelly Klump, professor of psychology at Michigan State University and senior author, the more impulsive you are, the more likely it is you’ll binge eat when experiencing negative feelings. “It’s human nature to want to turn to something for comfort after a bad day, but what our research found is that the tendency to act rashly when faced with negative emotions is a ...
Michigan State University - 5/28/2015


Better understanding of links between pain, anxiety reveals treatment opportunities
Anxiety is common in people suffering from chronic pain, and people with anxiety are more likely to suffer from chronic pain. Now researchers have found the biological basis for this link in the connections between neurons in a brain region known as the anterior cingulate cortex. Better yet, they have identified a molecule that can reduce chronic pain-related anxiety.
ScienceDaily - 5/27/2015


Heed the Warning Signs of Teen Suicide, Experts Say: Withdrawal, changes in daily habits can signal trouble
Youth suicide is a major problem in the United States, but being alert to the warning signs can help avert tragedy, experts say. Thousands of teens take their own lives every year, according to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Suicide is the third leading cause of death among 15- to 24-year-olds, and the sixth leading cause of death among 5- to 14-year-olds, the academy explained in a news release.
HealthDay - 5/26/2015


You're driving yourself to burnout, literally
Commuting length, distance, and means are stress factors that can lead to burnout, says Annie Barreck of the University of Montreal's School of Industrial Relations. “A correlation exists between commuting stress factors and the likelihood of suffering from burnout. But their importance varies according to the individual, the conditions in which their trips take place, and the place where the individual works,” she explained.
University of Montreal - 5/26/2015


Hospice May Help Ease Depression After Loss of Spouse
Hospice care may help a surviving spouse better cope with depression following the death of a loved one, a new study reports. Survivors are just as likely to be depressed following the death of their life partner whether or not hospice eased the patient's suffering and helped them pass with dignity, researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine found. But hospice care seems to provide a modest benefit in terms of a survivor's ability to recover from that depression, said lead author ...
HealthDay - 5/26/2015


Odds are that chronic gamblers are often also depressed: Study suggests impulsive boys more likely to become gambling adults
If a young man is a chronic gambler, the chances are extremely high that he also suffers from depression. This is one of the findings from a study led by Frédéric Dussault of the University of Quebec at Montreal in Canada. Published in Springer’s Journal of Gambling Studies, it is the first to investigate the extent to which gambling and depression develop hand-in-hand from the teenage years to early adulthood.
Springer - 5/21/2015


Oxytocin, Alcohol Seem to Work on Brain in Similar Ways: So-called 'love hormone' may one day help treat some psychiatric disorders, researchers say
The so-called "love hormone" oxytocin affects human behavior in much the same way as alcohol does, British researchers report. Oxytocin is a hormone involved in mother-child bonding, social interactions and romance. Previous research has shown that oxytocin boosts socially positive behaviors such as generosity, empathy and altruism, and makes people more willing to trust others, the researchers said.
HealthDay - 5/20/2015


People with depression may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease
People with depression may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, according to a large study published in the May 20, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "We saw this link between depression and Parkinson's disease during over a timespan of more than two decades, so depression may be a very early symptom of Parkinson's disease or a risk factor for the disease," said study author ...
EurekAlert - 5/20/2015


Potentially effective treatment for methamphetamine addiction identified
The first study in the United States of Naltrexone's effect on methamphetamine users has found that this medication, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of alcoholism, is potentially a very promising treatment for methamphetamine addiction, researchers report.
ScienceDaily - 5/19/2015


Are temper, anxiety, homework trouble medical issues? Many parents don’t realize it: Just half of parents of school-aged children would discuss anxiety or temper tantrums that seemed worse than peers
Parents often bring their school-aged children to check-ups or sick visits armed with questions. What should he put on that rash? What about her cough that won’t go away? But when children’s temper tantrums or mood swings are beyond the norm, or they are overwhelmed by homework organization, do parents speak up? Today’s University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health finds that many parents of children age 5-17 wouldn’t ...
University of Michigan Health System - 5/18/2015


Penn research points to omega-3 as an intervention for childhood behavioral problems
At the forefront of a field known as "neurocriminology," Adrian Raine of the University of Pennsylvania has long studied the interplay between biology and environment when it comes to antisocial and criminal behavior. With strong physiological evidence that disruption to the emotion-regulating parts of the brain can manifest in violent outbursts, impulsive decision-making and other behavioral traits associated with crime, much of Raine's research involves looking at biological ...
EurekAlert - 5/15/2015


CDC: 1 in 10 Children Diagnosed With ADHD -- Numbers remain unchanged since 2007; boys still twice as likely to have the condition as girls
One in 10 children and teens has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a new government report. That number has remained relatively steady since 2007, according to government estimates. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report offers a snapshot of how many children and teens currently have ADHD. However, it's tough to draw conclusions from this data about the reasons for the findings, said lead author ...
HealthDay - 5/14/2015


Bullying: What we know based on 40 years of research -- APA journal examines science aimed at understanding causes, prevention
A special issue of American Psychologist provides a comprehensive review of over 40 years of research on bullying among school age youth, documenting the current understanding of the complexity of the issue and suggesting directions for future research. "The lore of bullies has long permeated literature and popular culture. Yet bullying as a distinct form of interpersonal aggression was not systematically studied until the 1970s. Attention to the topic has since ...
EurekAlert - 5/14/2015


No laughing matter: some perfectionists have a dark side -- Study explores differences in humor and social behavior among three types of perfectionism
The type of perfectionist who sets impossibly high standards for others has a bit of a dark side. They tend to be narcissistic, antisocial and to have an aggressive sense of humor. They care little about social norms and do not readily fit into the bigger social picture. So says Joachim Stoeber of the University of Kent in the UK, who compared the characteristics of so-called other-oriented perfectionists against those of perfectionists who set the bar extremely high for themselves.
Springer Science+Business Media - 5/13/2015


Study Links Sleep Troubles to Children's Mental Health: Some of the problems included anxiety, depression and ADHD, researchers say
There is a link between sleep and young children's mental health, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at sleep patterns and the mental health of 1,000 children starting when they were toddlers. They found that those with sleep disorders at age 4 were at increased risk for mental health problems -- such as anxiety and depression -- at age 6. They also discovered that children with mental health problems at age 4 were at increased risk for sleep disorders at age 6.
HealthDay - 5/11/2015


Female children of service members more vulnerable to eating disorders, obesity than civilians
Adolescent female military dependents may be at higher risk than civilians for eating disorders and associated problems, according to a study that gives insight into the additional vulnerabilities of adolescent female military dependents. The study shows that they reported more disordered eating and depression than civilians.
ScienceDaily - 5/11/2015



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