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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Mothers of fussy babies at higher risk of depressive symptoms: Study explores whether a baby's level of prematurity in combination with infant fussiness may influence the severity of maternal depressive symptoms
It's no secret that fussy newborns can be especially challenging for parents already facing physical and mental exhaustion from caring for a new baby. But now science backs up the impact on parents: The less soothable the infant, the more distressed the mother. Mothers of highly irritable infants experience greater depressive symptoms, according to new University of Michigan-led research. The nationally representative study, which included data from more than 8,200 children and ...
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan - 3/25/2019


When neurons are out of shape, antidepressants may not work
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed medication for major depressive disorder (MDD), yet scientists still do not understand why the treatment does not work in nearly thirty percent of patients with MDD. Now, Salk Institute researchers have discovered differences in growth patterns of neurons of SSRI-resistant patients. The work, published in Molecular Psychiatry on March 22, 2019, has implications for depression as well as other psychiatric ...
Salk Institute - 3/22/2019


How team sports change a child's brain: Team sports associated with less depression in boys as young as 9
Adult depression has long been associated with shrinkage of the hippocampus, a brain region that plays an important role in memory and response to stress. Now, new research from Washington University in St. Louis has linked participation in team sports to larger hippocampal volumes in children and less depression in boys ages 9 to 11. "Our findings are important because they help illuminate the relationships between involvement in sports, volume of a particular brain region and ...
Washington University in St. Louis - 3/21/2019


Eating breakfast with parents is associated with positive body image for teenagers
Parents hoping to raise teenagers with positive body image might just find helpful tools in the kitchen every morning. A new study from the University of Missouri says consistently eating breakfast as a family might promote positive body image for children and adolescents. "We know that developing healthy behaviors in adolescence such as eating breakfast every day and eating family meals can have long-term effects into adulthood," said Virginia Ramseyer Winter, assistant professor in ...
University of Missouri-Columbia - 3/21/2019


Is anxiety in childhood and adolescence linked to later alcohol use disorders?
In an Addiction analysis of relevant published studies, investigators found some evidence for a positive association between anxiety during childhood and adolescence with later alcohol use disorders. Approximately 43 percent of associations were positive, meaning that anxiety was associated with a higher likelihood of later alcohol use disorders; however, 11 percent of associations were negative, with anxiety being associated with a lower likelihood of later alcohol use disorders.
Wiley - 3/20/2019


New research identifies potential PTSD treatment improvement
Researchers may have found a way to improve a common treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by changing how the brain learns to respond less severely to fearful conditions, according to research published in Journal of Neuroscience. The study by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School suggests a potential improvement to exposure therapy - the current gold standard for PTSD treatment and anxiety reduction - which helps people ...
University of Texas at Austin - 3/18/2019


Negative Emotions Can Reduce Our Capacity to Trust
It is no secret that a bad mood can negatively affect how we treat others. But can it also make us more distrustful? Yes, according to a new study, which shows that negative emotions reduce how much we trust others, even if these emotions were triggered by events that have nothing to do with the decision to trust. The study was carried out by an international research team from the University of Amsterdam (UvA) and the University of Zurich (UZH).
University of Zurich - 3/14/2019


Mental health issues increased significantly in young adults over last decade: Shift may be due in part to rise of digital media, study suggests
The percentage of young Americans experiencing certain types of mental health disorders has risen significantly over the past decade, with no corresponding increase in older adults, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. "More U.S. adolescents and young adults in the late 2010s, versus the mid-2000s, experienced serious psychological distress, major depression or suicidal thoughts, and more attempted suicide," said lead author ...
American Psychological Association - 3/14/2019


Mindfulness found to improve mental health of students: Study is first UK trial to test efficacy of therapy on medical students
Mental health amongst university students could be improved by introducing mindfulness training. These are the findings from the first UK study, published in Education Research International, to measure the efficacy of mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT) on students. Recent evidence suggests that university students are more likely to develop mental health problems when compared with the general population. The University of Bristol-led study aimed to establish whether ...
University of Bristol - 3/11/2019


Forgotten Fathers: New Dads Also at Risk for Postpartum Depression
It's increasingly common to hear about new moms suffering from the baby blues. But what about new dads? A new UNLV study, published last week in the Journal of Family Issues, offers an in-depth view of new fathers' experiences with postpartum depression (PPD). The study explores issues they encounter and how they can move beyond barriers they face in receiving diagnoses and treatment of the little-known phenomenon.
University of Nevada, Las Vegas - 3/7/2019


Social anxiety disorder may increase risk of alcoholism
New research published in Depression and Anxiety indicates that, unlike other anxiety disorders, social anxiety disorder may have a direct effect on alcoholism. For the study, researchers assessed alcoholism, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, agoraphobia, and specific phobias through interviews with 2,801 adult Norwegian twins.
Wiley - 3/6/2019


Two-thirds of pregnant women under 25 in London have a mental health problem
New research suggests two-thirds (67%) of pregnant women in London aged between 16 and 24 years have mental health problems including depression, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder, according to new research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). Anxiety disorders, in particular social phobia, are especially high. By comparison, the research suggests roughly one in five (21%) pregnant women in ...
National Institute for Health Research - 3/6/2019


Daily intake of nutritional supplements cannot prevent depression
MooDFOOD, the largest randomized clinical trial to study the effects of nutritional strategies on the prevention of major depressive disorder concludes that daily intake of nutritional supplements cannot prevent depression. Over 1000 participants who were overweight or had obesity and were identified as being at elevated risk for depression but who were not currently depressed, from four European countries -the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Germany and Spain, took part in the study.
European Association for the Study of Obesity - 3/5/2019


Maternal smoking during pregnancy increases risk of ADHD among offspring up to 3-fold
The higher the cotinine levels were in the mother’s blood during pregnancy, the greater was the child’s risk of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) later in life, showed an epidemiological study conducted by the Research Centre for Child Psychiatry at the University of Turku. Globally, it is the first study in which the connection between fetal nicotine exposure and diagnosis of ADHD was shown by measuring cotinine levels from pregnant maternal serum specimens.
University of Turku - 2/26/2019


Life's transitions easier with a sense of a well-rounded ending, new study shows
We are more likely to have positive feelings about transitioning from one stage of life to the next if we have a "well-rounded ending"--or one marked by a sense of closure--finds a team of psychology researchers. "Starting a new life phase in a positive and constructive way is often challenging, so we examined methods that could help people find a good start to a new job, a new relationship, or a new home," explains Gabriele Oettingen, a professor in New York University's Department of ...
New York University - 2/25/2019


Being surrounded by green space in childhood may improve mental health of adults
Children who grow up with greener surroundings have up to 55% less risk of developing various mental disorders later in life. This is shown by a new study from Aarhus University, Denmark, emphasizing the need for designing green and healthy cities for the future. A larger and larger share of the world's population now lives in cities and WHO estimates that more than 450 millions of the global human population suffer from a mental disorder. A number that is expected to increase.
Aarhus University - 2/25/2019


Working long hours linked to depression in women
Women who work more than 55 hours a week are at a higher risk of depression but this is not the case for men, according to a new UCL-led study with Queen Mary University of London. The study of over 20,000 adults, published today in the BMJ's Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, found that after taking age, income, health and job characteristics into account, women who worked extra-long hours had 7.3% more depressive symptoms than women working a ...
University College London - 2/25/2019


School of Public Health study links unhealthy diet to mental illness in California adults
A study has found that poor mental health is linked with poor diet quality — regardless of personal characteristics such as gender, education, age, marital status and income level. The study, published Feb. 16 in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, revealed that California adults who consumed more unhealthy food were also more likely to report symptoms of either moderate or severe psychological distress than their peers who consume a healthier diet.
Loma Linda University Adventist Health Sciences Center - 2/21/2019


Student likeability might be link between academic success and risk of depression
A new study suggests that children doing well in classrooms are more popular and emotionally secure than their peers who are having trouble academically. The research from the University of Missouri directly challenges the common stereotype that academically gifted children are considered less popular than their peers. The findings also confirm the significant impact academic performance can have on a student's mental and social well-being.
University of Missouri-Columbia - 2/20/2019


Keep calm and don't carry on when parenting teens: Researchers look at how mothers and fathers control themselves (and their rising anger) in difficult interactions with their teenagers
The field of adolescent psychology is increasingly focused on parents, with researchers asking how mothers and fathers control themselves (and their rising anger) in difficult interactions with their children. As anyone who has raised a teenager knows, parental goals often don't exactly align with those of the child. Sometimes, not even close. "Discipline issues usually peak during toddlerhood and then again during adolescence, because both periods are really marked by exploration and ...
University of Rochester - 2/19/2019


Suicide can't be predicted by asking about suicidal thoughts, major Australian study shows
The majority of people who die by suicide deny having suicidal thoughts when asked by doctors in the weeks and months leading up to their death, a ground-breaking UNSW Sydney study has found. The research questions a widely held belief that suicide can be accurately predicted by psychiatrists and clinicians by assessing a patient's risk, especially in the short-term.
University of New South Wales - 2/1/2019


Exercise may fight depression in older adults, study suggests: Physical activity promotes increased expression of 'feel-good' chemicals through muscle changes
New research suggests that exercise-induced muscle changes could help boost mood in older adults. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology--Cell Physiology. Exercise increases the expression of certain proteins (transcription factors) that help regulate gene expression and the processing (metabolism) of tryptophan in the body. Tryptophan is a mood-enhancing chemical closely related to serotonin, a substance that also affects mood. Many people ...
American Physiological Society - 1/31/2019


Persistent low body weight for young kids may place them at higher risk for anorexia nervosa later in adolescence
A new study has found that a persistent low body mass index (BMI) in children, starting as young as age 2 for boys and 4 for girls, may be a risk factor for the development of anorexia nervosa in adolescence. In addition, the study, published in the February 2019 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, found that a persistent high BMI in childhood may be a risk factor for later development of bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, and purging disorder.
University of North Carolina Health Care - 1/31/2019


New knowledge could help predict and prevent depression
In a new study, researchers from the Danish iPSYCH project demonstrate that people with the highest genetic propensity are over two and a half times as likely to be treated in a psychiatric hospital for depression compared to people with the lowest propensity. This knowledge could be utilised to strengthen preventative efforts for those who are at risk. In Denmark, 15.5 per cent of woman and nine per cent of men receive treatment for depression at a psychiatric hospital at some stage ...
Aarhus University - 1/31/2019


Data show no evidence that teens' social media use predicts depression over time
Longitudinal data from adolescents and young adults show no evidence that social media use predicts later depressive symptoms, according to research published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. However, the findings do show that relatively higher depressive symptoms predicted later social media use among adolescent girls. This research stands in contrast with recent claims that adolescents’ use of social media may lead to depression ...
Association for Psychological Science - 1/30/2019


Mental health disorders common following mild head injury: NIH-funded study identifies risk factors for neuropsychiatric conditions after concussion
A new study reveals that approximately 1 in 5 individuals may experience mental health symptoms up to six months after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), suggesting the importance of follow-up care for these patients. Scientists also identified factors that may increase the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or major depressive disorder following mild mTBI or concussion through analysis of the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury ...
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke - 1/30/2019


Your body image is impacted by those around you
Spending time with people who are not preoccupied with their bodies can improve your own eating habits and body image, according to researchers from the University of Waterloo. In a new study, researchers examined how social interactions influence body image. They found that in addition to the previous findings that being around people preoccupied with their body image was detrimental, that spending time with people who were non-body focused had a positive impact.
University of Waterloo - 1/30/2019


Recalling happy memories during adolescence can reduce risk of depression
Depression is now the leading cause of disability worldwide, affecting more than 300 million people. The condition often first emerges in adolescence, a critical developmental time period when an individual experiences substantial changes in their brain structure and chemistry. A known risk factor of depression is exposure to early life stress, such as illness, parents’ separation or death, or adverse family circumstances.
University of Cambridge - 1/14/2019


Military spouses face higher perinatal depression risk: New review shows that having a partner on deployment increases chance of psychological issues
Women whose partners are away on military deployment are at greater risk of developing mental illness during the perinatal period, according to a review paper published in the Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps. Researchers from Anglia Ruskin University's Veterans and Families Institute for Military Social Research (VFI) found that pregnant military spouses report more depressive symptoms at all stages of their pregnancy and all stages of their partner's deployment cycle.
Anglia Ruskin University - 1/14/2019


New analytic model to better identify patients likely to develop PTSD
New findings from an international research team led by psychiatrists at NYU School of Medicine show that a newly-developed analytic model can predict soon after a shocking or scary event - and with significant accuracy -- the likelihood of someone developing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Patients in the study -- who had experienced trauma ranging from traffic and workplace accidents to assaults and terrorist attacks -- were initially evaluated using the ...
NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine - 1/11/2019


Connection of children to nature brings less distress, hyperactivity and behavioral problems: Now measurable with a novel scale developed by HKU scientists
City lifestyle has been criticised for being an important reason for children being disconnected from nature. This has led to an unhealthy lifestyle in regards to active play and eating habits. Even worse, many young children do not feel well psychologically - they are often stressed and depressed. 16 per cent of pre-schoolers in Hong Kong and up to 22% in China show signs of mental health problems (Kwok SY, Gu M, Cheung AP, 2017; Zhu J, et al. 2017). Recent research shows that ...
The University of Hong Kong - 1/11/2019


Excessive social media use is comparable to drug addiction
Bad decision-making is a trait oftentimes associated with drug addicts and pathological gamblers, but what about people who excessively use social media? New research from Michigan State University shows a connection between social media use and impaired risky decision-making, which is commonly deficient in substance addiction. "Around one-third of humans on the planet are using social media, and some of these people are displaying maladaptive, excessive use of these sites," ...
Michigan State University - 1/10/2019


Child abuse linked to risk of suicide in later life
Children who experience physical, sexual, and emotional abuse or neglect are at least two to three times more likely to attempt suicide in later life, according to the largest research review carried out of the topic. The analysis of 68 studies by psychologists at the University of Manchester and University of South Wales revealed that suicide attempts were: Three times more likely for people who experienced sexual abuse as a child; Two and a half times more likely for people who ...
University of Manchester - 1/9/2019


Americans are happier in states that spend more on libraries, parks and highways: Such 'public goods' also are less likely to spark political conflict, Baylor researcher says
Americans are happier in states where governments spend more on public goods, among them libraries, parks, highways, natural resources and police protection, a Baylor University study has found. "Public goods are things you can't exclude people from using -- and one person using them doesn't stop another from doing so," said researcher Patrick Flavin, Ph.D., associate professor of political science in Baylor's College of Arts & Sciences. "They're typically not profitable to produce in ...
Baylor University - 1/7/2019


To head off late-life depression, check your hearing: The greater the hearing loss, the greater the risk of having symptoms of depression, finds study of elderly Hispanics
A new study found that elderly individuals with age-related hearing loss had more symptoms of depression; the greater the hearing loss, the greater the risk of having depressive symptoms. The findings suggest that treatment of age-related hearing loss, which is underrecognized and undertreated among all elderly, could be one way to head off late-life depression.
Columbia University Irving Medical Center - 1/2/2019


Post-natal depression in dads linked to depression in their teenage daughters
Fathers as well as mothers can experience post-natal depression - and it is linked to emotional problems for their teenage daughters, new research has found. Almost one in 20 new fathers suffered depression in the weeks after their child was born, according to a study published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry and co-authored by Professor Paul Ramchandani of the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. The research, based on a sample of more than 3,000 families in ...
University of Cambridge - 12/26/2018


Looking on Bright Side May Reduce Anxiety, Especially When Money is Tight: Effect holds over almost a decade, study says
Trying to find something good in a bad situation appears to be particularly effective in reducing anxiety the less money a person makes, possibly because people with low incomes have less control over their environment, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. “Our research shows that socioeconomic status has a powerful effect on whether reframing a situation can reduce anxiety, both in the short term and the long term,” said Claudia Haase, PhD, of ...
American Psychological Association - 12/17/2018


Strong committed relationships can buffer military suicides
Can being in a strong committed relationship reduce the risk of suicide? Researchers at Michigan State University believe so, especially among members of the National Guard. Suicide rates for members of the military are disproportionally higher than for civilians, and around the holidays the number of reported suicides often increases, for service members and civilians alike. What’s more alarming is the risk of suicide among National Guard and reserve members is even greater than ...
Michigan State University - 12/17/2018


Study suggests that increasing motor activity during the day is associated with improved spirits for healthy people, and even more so for people with type I bipolar disorder
Increasing one’s level of physical activity may be an effective way to boost one’s mood, according to a new study from a team including scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in collaboration with the National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program. The findings were published online December 12 in JAMA Psychiatry. The researchers found that increases in physical activity tended to be followed by increases in mood and perceived energy level.
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health - 12/12/2018


New approach towards an improved treatment of anxiety disorders
Traumatic experiences can become deeply entrenched in a person's memory. How can fears following a traumatic event be reduced in the long term and prevented from becoming a permanent stress-related disorder? Researchers at the Mainz University Medical Center have recently shed new light on these questions. The key to their approach lies in firmly anchoring new, positive experiences in the person's memory. As in classical treatment, traumatized patients would first have to be ...
Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz - 12/11/2018



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