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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Study reveals link between chronic childhood illness and later life mental health problems
A new study into the effects of chronic physical illness in children on their life-long mental health has found that such experiences appear to increase the chances of them having depression and anxiety in adulthood. Researchers at the University of Sussex and University College London systematically reviewed evidence from a large number of medical studies, looking for associations between eight chronic physical illnesses in childhood, such as arthritis, asthma and cancer, and ...
University of Sussex - 5/12/2017

Virtual support groups help grieving spouses with depression
As the U.S. population ages, it's estimated that half of women older than 65 are widows, while one-sixth of men of the same age have lost their spouses. Support groups have proved to be a helpful resource for those dealing with grief, but for older individuals, obstacles such as geographic location and physical immobility can sometimes make it difficult to attend support groups in person.
EurekAlert - 5/10/2017

Research Evaluates Effectiveness of Yoga in Treating Major Depression
When treating depression, the goal is to help individuals achieve full recovery and normal functioning. While traditional treatment such as medication or psychotherapy is effective for many patients, some may not fully recover even with these treatments. Researchers sought to determine if the addition of hatha yoga would improve treatment outcomes for these patients. They found that the benefits of yoga were less pronounced early in treatment, but may accumulate over time.
Care New England - 5/8/2017

Ordinary sounding expressions of teen angst may signal early depression: Research at 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting finds that teens developing depression likely to use terms such as feeling 'stressed' rather than 'depressed'
While it's estimated at least one in 10 teens in the U.S. suffer from depression at some point, few will use the word "depressed" to describe negative emotions hanging over them. Instead, new research at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting in San Francisco suggests, they're likely to use terms such as "stressed," or "down," and other words that may sound like ordinary teen angst but could be a signal of more serious, pre-depressive symptoms.
EurekAlert - 5/4/2017

Analysis: Gender differences in depression appear at age 12
An analysis just published online has broken new ground by finding gender differences in both symptoms and diagnoses of depression appearing at age 12. The analysis, based on existing studies that looked at more than 3.5 million people in more than 90 countries, confirmed that depression affects far more females than males. The study, published by the journal Psychological Bulletin, should convince doubters that depression largely, but not entirely, affects females, says co-author ...
University of Wisconsin–Madison - 4/27/2017

Staking self-worth on the pursuit of money has negative psychological consequences
Although people living in consumer-based cultures such as the U.S. often believe that they will be happier if they acquire more money, the findings of a newly published paper by a University at Buffalo research team suggest that there may be downsides to this pursuit. The pursuit of money in and of itself is not bad, but there are risks to consider when it is fueled by a desire to boost self-esteem. When people tie their self-worth to the pursuit of financial success, they are more ...
University at Buffalo - 4/27/2017

National mental-health survey finds widespread ignorance, stigma
Less than half of Americans can recognize anxiety. Most people don't know what to do about depression even when they spot it. And nearly 8 in 10 don't recognize prescription drug abuse as a treatable problem. Those are just some of the findings of a new national survey on issues surrounding mental-health literacy by Michigan State University scholars.
ScienceDaily - 4/27/2017

The Upside of Worrying: New study by UC Riverside psychology professor shows there’s a positive side to worrying
Worry — it does a body good. And, the mind as well. A new paper by Kate Sweeny, psychology professor at the University of California, Riverside, argues there’s an upside to worrying. “Despite its negative reputation, not all worry is destructive or even futile,” Sweeny said. “It has motivational benefits, and it acts as an emotional buffer.” In her latest article, “The Surprising Upsides of Worry,” published in Social and Personality Psychology Compass, Sweeny breaks down the ...
University of California, Riverside - 4/27/2017

Study finds first molecular genetic evidence of PTSD heritability
A large new study from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium provides the first molecular genetic evidence that genetic influences play a role in the risk of getting Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) after trauma. The report extends previous findings that showed that there is some shared genetic overlap between PTSD and other mental disorders such as schizophrenia. It also finds that genetic risk for PTSD is strongest among women.
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health - 4/25/2017

Parents' use of emotional feeding increases emotional eating in school-age children
Emotional eating - eating when you feel sad or upset or in response to another negative mood - is not uncommon in children and adolescents, but why youth eat emotionally has been unclear. Now a new longitudinal study from Norway has found that school-age children whose parents fed them more to soothe their negative feelings were more likely to eat emotionally later on. The reverse was also found to be the case, with parents of children who were more easily soothed by food being ...
EurekAlert - 4/25/2017

The placebo effect can mend a broken heart too, CU Boulder study shows
Feeling heartbroken from a recent breakup? Just believing you’re doing something to help yourself get over your ex can influence brain regions associated with emotional regulation and lessen the perception of pain. That’s the takeaway from a new CU Boulder study that measured the neurological and behavioral impacts the placebo effect had on a group of recently broken-hearted volunteers. “Breaking up with a partner is one of the most emotionally negative experiences a person ...
University of Colorado Boulder - 4/24/2017

Smartphone addiction leads to personal, social, workplace problems: Females more susceptible to addiction, new research shows
Excessive smartphone use leads to problems, and females are especially susceptible to addiction, according to new research from Binghamton University- State University of New York. "Our smartphones have turned into a tool that provides short, quick, immediate satisfaction, which is very triggering," said Isaac Vaghefi, assistant professor of management information systems at Binghamton University-State University of New York. "Our neurons get fired and dopamine is ...
Binghamton University - 4/12/2017

Maternal stress during pregnancy could influence the biological clock for ageing
The stress that some mothers experience during their pregnancies could influence the genetic makeup their babies are born with and, eventually, lead to premature biological ageing and associated age-related diseases. This is according to lead authors Tabea Send and Stephanie Witt of the Central Institute of Mental Health, University of Heidelberg in Germany. The study is published in Springer Nature’s journal Neuropsychopharmacology and focuses on a person’s DNA sequences ...
Springer - 4/11/2017

Religiosity does not increase the risk of anorexia nervosa
Religiosity has been associated with various forms of fasting and self-starvation for thousands of years. Many believe that extreme religiosity can be a risk factor of anorexia nervosa. However, a recent population study conducted in Finland showed that religiosity does not increase the risk of anorexia nervosa.
University of Helsinki - 4/11/2017

Can dealing with emotional exhaustion enhance happiness?
The study examined when and how dealing with emotional exhaustion can enhance happiness in a work environment. The research was focused on the role of perceived supervisor support (PSS) - the workers’ view of their manager’s level of supportiveness, caring and appreciation for their efforts – in stimulating ways to cope with exhaustion.
University of East Anglia - 4/11/2017

Interpersonal abuse in early life may lead to concentration issues later in life: Stressors encountered may change a person's brain
Does a history of abuse before the age of 18 affect later capacity to concentrate and stay focused? According to a new study Veterans with a history of physical or sexual abuse or witnessing family violence before the age of 18 have a reduced ability to concentrate compared to Veterans who were not abused. The study, which appears in the journal Brain and Behavior, revealed that this failure to concentrate was associated with abnormal connectivity in the brain, between the amygdala, ...
EurekAlert - 4/10/2017

Study reverses thinking on genetic links to stress, depression: Scientists re-examine data exploring connection between serotonin gene, depression, stress
For years, scientists have been trying to determine what effect a gene linked to the brain chemical serotonin may have on depression in people exposed to stress. But now, analyzing information from more than 40,000 people who have been studied over more than a decade, researchers led by a team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found no evidence that the gene alters the impact stress has on depression.
Washington University School of Medicine - 4/4/2017

A staged approach to depression diagnosis could improve communication and treatment
A staged model of depression, ranging from wellness to distress to disorder, could make it easier for diverse groups to talk about depression and has the potential to improve the study of potential depression treatments, argues Vikram Patel of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine in London, UK, in an Essay in PLOS Medicine in advance of World Health Day 2017. Around the world, the vast majority of people with depression don't seek care for their symptoms and don't ...
EurekAlert - 4/4/2017

Psychologists enlist machine learning to help diagnose depression
Depression affects more than 15 million American adults, or about 6.7 percent of the U.S. population, each year. It is the leading cause of disability for those between the ages of 15 and 44. Is it possible to detect who might be vulnerable to the illness before its onset using brain imaging? David Schnyer, a cognitive neuroscientist and professor of psychology at The University of Texas at Austin, believes it may be. But identifying its tell-tale signs is no simpler matter. He is using the ...
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center - 3/27/2017

Video Games a Viable Treatment for Depression
Video games and “brain training” applications are increasingly touted as an effective treatment for depression. A new UC Davis study carries it a step further, though, finding that when the video game users were messaged reminders, they played the game more often and in some cases increased the time spent playing. “Through the use of carefully designed persuasive message prompts … mental health video games can be perceived and used as a more viable and less attrition-ridden ...
University of California, Davis - 3/27/2017

Researchers propose new diagnostic model for psychiatric disorders
A consortium of 50 psychologists and psychiatrists from around the world has outlined a new diagnostic model for mental illness, in what researchers hope will be a paradigm shift in how these illnesses are classified and diagnosed.
University of Notre Dame - 3/23/2017

Streamlined analysis could help people better manage their emotions
The many strategies people use to manage their emotions fall into three core groupings, according to newly published research from the University at Buffalo. Since a lot of psychopathology is related to difficulty in regulating emotions, the findings can potentially benefit researchers and clinicians trying to better understand and treat a range of psychological disorders, everything from anxiety to substance abuse, by streamlining assessment and giving people the tools necessary to more ...
University at Buffalo - 3/22/2017

Getting rid of depression by changing how you think
A thought is a thought. It does not reflect reality. New research shows that learning how to ruminate less on thoughts and feelings has a positive effect for individuals with depression. Depressed individuals “don’t need to worry and ruminate,” says Professor Roger Hagen in NTNU’s Department of Psychology. “Just realizing this is liberating for a lot of people.”
Norwegian University of Science and Technology - 3/13/2017

Childhood bullying may lead to increased chronic disease risk in adulthood
Being bullied during childhood might have lifelong health effects related to chronic stress exposure--including an increased risk for heart disease and diabetes in adulthood, according to a research review in the March/April issue of the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. Recent advances in understanding of the negative health effects of chronic stress highlight a pressing need to clarify the longer-term health implications of childhood bullying, according to the review ...
EurekAlert - 3/10/2017

Poor sleep in early childhood may lead to cognitive, behavioral problems in later years
A study led by a Massachusetts General Hospital pediatrician finds that children ages 3 to 7 who don't get enough sleep are more likely to have problems with attention, emotional control and peer relationships in mid-childhood. Reported online in the journal Academic Pediatrics, the study found significant differences in the responses of parents and teachers to surveys regarding executive function -- which includes attention, working memory, reasoning and problem solving -- and ...
ScienceDaily - 3/9/2017

Probiotic found in yogurt can reverse depression symptoms in mice, UVA finds
Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have reversed depression symptoms in mice by feeding them Lactobacillus, a probiotic bacteria found in live-cultures yogurt. Further, they have discovered a specific mechanism for how the bacteria affect mood, providing a direct link between the health of the gut microbiome and mental health. Based on their findings, the researchers are optimistic that their discovery will hold true in people and are planning to confirm their ...
University of Virginia Health System - 3/8/2017

Even after treatment, brains of anorexia nervosa patients not fully recovered: Researchers find their brains remain altered, need time to normalize
Even after weeks of treatment and considerable weight gain, the brains of adolescent patients with anorexia nervosa remain altered, putting them at risk for possible relapse, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. The study, published last week in the American Journal of Psychiatry, examined 21 female adolescents before and after treatment for anorexia and found that their brains still had an elevated reward system compared to 21 participants ...
EurekAlert - 3/1/2017

What happens when patients access their mental health providers' notes? Veterans Affairs study identifies factors that build or break trust
Thanks to electronic health records and online portals, more and more patients are being given access to the notes their clinicians write about their health care visits. Research suggests this national movement, known as "OpenNotes," can empower patients and boost communication and shared decision-making. But what about mental health visits? Experts have been unsure whether this area is equally likely to benefit. Now, a small study from one Veterans Affairs medical center offers ...
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs - 3/1/2017

Study Finds New Link Between Childhood Abuse and Adolescent Misbehavior:
An important learning process is impaired in adolescents who were abused as children, a University of Pittsburgh researcher has found, and this impairment contributes to misbehavior patterns later in life. Associative learning — the process by which an individual subconsciously links experiences and stimuli together — partially explains how people generally react to various real-world situations. In a newly released study, published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, ...
University of Pittsburgh - 2/28/2017

Watching birds near your home is good for your mental health: People living in neighborhoods with more birds, shrubs and trees are less likely to suffer from depression, anxiety and stress
People living in neighbourhoods with more birds, shrubs and trees are less likely to suffer from depression, anxiety and stress, according to research by academics at the University of Exeter, the British Trust for Ornithology and the University of Queensland. The study, involving hundreds of people, found benefits for mental health of being able to see birds, shrubs and trees around the home, whether people lived in urban or more leafy suburban neighbourhoods. The study, which ...
EurekAlert - 2/24/2017

Same-Sex Marriage Legalization Linked to Reduction in Suicide Attempts Among High School Students
The implementation of state laws legalizing same-sex marriage was associated with a significant reduction in the rate of suicide attempts among high school students – and an even greater reduction among gay, lesbian and bisexual adolescents, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. The researchers, publishing Feb. 20 in JAMA Pediatrics, estimate that state-level same-sex marriage policies were associated with more than 134,000 fewer ...
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health - 2/20/2017

How depression can muddle thinking
Depression is associated with sadness, fatigue and a lack of motivation. But people with depression can also have trouble processing information and solving problems. Now scientists studying a rat model for depression are identifying on a molecular level how the condition could affect thinking. The findings, published in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, could lead to the development of new depression treatments that would address associated cognitive problems.
American Chemical Society - 2/15/2017

Depression symptoms among men when their partners are pregnant
Men who were stressed or in poor health had elevated depression symptoms when their partners were pregnant and nine months after the birth of their child, according to the results of a study of expectant and new fathers in New Zealand published online by JAMA Psychiatry. The research by Lisa Underwood, Ph.D., of the University of Auckland, New Zealand, and coauthors follows up on their studies of perinatal depression in mothers.
ScienceDaily - 2/15/2017

Study reveals surprising link between athletics and addiction: Work-hard, play-hard culture may put elite athletes at higher risk of substance abuse, researcher finds
As she was planning her study to look into the role physical activity and sport play in the development of substance addiction, Laurie de Grace was forewarned that she may have trouble finding any recovering addicts with a sporting background to speak with. After all, sport and physical activity go hand in hand with good mental health—or so conventional wisdom would suggest. “Instead, what we found is with addiction, the more risks that are present, the greater ...
University of Alberta - 2/13/2017

Want to help your partner deal with depression? Try a little tenderness: Easing your romantic partner’s stress can boost their mental health later, study shows
The more depressed your romantic partner may be, the more love you should give them, according to new University of Alberta research. It can be tempting to pull back, but tough as it may be, helping your loved one stick it out through a bout of depression can help their future mental health, said relationships researcher Matthew Johnson. “Efforts from a partner to help alleviate stress may prevent the development or worsening of mental health problems and, in fact, could help keep the ...
University of Alberta - 2/8/2017

PTSD Symptoms May Be Prevented With Ketamine: Study in mice shows drug’s potential to prevent PTSD in soldiers and others likely to experience psychological trauma
Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have found that a single dose of ketamine, given one week before a stressful event, can buffer against a heightened fear response. The study, conducted in mice, suggests that prophylactic administration of ketamine—a drug commonly used as a general anesthetic or a rapid-acting antidepressant—might prevent post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in soldiers and others who subsequently experience psychological ...
Columbia University Medical Center - 2/8/2017

Psychotherapy normalizes the brain in social phobia
Psychotherapy is a central treatment for social anxiety disorder. Due to this treatment, changes in key brain structures involved in emotion processing and regulation are normalized, as researchers from the University of Zurich, Zurich University Hospital and the University Hospital of Psychiatry Zurich demonstrate in a new study.
University of Zurich - 2/6/2017

Easier to let go – can depression help people deal with life? Patients with depression find it easier to abandon unattainable goals, psychological study shows
"If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!" This saying is drummed into us from a young age, when our tower of building blocks keeps collapsing or we just can't get the hang of riding a bicycle. Perseverance is praised and we are told that only with the right motivation will we be able to achieve the aims we have set ourselves. "That may hold true in many areas of life, such as work, sport or the family," says Prof. Klaus Rothermund of Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany). But ...
Friedrich Schiller University, Jena - 2/2/2017

Early signs of anxiety, depression may be evident in newborns: Brain scans may indicate clues to later problems
Early predictors of anxiety and depression may be evident in the brain even at birth, suggests a study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Analyzing brain scans of newborns, the researchers found that the strength and pattern of connections between certain brain regions predicted the likelihood of the babies developing excessive sadness, shyness, nervousness or separation anxiety by age 2. Such symptoms have been linked to clinical depression and ...
Washington University School of Medicine - 2/2/2017

Antidepressants Induce Resilience and Reverse Susceptibility
When they work, antidepressant medications may take weeks or months to alleviate symptoms of depression. Progress in developing new and more effective antidepressant treatments has been limited, though a new study offers new insights into how antidepressants work.
ScienceDaily - 2/2/2017

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