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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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School absenteeism and early behavioral problems in kindergarten
At least 5% of children and adolescents in Germany are in need of psychiatric treatment. Diagnostic investigation for behavioral problems is indicated in another 10% to 18%. Two articles in Deutsches Ärzteblatt International go into the questions of what interventions help children who are avoiding school, and whether providing support for social and emotional skills can improve prosocial behavior in preschool children.
EurekAlert - 10/14/2015


Different types of child abuse: similar consequences - In the long run, emotional abuse might hurt a child as much as violence or neglect
Emotional abuse may be as harmful as physical abuse and neglect. This finding led by a team of researchers at McGill University complements previous imaging research showing that emotional and physical pain both activate the same parts of the brain. Emotional abuse, which includes behaviors such as ridicule, intimidation, rejection, and humiliation, is much more common than physical abuse and neglect. Worldwide prevalence estimates suggest that approximately ...
McGill University - 10/14/2015


Most teen mood swings decline with age
Adolescence is typically regarded as a period of heightened emotionality. Although the teen years are an important time for youth to learn to regulate their emotions, little research has looked at the development of teens' emotional stability. Now a new longitudinal study has found that adolescents' mood swings decline gradually as they get older, which should reassure parents about their moody teens while also helping identify when instability is considered risky and ...
EurekAlert - 10/14/2015


In a negative emotional climate, romantic partners may miss attempts to warm things up!
A new University of Illinois study reports that when conflict occurs in romantic relationships, the negative emotional climate that results hinders a person’s ability to recognize their partner’s attempts to reach out to them. “When we evaluate relationship maintenance in couples, the important measure is not what’s actually happening in the relationship but how those persons perceive their partner’s efforts. That perception creates the climate in which attempts at ...
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences - 10/13/2015


Prescription Painkiller Abuse Rate Down, But Many Are Addicted: Second study finds 80 percent of abusers don't get treatment for their addiction
The percentage of American adults who are abusing prescription narcotic painkillers has dipped slightly in the last decade, a new survey reveals. That's the good news. The bad news: Those who do abuse these powerful drugs are doing so more frequently and they are more likely to become addicted.
HealthDay - 10/13/2015


Brain scans could predict patients at risk of major depression
Scientists studying people with depression say brain scans could be used to predict who is most likely to relapse, an approach that could help doctors make better decisions about who should stay on antidepressants and who should stop. In a small study of 64 patients, the researchers found that significant differences showed up in brain scans of those who later went on to have a recurrence of their depression.
Reuters - 10/7/2015


Face-to-Face Contact May Beat Email, Phone for Staving Off Depression: Older people who spent more time communicating in person showed fewer symptoms of mood disorder
While your days may be filled with electronic communications, a new study suggests that face-to-face contact might have more power to keep depression at bay -- at least if you're older. The research doesn't prove that personal conversations are more valuable than email and phone calls. Still, study author Dr. Alan Teo, a staff psychiatrist at VA Portland Health Care System in Oregon, is convinced there's a connection.
HealthDay - 10/6/2015


Psychostimulants More Likely to Reduce Rather Than Worsen Anxiety in Children with ADHD
A new review of studies involving nearly 3,000 children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) concludes that, although anxiety has been reported as a side-effect of stimulant medication, psychostimulant treatment for ADHD significantly reduces the risk of anxiety.
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. - 10/6/2015


Grades May Sink for Girls Who Are Compulsive Texters: But similar link with poor school performance wasn't seen for boys
Compulsive texting can lead to poor school performance for teenage girls, a new study suggests. "It appears that it is the compulsive nature of texting, rather than sheer frequency, that is problematic," said lead researcher Kelly Lister-Landman, who was at Chestnut Hill College in Pennsylvania when the study was conducted.
HealthDay - 10/6/2015


Gut bacteria population, diversity linked to anorexia nervosa: Studying the 'gut-brain axis,' researchers find evidence of an association
Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine found that people with anorexia nervosa have very different microbial communities residing inside their guts compared to healthy individuals and that this bacterial imbalance is associated with some of the psychological symptoms related to the eating disorder.
ScienceDaily - 10/5/2015


Happy head, happy heart: Positive emotions may promote heart-healthy behaviors
People with heart disease may benefit from maintaining positive emotions, according to health researchers. The researchers assessed psychological well-being of participants at baseline and again at a five-year follow-up by asking the participants to rate the extent that they had felt 10 specified positive emotions, including "interested," "proud," "enthusiastic" and "inspired." Physical activity, sleep quality, medication adherence and alcohol and cigarette use were also ...
ScienceDaily - 10/5/2015


Many women experience 'post-sex blues'
Very few studies on female sexual dysfunction have looked at postcoital dysphoria (PCD), or "post-sex blues," which is characterized by tearfulness, a sense of melancholy or depression, anxiety, agitation, or aggression following sexual intercourse. Among 230 female university students who completed an online survey, 46% of respondents reported experiencing PCD symptoms at least once in their lifetime, with 5.1% experiencing PCD symptoms a few times within ...
EurekAlert - 10/5/2015


Secondhand Smoke Linked to Behavior Issues in Kids: Risk is greatest among children exposed both in the womb and at a young age, study suggests
Early exposure to secondhand smoke may lead to behavioral problems in children, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data from more than 5,200 primary school students in France and found that those exposed to secondhand smoke while in the womb and/or at a young age were at higher risk for behavioral problems, particularly emotional and conduct disorders.
HealthDay - 10/1/2015


Depression Adds to Burden of Alzheimer's Caregivers, Study Finds: For spouses already depressed when their loved one was diagnosed, their stress only grew
Depression increases the mental strain on people caring for loved ones recently diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, a new study finds. The study included spouses and other family caregivers of 236 people in Finland who were diagnosed with very mild or mild Alzheimer's disease. The caregivers were followed for three years after their loved ones were diagnosed.
HealthDay - 10/1/2015


Relationship Quality Affects Siblings’ Mental Health, Risky Behaviors
Latinos are the fastest-growing ethnic minority group in the United States, and most are of Mexican origin, previous research has shown. The Latino culture, more than others, places a high value on the family unit; yet, little research has examined the dynamics of Latino family relationships and how those dynamics affect children’s development. Now, a University of Missouri researcher found sibling relationship quality in adolescence affects Mexican-origin ...
University of Missouri-Columbia - 9/30/2015


Insight on how a new class of antidepressants works
The experimental drugs target brain cells’ ability to respond to the chemical messenger glutamate, however, it has been unclear how they work. The recent discovery of a molecular amplification system helps explain how the drugs achieve an antidepressant effect by altering signaling in particular neurons.
ScienceDaily - 9/30/2015


New research about shopping addiction
A group of researchers at the Faculty of Psychology at the University of Bergen (UiB) have developed a new and unique method to measure shopping addiction: The Bergen Shopping Addiction Scale. The new method is based on core addiction elements recognised as diagnostic criteria for other addictions, and is the first of its kind worldwide.
University of Bergen - 9/29/2015


Therapy Can Prevent Anxiety in Children, Study Says
A woman who won’t drive long distances because she has panic attacks in the car. A man who has contamination fears so intense he cannot bring himself to use public bathrooms. A woman who can’t go to church because she fears enclosed spaces. All of these people have two things in common: they have an anxiety disorder. They’re also parents. Each of these parents sought help because they struggle with anxiety, and want to prevent their children from ...
University of Connecticut - 9/25/2015


Sleep Apnea May Raise Risk of Depression: Study suggests popular apnea treatment could help ease symptoms of mood disorder
People with sleep apnea are at increased risk for depression, but continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for their apnea may ease their depression, a new study suggests. The Australian study included 293 men and women who were newly diagnosed with sleep apnea. Nearly 73 percent had depression when the study began. The worse their apnea, the more severe their depression.
HealthDay - 9/25/2015


Bullied Teens Who Exercise May Lower Suicide Risk, Study Finds: But researcher adds that many U.S. schools have cut opportunities for physical activity
Regular exercise may lower bullied teens' risk of suicide, researchers report. The researchers analyzed data from more than 13,500 U.S. high school students and found that being physically active four or more days a week reduced bullied teens' suicidal thoughts and attempts by 23 percent. The researchers also found that about 30 percent of bullied teens said they had felt sad for two or more weeks in the previous year; 22 percent thought about suicide; and more than ...
HealthDay - 9/25/2015


Gene Tied to Adult Depression After Childhood Abuse: But the same DNA variant is linked to more happiness in people without such abuse histories, researchers say
Even though survivors of childhood physical or sexual abuse can face a higher risk for depression as adults, not everyone will become depressed. Now, new Australian research points to DNA as a potential factor in determining who will suffer depression later on. Scientists say they've spotted a gene variant that appears to raise the odds of depression in adults who suffered childhood abuse.
HealthDay - 9/24/2015


Adolescent brain may be especially sensitive to new memories, social stress, and drug use
Adolescence, like infancy, has been said to include distinct sensitive periods during which brain plasticity is heightened; but in a review of the neuroscience literature published on September 23 in Trends in Cognitive Sciences, University College London (UCL) researchers saw little evidence for this claim. However, a small number of studies do support that memory formation, social stress, and drug use are processed differently in the adolescent brain compared to other ..
EurekAlert - 9/23/2015


Parents Should Be Involved in Teen's Bulimia Treatment: Recovery is faster when family is part of therapy, researchers find
Teens with bulimia recover faster when their parents are involved in their treatment, new research reports. Traditionally, parents have been excluded from the treatment and counseling of teens with bulimia, the researchers said. But, the study's authors found that having parents play a role in their children's treatment was ultimately more effective.
HealthDay - 9/18/2015


Workplace bullying may increase risk of suicidal thoughts
Workers who are victims of bullying on the job may become more likely to contemplate suicide than people who don’t experience a hostile office environment, a Norwegian study suggests. Researchers surveyed a nationally representative sample of roughly 1850 workers and followed them from 2005 to 2010. While less than five percent of participants reported thoughts of suicide during the study period, they were about twice as likely to do so after being victims of workplace bullying.
Reuters - 9/18/2015


Being Sigmund Freud ... and giving oneself excellent advice because of it
The illusion of being in another body affects not only our perception (as is already known) but also our way of thinking. Thanks to virtual reality, some subjects embodied Sigmund Freud and proved better at giving themselves psychological advice compared to when they were simply themselves.
ScienceDaily - 9/17/2015


Fruit and vegetables aren't only good for a healthy body -- they protect your mind too
Eating a Mediterranean diet or other healthy dietary pattern, comprising of fruit, vegetables, legumes, and nuts and low in processed meats, is associated with preventing the onset of depression, according to research published in the open access journal BMC Medicine. A large study of 15,093 people suggests depression could be linked with nutrient deficits.
EurekAlert - 9/16/2015


Immune system may be pathway between nature and good health
Research has found evidence that spending time in nature provides protections against a startling range of diseases, including depression, diabetes, obesity, ADHD, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and many more. How this exposure to green space leads to better health has remained a mystery. After reviewing hundreds of studies examining nature’s effects on health, University of Illinois environment and behavior researcher Ming Kuo believes the answer lies in nature’s ...
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences - 9/16/2015


Mindfulness meditation linked to false memory recall
Published in the journal Psychological Science, the study suggests individuals who engage in mindfulness meditation may have less accurate memories than those who do not take part in the practice. "This is especially interesting given that previous research has primarily focused on the beneficial aspects of mindfulness training and mindfulness-based interventions," notes first author Brent M. Wilson, of the Department of Psychology at the University of California-San Diego.
Medical News Today - 9/15/2015


Study finds young people on antidepressants more prone to violence
Young people taking antidepressants such as Prozac and Seroxat are significantly more likely to commit violent crimes when they are on the medication, but taking higher doses of the drugs appears to reduce that risk, scientists said on Tuesday. In research published in the PLoS Medicine journal, the scientists said that while their finding of a link does not prove that such drugs cause people to be more violent, further studies should be conducted and extra warnings may ...
Reuters - 9/15/2015


The sinister science of addiction
Deaths by drug overdose -- particularly for heroin, which is sweeping across small-town America -- are on the rise. But as the latest video from the American Chemical Society's Reactions series explains, addiction -- to drugs, alcohol, or any other destructive habit -- doesn't come as the result of some personal failing. It's the result of some pretty serious brain chemistry.
The Washington Post - 9/14/2015


ADHD May Mask Autism in Young Kids: This might lead to delay in getting the right diagnosis and treatment, experts say
Symptoms attributed to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may overshadow or mask autism spectrum disorder in very young children, a new study reveals. This can create a significant delay in the diagnosis of autism. It took an average of three years longer to diagnose autism in children initially thought to have just ADHD, the researchers said.
HealthDay - 9/14/2015


Homophobic people often have psychological issues
Homophobic attitudes may say a lot about the person who holds them, new research suggests. A new study of university students in Italy revealed that people who have strongly negative views of gay people also have higher levels of psychoticism and inappropriate coping mechanisms than those who are accepting of homosexuality.
Fox News - 9/14/2015


Social media pressure may lead to anxiety, depression in teens
New research sheds light on teenagers' use of social media, suggesting the pressure to be online 24 hours a day disrupts their sleep patterns and may lead to mental health problems, such as anxiety and depression. The research team - including Dr. Heather Cleland Woods and Holly Scott from the University of Glasgow in the UK - recently presented their findings at The British Psychological Society (BPS) Developmental and Social Psychology Section Annual Conference in ...
Medical News Today - 9/12/2015


Higher fish consumption linked to reduced risk of depression
A high intake of fish is frequently regarded as being part of a healthy diet. Now, researchers suggest that eating a large amount of fish could also reduce the risk of depression. The meta-analysis, published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, looked at data from relevant studies published between 2001 and 2014. "Higher fish consumption may be beneficial in the primary prevention of depression," the authors write. "Future studies are needed to ...
Medical News Today - 9/11/2015


Premenstrual dysphoric disorder -- review looks at treatment effectiveness
Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a severe form of premenstrual syndrome that causes major disruption in several areas of life for many women. Many treatment options have been proposed, but which are most effective? A comprehensive review of the evidence, including specific treatment guidelines, is presented in the September Journal of Psychiatric Practice, published by Wolters Kluwer.
EurekAlert - 9/9/2015


How can one assess the effectiveness of hypnosis?
Although hypnosis has existed for hundreds of years, today it is still difficult to clearly judge its usefulness in the medical domain. In a report submitted to the French Directorate General for Health, researchers from Inserm led by Bruno Falissard assessed the effectiveness of this complementary medical practice for some of its indications (women’s health, digestive ailments, surgery, psychiatry, etc.). The latter illustrates its therapeutic value during anaesthesia, and in the ...
Inserm - 9/9/2015


Mothers Help Daughters Obtain Positive Body Image
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) research demonstrates how mothers’ emphasis on the many aspects of well being, fitness and a sense of self-fulfillment helps to counteract the innumerable “ideal” body images seen and heard by their daughters in the mass media. The new study published in Feminism and Psychology focuses on how mothers instilled resilience in their daughters to combat body dissatisfaction, which can lead to eating disorders.
American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev - 9/9/2015


A new factor in depression? Brain protein discovery could lead to better treatments
Low. Down. Less than normal. That’s what the word depression means, and what people with depression often feel like. But sometimes, depression can mean too much of something – as new research shows. The discovery, about a protein called fibroblast growth factor 9 or FGF9, goes against previous findings that depressed brains often have less of key components than non-depressed brains. In this case, people with major depression had 32 percent more ...
University of Michigan Health System - 9/8/2015


Link between insomnia, control of emotion
People who are losing the ability to regulate their emotions may be more likely to suffer from insomnia. And if they do, that insomnia is more likely to become persistent, research suggests. Researchers surveyed 2333 adult members of the general public in Sweden. They were asked to complete a series of questionnaires on emotional regulation and a series on insomnia. The researchers found that a reduced ability to regulate emotions was associated with ...
ScienceDaily - 9/8/2015


One-Third of U.S. Kids With ADHD Diagnosed Before Age 6: But researchers add that few valid tests exist to support diagnosis in children that young
Almost a third of U.S. children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were diagnosed before the age of 6, even though there aren't many valid tests to support diagnosis in children that young, a new federal government report shows. It's difficult to determine whether the results show overdiagnosis of ADHD or not, said Joel Nigg, director of the division of psychology at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland.
HealthDay - 9/3/2015



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