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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Community matters in suicide prevention, study finds: Risks arise from culture, social connectedness in town with suicide clusters
Community characteristics play an important role in perpetuating teen suicide clusters and thwarting prevention efforts, according to a new study by sociologists at the University of Chicago and University of Memphis who examined clusters in a single town. The study, published in the American Sociological Review, illustrates how the homogeneous culture and high degree of social connectedness of a community can increase suicide risk, particularly among teenagers. Such conditions ...
University of Chicago - 9/9/2016


Borderline personality disorder -- as scientific understanding increases, improved clinical management needed
Even as researchers gain new insights into the neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD), there's a pressing need to improve diagnosis and management of this devastating psychiatric condition. A scientific and clinical research update on BPD is presented in the September/October special issue of the Harvard Review of Psychiatry, published by Wolters Kluwer.
EurekAlert - 9/8/2016


Parents' Psychiatric Issues May Adversely Affect Some Children: History of antisocial disorder, suicide attempt or marijuana abuse showed the most effect, study authors say
Some children of parents with a history of psychiatric illness may be at higher risk for attempting suicide and/or engaging in violent behavior, a new Danish study suggests. Danes born to parents who had themselves attempted suicide, or who had struggled with antisocial personality disorder or marijuana abuse, were found to face the biggest risk for attempted suicide or violence -- up to four times as high, the study contended.
HealthDay - 9/1/2016


An insecure childhood can make dealing with stress harder
Imagine two candidates at a high stakes job interview. One of them handles the pressure with ease and sails through the interview. The other candidate, however, feels very nervous and under-performs. Why do some people perform better than others under emotionally stressful conditions? The clue might lie in early childhood experiences, a recent study published in the open access online journal, Frontiers in Human Neuroscience found.
Frontiers - 8/31/2016


Connection between chronic pain, anxiety disorders found by researchers
New study results provide insight into a long-observed, but little-understood connection between chronic pain and anxiety and offer a potential target for treatment. Researchers found that increased expression of PACAP -- a peptide neurotransmitter the body releases in response to stress -- is also increased in response to neuropathic pain and contributes to these symptoms.
ScienceDaily - 8/31/2016


Bipolar adolescents continue to have elevated substance use disorder risk as young adults
A follow up to a previous study finding an association between adolescent bipolar disorder and the incidence of cigarette smoking and substance use disorder finds that risk was even greater five years later, particularly among those with persistent bipolar symptoms. The report from a team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators, published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, also finds evidence that the presence of conduct disorder, in combination with bipolar disorder, may ...
Massachusetts General Hospital - 8/30/2016


Less than a Third of Adults with Depression Receive Treatment: Among those who get treatment, less than half see a mental health specialist
New findings suggest that most Americans with depression receive no treatment, while raising the possibility that overtreatment of depression is also widespread. Less than a third of American adults who screened positive for depression received treatment for their symptoms, whereas over two-thirds of adults receiving treatment for depression did not report symptoms of depression or serious psychological distress, according to a study from Columbia University Medical Center ...
Columbia University Medical Center - 8/29/2016


How do antidepressants trigger fear and anxiety?
More than 100 million people worldwide take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as Prozac and Zoloft, to treat depression, anxiety and related conditions, but these drugs have a common and mysterious side effect: they can worsen anxiety in the first few weeks of use, which leads many patients to stop treatment. Scientists at the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Medicine have mapped out a serotonin-driven anxiety circuit that may explain this side effect and ...
University of North Carolina - 8/24/2016


We are all 'wired' for addiction, says researcher
Drug addicts and non-addicts may have more in common than ever thought, according to a researcher at Texas A&M University who found that to some degree, everyone's brain is "wired" to become addicted. In "What is Abnormal About Addiction-Related Attentional Biases?" an article in press in Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Psychology Professor Brian Anderson argues that normal people show many of the same biases as people who are addicted to drugs.
ScienceDaily - 8/24/2016


Unhealthy diet during pregnancy could be linked to ADHD
New research led by scientists from King's College London and the University of Bristol has found that a high-fat, high-sugar diet during pregnancy may be linked to symptoms of ADHD in children who show conduct problems early in life. Published today in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, this study is the first to indicate that epigenetic changes evident at birth may explain the link between unhealthy diet, conduct problems and ADHD.
EurekAlert - 8/18/2016


Depression Common After Time Spent in ICU: About one-third of ICU patients suffer psychologically, researchers find
One-third of former intensive care unit (ICU) patients have depression, a new review finds. Each year, more than 5 million seriously ill patients are admitted to ICUs in the United States. Rates of depression following discharge are far greater for these patients than for the general population, according to the study.
HealthDay - 8/17/2016


When you don't feel valued in a relationship, sleep suffers
We spend up to one-third of our life asleep, but not everyone sleeps well. For couples, it turns out how well you think your partner understands and cares for you is linked to how well you sleep. The results are published in Social Personality and Psychological Science. "Our findings show that individuals with responsive partners experience lower anxiety and arousal, which in turn improves their sleep quality," says lead author Dr. Emre Selçuk, a developmental and social psychologist at ...
ScienceDaily - 8/17/2016


Meds May Curb Risky Behaviors for Kids With ADHD: Study found drug abuse, STDs and injuries were lower among teens who take meds
Despite concerns that the stimulants used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) might raise the risk of drug abuse, new research suggests the medications are linked with less risky behaviors in teens. The research finds that ADHD medications are "effective in reducing the probability of these events," said study co-author Anna Chorniy, a postdoctoral associate at Princeton University in New Jersey.
HealthDay - 8/17/2016


College students who misuse stimulants more likely to have ADHD, substance-use disorder
A new study by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators finds that college students who misuse stimulant drugs are more likely to have attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), conduct disorder or substance-use disorder than are students not misusing stimulants. The report published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry also finds immediate-release stimulants are more likely to be misused than extended-release versions of the drugs.
Massachusetts General Hospital - 8/8/2016


Activating dopamine neurons could turn off binge-like eating behavior
While binge eating affects about 10 percent of adults in the United States, the neurobiological basis of the disease is unclear. Researchers at the USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital found that certain neural circuits have the ability to inhibit binge-like eating behavior in mice. Their report appears in the journal Biological Psychiatry.
ScienceDaily - 8/8/2016


Got sleep? The amount you get could affect your marital mindset
A new study by two Florida State University researchers found that when husbands and wives get more sleep than on an average night, they are more satisfied with their marriages, at least the following day. The research was conducted by FSU Psychology Professor Jim McNulty and graduate student Heather Maranges. "The universality of our findings is important," Maranges said. "That is, we know all people need sleep. Regardless of the stage at which a couple is in their relationship or ...
ScienceDaily - 8/6/2016


New study links risk factors to variations in postpartum depression
A new study shows that depression following childbirth can begin at different times and follow multiple distinct trajectories, emphasizing the need for clinicians to monitor for signs of postpartum depression and be aware of risk factors that may predispose a new mother to depression. The study, ")," is published in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
EurekAlert - 8/3/2016


Maintaining healthy relationships: University of Waterloo studies identify a promising way
Thinking about the future helps overcome relationship conflicts, according to a University of Waterloo study just published online in Social Psychological and Personality Science. “When romantic partners argue over things like finances, jealousy, or other interpersonal issues, they tend to employ their current feelings as fuel for a heated argument. By envisioning their relationship in the future, people can shift the focus away from their current feelings and mitigate conflicts,” ...
University of Waterloo - 7/28/2016


Are Unemployed Husbands Fueling Divorce Rates? Finding challenges common belief that women entering workforce in greater numbers was to blame
Contrary to common belief, a new U.S. study suggests that women's growing role in the workforce is not a major factor in divorce. But a husband's ability to keep a full-time job might be. The study, of over 6,300 U.S. couples, found that the odds of divorce were no different whether a wife worked full-time or not. Instead, it was husbands' full-time employment -- or lack thereof -- that made a significant difference. The findings stand in stark contrast to a popular notion -- that ...
HealthDay - 7/28/2016


Why do antidepressants take so long to work?
An episode of major depression can be crippling, impairing the ability to sleep, work, or eat. But the drugs available to treat depression can take weeks or even months to start working. Researchers have discovered one reason the drugs take so long to work, and their finding could help scientists develop faster-acting drugs in the future.
ScienceDaily - 7/28/2016


ADHD medication reduces risky behavior in children, teens
New research provides some of the first evidence that medications taken by millions of American children to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) offer long-term benefits. Based on an analysis of Medicaid claims for nearly 150,000 children diagnosed with ADHD in South Carolina between 2003 and 2013, researchers including Princeton University postdoctoral associate Anna Chorniy found treatment with ADHD medication made children less likely to ...
Princeton University - 7/27/2016


Lack of Sleep Increases a Child's Risk for Emotional Disorders Later: NIH-funded Study Reveals Long-term Emotional Effects of Poor Sleep
When asked how lack of sleep affects emotions, common responses are usually grumpy, foggy and short-tempered. While many jokes are made about how sleep deprivation turns the nicest of people into a Jekyll and Hyde, not getting enough shut-eye can lead to far more serious consequences than irritability, difficulty concentrating and impatience.
University of Houston - 7/22/2016


Behavioural Activation as effective as CBT for depression, at lower cost
A simple and inexpensive therapy is equally as effective at treating depression as the “gold standard” of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), a largescale study has concluded. Behavioural Activation (BA) is relatively simple, meaning it can be delivered by more junior staff with less training, making it a cost-effective option. It is around 20 per cent cheaper than CBT, meaning it could help ease current difficulties in accessing therapy, and could make it more realistic to deliver for a ...
University of Exeter - 7/22/2016


One-third of students report elevated psychological distress, survey shows: Screen time, social media use and problem gaming are on the rise
More than one in three -- an estimated 328,000 -- students in grades seven to 12 report moderate-to-serious psychological distress, according to new survey results in Ontario, Canada. Girls are twice as likely as boys to experience psychological distress, the study indicates.
ScienceDaily - 7/21/2016


Gay, lesbian and bisexual youth have higher rates of disordered eating behaviours: UBC study
Sexual minority boys and girls are more likely to purge or take laxatives, use diet pills, or fast to lose weight than their straight peers, and those disordered eating trends may not be improving, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. The study, which analyzed data from youth ages 12 to 18, found disparities in the rate of these behaviours between sexual minority teens and heterosexual youth. Although disordered eating behaviours appear to be declining for ...
University of British Columbia - 7/21/2016


One-third of women with ADHD have anxiety disorders, almost half have considered suicide
Women with ADHD are much more likely to have a wide range of mental and physical health problems in comparison to women without ADHD, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto. "The prevalence of mental illness among women with ADHD was disturbingly high with 46% having seriously considered suicide, 36% having generalized anxiety disorder, 31% having major depressive disorder and 39% having substance abuse problems at some point in their life," ...
EurekAlert - 7/20/2016


Do ADHD Medicines Boost Substance Abuse Risk? Chances were actually lower the earlier stimulants were started, and the longer they were taken
Parents often worry that their children who take stimulants to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at higher risk for substance abuse later. Now, a surprising new study finds that risk was actually lower when medicines such as Ritalin and Adderall were started earlier and taken longer. "Most notably, the risk of substance use in adolescents who had been treated at an earlier age and for a longer duration with stimulant ADHD medications was the same as for the ...
HealthDay - 7/15/2016


Study Points to Fast-Acting Drug for OCD
A single chemical receptor in the brain is responsible for a range of symptoms in mice that are reminiscent of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), according to a Duke University study that appears online in the journal Biological Psychiatry. The findings provide a new mechanistic understanding of OCD and other psychiatric disorders and suggest that they are highly amenable to treatment using a class of drugs that has already been investigated in clinical trials.
Duke University - 7/15/2016


Students' PTSD symptoms fluctuate greatly during first year of college: Most see symptoms moderate, but alcohol consumption can make improvement less likely
A new University at Buffalo study is helping researchers better understand how post-traumatic stress disorder fluctuates in students during their first year of college. The segment of the young adult population with PTSD is particularly at risk for problem drinking and other harmful behaviors that can potentially exacerbate symptoms, according to Jennifer Read, a professor in UB's Department of Psychology and corresponding author of the paper published in the journal Psychological Trauma: ...
University at Buffalo - 7/13/2016


New antidepressant target discovered: Manipulating novel target could lead to new treatments
Northwestern Medicine scientists have shown how manipulating a novel target in the brain using gene therapy could lead to new treatments for depression. The investigators showed decreasing a set of proteins called HCN channels reduced depression-like behavior in mice. If replicated in humans, the findings could inform fresh therapies for millions of patients who do not respond to existing treatments for depression. "Drugs currently available for treating depression help most patients, but ...
EurekAlert - 7/12/2016


Metabolic syndrome linked to sexual dysfunction in older women: Postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome report lower sexual activity, desire, and sexual satisfaction, according to a new report in The American Journal of Medicine
Understanding the effects of age and disease on sexual wellbeing is crucial as sexual health is increasingly associated with vitality. In a new study published in The American Journal of Medicine, researchers looked at the role metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease play in postmenopausal women's sexual health. They found that metabolic syndrome was strongly associated with decreased sexual activity, desire, and sexual satisfaction and that specific cardiovascular events were ...
EurekAlert - 7/12/2016


Are narcissists addicted to social networking?
Social networking sites such as Facebook provide the ideal environment for some types of narcissists to promote themselves and seek the admiration of others on a grand scale, according to a study published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking website until August 7, 2016.
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. - 7/7/2016


Link between stress hormone and obesity in depressed and bipolar patients
Low levels of the stress hormone cortisol are linked to obesity, high levels of fat in the blood and metabolic syndrome among patients with recurrent depressions or bipolar disorder. This according to a study at Umeå University in Sweden published in the Journal of Affective Disorders. "These results provide clues to better understand the high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases in people with recurrent depressions or bipolar disorder.
EurekAlert - 7/4/2016


New study examines Freud's theory of Hysteria
New research from King’s College London has studied the controversial Freudian theory that Hysteria, a disorder resulting in severe neurological symptoms such as paralysis or seizures, arises in response to psychological stress or trauma. The study, published today in Psychological Medicine, found supportive evidence that stressors around the time of onset of symptoms might be relevant for some patients. This research is the first to robustly assess this key theory on what is now known as ...
King’s College London - 7/4/2016


Trauma induces more alcohol craving than stress among veterans with PTSD and co-occurring alcohol dependence
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol dependence (AD) are two of the most common and debilitating disorders diagnosed among American military veterans. AD and PTSD often occur together, and this co-occurrence has a worse prognosis than either disorder alone. Alcohol craving is related to relapse, but the relationship between PTSD symptoms, craving, and relapse is not well understood. This study is the first to explore the effects of trauma-induced and stress-induced imagery ...
ScienceDaily - 7/1/2016


3 Treatments Seem to Help Combat Binge-Eating Disorder: Review finds these methods may aid those with the most common eating disorder in the U.S.
New research finds that people struggling with binge-eating disorder -- America's most common, yet likely least-known eating disorder -- may have at least three treatment options to help them curtail their eating. People diagnosed as chronic binge eaters can benefit from cognitive-behavioral therapy, a form of therapy that helps patients understand the reasons behind their actions. That understanding can then help them change their behavior, said study lead author Kimberly Brownley. She's an ...
HealthDay - 6/30/2016


Helicopter parents: Hovering may have effect as kids transition to adulthood
As thousands of young adults prepare to leave the nest and attend college for the first time, parents may want to examine whether they are kind and supportive or hovering into helicopter parent territory. Parental involvement is crucial to a child’s development into an adult, but Florida State University researchers are finding that crossing the line between supportive and too involved could indirectly lead to issues such as depression and anxiety for young adults.
Florida State University - 6/28/2016


Not only trauma but also the reversal of trauma is inherited
Behaviors caused by traumatic experiences in early life are reversible. Researchers could demonstrate that environmental enrichment allows trauma-related symptoms in mice to be reversed. This is the first evidence that positive environmental factors can correct behavioral alterations which would otherwise be transmitted to the offspring. The symptoms and their reversal are associated with epigenetic regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor gene.
University of Zurich - 6/23/2016


Impulsive children raised in caring families drink less during adolescence
Years of research have shown that impulsivity in childhood is among the individual vulnerabilities leading to substance abuse, delinquency, as well as aggressive and antisocial behavior in adolescence and adulthood. However, a new study shows that impulsive children who were raised in less coercive families at the age of 6 actually drank less alcohol than their less impulsive peers at the age of 15.
ScienceDaily - 6/22/2016


Psychiatric diagnostic tools may not be valid for African-Americans
Depression in African Americans, according to Sirry Alang, assistant professor of sociology and anthropology at Lehigh University, is expressed in ways that are inconsistent with symptoms of depression laid out in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V). The DSM-V is the primary source of diagnostic information, relied upon by not only clinicians and researchers, but also psychiatric drug regulation agencies, health insurance companies, pharmaceutical ...
EurekAlert - 6/22/2016



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