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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Depression linked to memory problems and brain aging
Depression in older adults may be linked to memory problems, according to a study published in the May 9, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also showed that older people with greater symptoms of depression may have structural differences in the brain compared to people without symptoms. "Since symptoms of depression can be treated, it may be possible that treatment may also reduce thinking and memory ...
American Academy of Neurology - 5/9/2018


At-risk adolescents are less likely to express depression on social media as they age
Findings from a new study reveal at-risk adolescents are less likely to post about depressive symptoms on social media as they age. The research suggests that adolescents with a diagnosis of depression may feel less stigmatized describing depressed mood on social media than previously hypothesized. The research will be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2018 Meeting in Toronto. Social media use can provide important information on the mental health of ...
Pediatric Academic Societies - 5/5/2018


Daily photography improves wellbeing: Taking a photo each day and posting it online has complex benefits
Taking a photo each day and posting it online has complex benefits say researchers who say it supports improved wellbeing. This is a popular social phenomenon, with Instagram having over 1.5million photos tagged #365 for each day of the year while there are thousands of members of Blipfoto, a key photo-a-day site. A study co-authored by Dr Liz Brewster of Lancaster University and Dr Andrew Cox of the University of Sheffield recorded what photos people took, what text they ...
Lancaster University - 4/30/2018


Parents may help prep kids for healthier, less violent relationships
Warm, nurturing parents may pass along strategies for building and maintaining positive relationships to their kids, setting them up for healthier, less-violent romantic relationships as young adults, according to researchers. Researchers found that when adolescents reported a positive family climate and their parents using more effective parenting strategies -- like providing reasons for decisions and refraining from harsh punishments -- those adolescents tended to go on to have better ...
Penn State - 4/27/2018


Unprecedented study identifies 44 genetic risk factors for major depression
A global research project has mapped out the genetic basis of major depression, identifying 44 genetic variants which are risk factors for depression, 30 of which are newly discovered. The study, by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium and co-led in the UK by King's College London, is the largest study to-date of genetic risk factors for major depression.
King's College London - 4/26/2018


Maternal binge drinking linked to mood problems and alcohol abuse in offspring: Study shows for first time that binge drinking during pregnancy and lactation may make offspring more vulnerable to mood disturbances and alcohol abuse as adolescents
Binge drinking by pregnant and lactating mothers can impair the mental health of their offspring, reports a study published today in Frontiers in Psychiatry. In a rat model, Italian researchers find that while habitual drinking is associated with anxiety type of behaviors in mothers and their offspring, intermittent or binge drinking has a depressive effect. Moreover, offspring of binge-drinking mothers were less responsive to natural stimuli, showed greater "despair" behavior, and were more ...
Frontiers - 4/25/2018


New studies show dark chocolate consumption reduces stress and inflammation: Data represent first human trials examining the impact of dark chocolate consumption on cognition and other brain functions
New research shows there might be health benefits to eating certain types of dark chocolate. Findings from two studies being presented today at the Experimental Biology 2018 annual meeting in San Diego show that consuming dark chocolate that has a high concentration of cacao (minimally 70% cacao, 30% organic cane sugar) has positive effects on stress levels, inflammation, mood, memory and immunity. While it is well known that cacao is a major source of flavonoids, ...
Loma Linda University Adventist Health Sciences Center - 4/24/2018


Study shows cognitive behavioural therapy can improve emotion regulation in children with autism
New research from York University’s Faculty of Health shows cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can help children with autism manage not only anxiety but other emotional challenges, such as sadness and anger. Led by Jonathan Weiss, associate professor in the Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health and CIHR Chair in Autism Spectrum Disorders Treatment and Care Research, the study shows CBT can lead to significant improvements in children’s emotional regulation.
York University - 4/24/2018


More than 1 in 20 US children and teens have anxiety or depression
About 2.6 million American children and adolescents had diagnosed anxiety and/or depression in 2011-12, reports an analysis of nationwide data in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. The number of children with diagnosed anxiety - but not depression - has increased in recent years, according to the new report.
Wolters Kluwer Health - 4/24/2018


Engaging in physical activity decreases people's chance of developing depression
An international team including researchers from King's College London have found physical activity can protect against the emergence of depression, regardless of age and geographical region. The researchers from Brazil, Belgium, Australia, USA, UK and Sweden pooled data from 49 unique cohort studies of people free from mental illness that examined if physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of developing depression.
King's College London - 4/24/2018


Volunteering Reduces Loneliness In Widowed Older Adults, Study Finds
Widowed older adults can reduce the loneliness that results from the death of a spouse by volunteering 100 hours per year, which is about two hours per week, according to a recent study. The study examined whether becoming a volunteer at the time of widowhood is associated with reducing the risks of loneliness, which is a significant public health concern, particularly for those who have lost a spouse, linked to poorer physical health, depression and even earlier mortality.
Georgia State University - 4/16/2018


Depression study pinpoints genes that may trigger the condition
Nearly 80 genes that could be linked to depression have been discovered by scientists. The findings could help explain why some people may be at a higher risk of developing the condition, researchers say. The study could also help researchers develop drugs to tackle mental ill-health, experts say. Depression affects one in five people in the UK every year and is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Life events - such as trauma or stress - can contribute to its onset, but it is not ...
University of Edinburgh - 4/16/2018


Raw fruit and vegetables provide better mental health outcomes: Otago research
That is the simple message from University of Otago researchers who have discovered raw fruit and vegetables may be better for your mental health than cooked, canned and processed fruit and vegetables. Dr Tamlin Conner, Psychology Senior Lecturer and lead author, says public health campaigns have historically focused on aspects of quantity for the consumption of fruit and vegetables (such as 5+ a day). However, the study, just published in Frontiers in Psychology, found that ...
University of Otago - 4/15/2018


Mental disorders among leading causes of illness in children worldwide
While global rates of mental disorders in children have remained stable over time, the decline of infectious diseases will place mental disorders among the main causes of disease in children aged 4-15 years, according to a study published in the open access journal Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health.
BioMed Central - 4/11/2018


Digital addiction increases loneliness, anxiety and depression
Smartphones are an integral part of most people’s lives, allowing us to stay connected and in-the-know at all times. The downside of that convenience is that many of us are also addicted to the constant pings, chimes, vibrations and other alerts from our devices, unable to ignore new emails, texts and images. In a new study published in NeuroRegulation, San Francisco State University Professor of Health Education Erik Peper and Associate Professor of Health Education Richard Harvey ...
San Francisco State University - 4/11/2018


Marriage Reduces Depression in Couples Earning Less Than $60,000, Study Finds
People who are married and earning less than $60,000 per year in total household income have fewer symptoms of depression than comparable earning unmarried people, but for couples earning more, marriage doesn’t show the same mental health benefits, according to a study co-authored by a Georgia State University researcher. According to this study, people who have never been married and earn more than $60,000 a year have fewer symptoms of depression than comparable ...
Georgia State University - 4/10/2018


School-based yoga can help children better manage stress and anxiety: Researchers worked with a public school to add yoga and mindfulness activities to help third-graders screened for anxiety at the beginning of the school year
Participating in yoga and mindfulness activities at school helps third-graders exhibiting anxiety improve their wellbeing and emotional health, according to a new Tulane University study published in the journal Psychology Research and Behavior Management. Researchers worked with a public school in New Orleans to add mindfulness and yoga to the school's existing empathy-based programming for students needing supplementary support. Third graders who were screened for ...
Tulane University - 4/10/2018


Self-rating mental health as 'good' predicts positive future mental health
Researchers have found that when a person rates their current mental health as 'positive' despite meeting criteria for a mental health problem such as depression, it can predict good mental health in the future, even without treatment. Using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, Sirry Alang of Lehigh University and her co-authors, Donna D. McAlpine of the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, and Ellen McCreedy of Brown University, sampled people who met the criteria for ...
Lehigh University - 4/2/2018


Linking teen driving behaviors to ADHD, other mental health factors
Teenage drivers ages 16 to 19 are three times more likely to get into fatal accidents than their older counterparts. In this age group, around 20 percent in the United States have been affected by symptoms associated with mental health disorders, including 9 percent with a lifetime history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). What’s the relationship between these well-documented conclusions? That’s what Penn nursing researcher Catherine McDonald wanted to find out.
University of Pennsylvania - 3/30/2018


Study finds children with autism and ADHD at higher risk for anxiety
Children with both autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk for being diagnosed with or treated for anxiety and mood disorders, according to a study published in Pediatrics today. The study, completed by the Interactive Autism Network (IAN), is one of the largest to compare comorbidities in individuals with ASD alone to individuals with ASD and ADHD. For the study's findings, researchers from Kennedy Krieger Institute ...
GolinHarris DC - 3/30/2018


Is Knee Pain Linked to Depression?
In the U.S., about 13 percent of women and 10 percent of men aged 60 or older have knee pain due to osteoarthritis (OA). Osteoarthritis occurs when a joint becomes inflamed, usually because the protective cartilage and other tissues that cushion joints like the knee become damaged and worn over time. Knee pain from OA can make it harder to take care of yourself, which can damage your quality of life. In turn, that can lead to depression.
American Geriatrics Society - 3/23/2018


Stopping exercise can increase symptoms of depression
Stopping exercise can result in increased depressive symptoms, according to new mental health research from the University of Adelaide. PhD student Julie Morgan from the University of Adelaide’s Discipline of Psychiatry has reviewed the results of earlier studies that examined the effects of stopping exercise in regularly active adults. The results of her review are now published online ahead of print in the Journal of Affective Disorders. "Adequate physical activity and exercise are ...
University of Adelaide - 3/22/2018


Children with physical disabilities are at higher risk of poor mental health
A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that even children with limited physical disabilities are at risk of developing mental issues later in life. Girls and adolescents from socio-economically vulnerable families are at greatest risk. The study was published in the reputable journal PLOS ONE. With the help of national register data, Lund researchers conducted a follow-up of more than 600 000 children, with Swedish parents, born during the period 1987-1993. Of these, ...
Lund University - 3/22/2018


Study identifies effective parenting strategies to reduce disruptive behavior in children
Most parenting programs aim to teach parents how to reduce their children's disruptive behavior. New research looked at more than 150 studies of these programs, finding differences in what works best according to whether or not children already showed behavior problems. The work was conducted by researchers at the University of Amsterdam, Cardiff University, University of Oxford, and Utrecht University. It appears in the journal Child Development, a publication of the Society for ...
Society for Research in Child Development - 3/20/2018


Certain Antidepressants More Effective in Treating Youth Anxiety Disorder
For children and adolescents who require medication to treat anxiety, there are two primary classes of antidepressants that are prescribed: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). Now, University of Cincinnati (UC) research, published online ahead of the April issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry shows for the first time that SSRIs may be the more effective option.
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center - 3/19/2018


Suicide Risk for Youth Sharply Higher in the Months after Self-Harm
A study led by Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) revealed that young Americans had a sharply higher risk of suicide in the months after surviving a deliberate self-harm attempt. The authors say the findings, published online today in Pediatrics, underscore the need to direct clinical interventions toward youth who survive such attempts during this critical period. “Our latest study shows that time is of the essence in preventing a nonfatal self-harm event from leading to ...
Columbia University Medical Center - 3/19/2018


Which skills will help patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder? New research shows sufferers of obsessive-compulsive disorder lack adaptive coping skills
Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a complex psychological condition, and those who suffer from it experience severe reduction in their quality of life. A new study in Springer’s journal Cognitive Therapy and Research now shows that OCD sufferers need to adopt adaptive coping skills rather than the maladaptive strategies often used such as repetitive, compulsive actions or creating emotional distance from a situation, in order to effectively manage their condition. The research ...
Springer - 3/16/2018


Early Periods Tied to Mental Health Issues Into Adulthood
Mental health problems can last into adulthood for girls who start having their periods at an early age, a new study suggests. Previous research had found that girls with early periods have more frequent and severe mental health disorders, such as depression, anxiety and eating disorders. They're also more prone to substance abuse, delinquency and failing or dropping out of school. How long these problems usually last, though, has been unclear.
HealthDay - 3/9/2018


Exposure to childhood violence linked to psychiatric disorders
Investing in diminishing socioeconomic status inequalities and in preventing violent events during childhood may improve the mental health of youths from low socioeconomic status backgrounds, according to a study conducted by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and Federal University of São Paulo. The results showed that having experienced any traumatic event and low socioeconomic status were associated with an internalizing disorder such as ...
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health - 3/8/2018


Depression, anxiety high in graduate students, survey shows
Graduate students are more than six times as likely to experience depression and anxiety as compared to the general population, according to a comprehensive survey of 2,279 individuals conducted via social media and direct email. The research team including Teresa Evans, Ph.D., and Lindsay Bira, Ph.D., of UT Health San Antonio describe their results in the March issue of the journal Nature Biotechnology. The survey included clinically validated scales for anxiety and depression.
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio - 3/7/2018


Feeling anxious? Blame the size of your waistline! New study links waist-to-height ratio to anxiety in middle-aged women
Anxiety is one of the most common mental health disorders, and it's more likely to affect women, especially middle-aged women. Although anxiety can be caused by many factors, a new study suggests that the amount of abdominal fat a woman has could increase her chances of developing anxiety. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).
The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) - 3/7/2018


New study finds couples do poorly at knowing when their partner is sad or feeling down: Spouses are the primary source of social support to one another, so it's important to their relationship they stay attuned to each other's emotions
How well do couples pick up on one another’s feelings? Pretty well, when the emotion is happiness, says a psychologist at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. But a new study finds that couples do poorly when it comes to knowing their partner is sad, lonely or feeling down. “We found that when it comes to the normal ebb and flow of daily emotions, couples aren’t picking up on those occasional changes in ‘soft negative’ emotions like sadness or feeling down,” said family psychologist ...
Southern Methodist University - 3/6/2018


People with depression have stronger emotional responses to negative memories
People with major depressive disorder (MDD) feel more negative emotion when remembering painful experiences than people without the disorder, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. The study reports that people with MDD were able to control the negative emotions about as well as people unaffected by MDD, but used somewhat different brain circuits to do so. The findings identify brain differences in MDD related to processing of ...
Elsevier - 3/6/2018


New research points to better way to treat depression
Scientists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered a new target for treating major depressive disorder, a disease that affects more than 16 million American adults. Their research shows that individuals with high levels of an enigmatic receptor called GPR158 may be more susceptible to depression following chronic stress. "The next step in this process is to come up with a drug that can target this receptor," says Kirill Martemyanov, PhD, co-chair of ...
ScienceDaily - 3/1/2018


Teachers and other school-based professionals can treat children's mental health problems: Broad evidence now supports the potential of school-based services for the treatment of a wide range of child mental health problems
School-based services delivered by teachers and other school-based professionals can help reduce mental health problems in elementary-aged children, reports a study published in the March 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP). "Given the limited accessibility of traditional mental health services for children--particularly for children from minority and economically disadvantaged backgrounds--school-based mental ...
Elsevier - 3/1/2018


Moms who co-sleep beyond six months may feel more depressed, judged
Recent trends and popular advice telling moms not to sleep with their babies may make mothers who do choose to co-sleep with their infants more likely to feel depressed or judged, according to Penn State researchers. After analyzing moms’ sleeping patterns and feelings about sleep for the first year of their babies’ lives, the researchers found that mothers who were still co-sleeping— sharing either a room or bed — with their infants after six months were more likely to feel depressed, ...
Penn State - 2/28/2018


DASH-Style Diet Associated With Reduced Risk of Depression: Diet emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy products
Eating a diet that emphasizes vegetables, fruit and whole grains may lead to a reduced risk of depression, according to a study by researchers at Rush University Medical Center. Study author Dr. Laurel Cherian will present a preliminary study abstract with these conclusions during the American Academy of Neurology’s annual meeting in April. Study participants who closely adhered to a diet similar to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet were less likely to develop ...
Rush University Medical Center - 2/26/2018


Microbiota-gut-brain axis is at epicenter of new approach to mental health
The functional gut microbiome provides an exciting new therapeutic target for treating psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and trauma-related conditions. Innovative methods for studying and intervening in gut microbiome composition and activity to treat mental illness and maintain mental health are presented in a timely review article that is part of the “Microbiome Special Issue: Food, Drugs, Diagnostics, and Built Environments” of OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology, the ...
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News - 2/26/2018


Self-compassion may protect people from the harmful effects of perfectionism
Relating to oneself in a healthy way can help weaken the association between perfectionism and depression, according to a study published February 21, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Madeleine Ferrari from Australian Catholic University, and colleagues. Perfectionistic people often push themselves harder than others to succeed, but can also fall into the trap of being self-critical and overly concerned about making mistakes. When the perfectionist fails, they often experience ...
PLOS - 2/21/2018


Self-esteem key to treating mental health
Improving how mental health patients perceive themselves could be critical in treating them, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. The study found that youth with psychiatric disorders currently receiving inpatient services reported lower self-concept, particularly global self-worth, compared to those receiving outpatient services. "This was the first study that examined youth with psychiatric disorder by comparing what type of service they were receiving and whether that ...
University of Waterloo - 2/20/2018



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