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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Everything is not fine: Kids can tell when parents suppress their stress
Stress is common in a family setting, especially when people are spending so much time together under stay-at-home measures meant to slow the spread of COVID-19. New research finds that parents suppressing feelings of stress around their kids can actually transmit those feelings to the children. In a paper published in Journal of Family Psychology, Sara Waters, assistant professor in Washington State University’s Department of Human Development, and her colleagues studied ...
Washington State University - 4/23/2020


What helps couples weather financial storms
Experts have predicted that the COVID-19 pandemic will result in the worst financial crisis in the United States since the Great Depression. While the full scope of the financial fallout remains to be seen, furloughs, job losses and pay cuts resulting from the outbreak have already hit many people hard, and such financial challenges can put a significant strain on romantic relationships. Some couples may be better equipped to manage that kind of stress than others, suggests research by ...
University of Arizona - 4/21/2020


In wake of COVID-19 pandemic, a crashing wave of neuropsychiatric problems?
In an article posted online April 13, 2020 in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, a trio of researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine suggest that in the aftermath of the novel coronavirus pandemic, a host of neuropsychiatric challenges may remain -- or emerge -- for those recovering from COVID-19 infections. "Past pandemics have demonstrated that diverse types of neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as encephalopathy, mood changes, psychosis, ...
University of California - San Diego - 4/14/2020


More than a third of medical staff suffered insomnia during the COVID-19 epidemic in China: Healthcare workers with sleeplessness were more likely to feel depressed and anxious, and researchers identified certain factors that implied increased risk
The novel coronavirus that has infected more than one million people globally (at time of publication) is not just a physical health threat. A first-of-its-kind study published in Frontiers in Psychiatry found that more than a third of medical staff responding to the outbreak during its peak in China suffered from insomnia. The healthcare workers who experienced sleeplessness were also more likely to feel depressed, anxious and have stress-based trauma, according to the paper.
Frontiers - 4/14/2020


The Mental Health Consequences of COVID-19 and Physical Distancing: The Need for Prevention and Early Intervention
Since the first case of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was diagnosed in December 2019, it has swept across the world and galvanized global action. This has brought unprecedented efforts to institute the practice of physical distancing (called in most cases “social distancing”) in countries all over the world, resulting in changes in national behavioral patterns and shutdowns of usual day-to-day functioning. While these steps may be critical to mitigate the spread of this disease, ...
JAMA Network - 4/10/2020


Working together to combat mental health challenges during COVID-19 pandemic
This article offers lessons from Hubei, China, on potential methods to focus on mental health during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.
JAMA Psychiatry - 4/10/2020


New treatment for childhood anxiety works by changing parent behavior
A study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that an entirely parent-based treatment, SPACE (Supportive Parenting for Anxious Childhood Emotions), is as efficacious as individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of childhood and adolescent anxiety disorders. Anxiety disorders, including social phobia, separation anxiety, generalized anxiety, are the most common mental health ...
Elsevier - 4/2/2020


Validation may be best way to support stressed out friends and family
In uncertain times, supporting your friends and family can help them make it through. But your comforting words can have different effects based on how you phrase them, according to new Penn State research. The researchers studied how people responded to a variety of different messages offering emotional support. They found that messages that validated a person's feelings were more effective and helpful than ones that were critical or diminished emotions.
Penn State - 3/26/2020


Mental health plays key role in battling pandemic and its accompanying effects: Tips for staying healthy in mind, body and spirit during social distancing and challenging times
By now we all should know the physical guidance that’s been given related to ways to dodge or slow down the novel coronavirus: practice good hygiene, wash your hands and avoid close contact with others. But as Penn Staters across Pennsylvania and beyond complete their first week of remote learning, telecommuting and social distancing, some may be feeling overwhelmed, disconnected or even fearful. That’s all to be expected and completely normal, said Benjamin Locke, ...
Penn State - 3/20/2020


‘Feeling obligated’ can impact relationships during social distancing
In a time where many are practicing “social distancing” from the outside world, people are relying on their immediate social circles more than usual. Does a sense of obligation – from checking on parents to running an errand for an elderly neighbor – benefit or harm a relationship? A Michigan State University study found the sweet spot between keeping people together and dooming a relationship. “We were looking to find whether obligation is all good or all bad,” said William Chopik, ...
Michigan State University - 3/19/2020


Bad sleep habits can depress teens: Links to negative thoughts and perfectism
Nagging negative thoughts - and striving for perfection - keep teenagers awake at night, raising their chance of becoming depressed and anxious, a new study shows. An online study of almost 400 adolescents aged 14 to 20 years confirmed the link, leading sleep researchers at Flinders University to recommend alternative treatments for repetitive negative thinking and perfectionism in dealing with delayed sleep and mental health problems among teenagers.
Flinders University - 3/18/2020


If you hunker down against coronavirus, don't stop reaching out, experts say
As more communities deal with outbreaks of COVID-19, those at risk are being advised to stay home and stock up to protect themselves. But experts say the need to hunker down does not mean people shouldn't reach out to help. "When there's a time of anxiety, that is not a time to pull back from connectedness," said Dr. Franklin Watkins, associate professor in geriatric medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Health in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. "That's a time that we actually need to ...
American Heart Association News - 3/13/2020


Preterm Babies Are More Likely to Be Diagnosed with Reactive Attachment Disorder
Premature birth, low birth weight, and neonatal intensive care are associated with the risk of being diagnosed with reactive attachment disorder (RAD) showed a study by the Research Centre for Child Psychiatry of the University of Turku, Finland. Reactive attachment disorder causes problems in emotional bonding, social interaction, and expression of emotions, and it can lead to severe and expensive consequences later in life. The disorder will impair child’s ability to function in ...
University of Turku - 3/12/2020


Healthier and happier without Facebook: People who reduce the time they spend on Facebook smoke less, are more active and feel better all round
Two weeks of 20 minutes less time per day on Facebook: a team of psychologists from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) invited 140 test persons to participate in this experiment. Lucky those who took part: afterwards they were more physically active, smoked less and were more satisfied. Symptoms of addiction regarding Facebook usage decreased. These effects continued also three months after the end of the experiment. The group headed by Dr. Julia Brailovskaia published their results in ...
Ruhr-University Bochum - 3/12/2020


Getting on With Your Life in the Age of Coronavirus
As coronavirus continues to spread across America, people in some areas are quarantined. Conferences, sporting events and travel plans are being called off, while hand sanitizer and toilet paper is flying off the shelves. Short of finding a well-stocked bunker, how can you learn to live with this new normal? An important key to living with the looming threat of this virus is flexibility, experts say. "You have to be willing to change as the situation changes, and it's likely to keep changing ...
HealthDay - 3/11/2020


Kids who blame themselves for mom’s sadness are more likely to face depression and anxiety
"Even if she doesn't say it, I know it's my fault that my mother gets sad." Kids who believe comments like this - assuming blame for their mom's sadness or depression - are more likely to face depression and anxiety themselves, a new study led by SMU has found. "Although mothers with higher levels of depressive symptoms face increased risk that their children will also experience symptoms of depression and anxiety, our study showed that this was not the case for all children," ...
Southern Methodist University - 3/11/2020


Knowing more about a virus threat may not satisfy you: New study on Zika virus has implications for coronavirus
People who rate themselves as highly knowledgeable about a new infectious disease threat could also be more likely to believe they don't know enough, a new study suggests. In the case of this study, the infectious disease threat was the Zika virus. But the authors of the new study, published recently in the journal Risk Analysis, say the results could apply to the recent novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. "The Zika virus and the coronavirus have important things in common," ...
Ohio State University - 3/10/2020


Depressed, rural moms face greater health challenges—and so do their kids
Research at Washington State University has linked chronic depression with increased health problems for moms and children in poor rural communities, revealing the need for better treatment based on teamwork and trust. Using data from the ongoing, multi-state Rural Families Speak project, a team led by Yoshie Sano, associate professor in WSU's Department of Human Development, examined the experiences of 23 mothers with clinical depression across three years.
Washington State University - 3/6/2020


Low fruit and vegetable intakes and higher body fat linked to anxiety disorders: Gender, poverty, chronic pain, relationship status and number of chronic health conditions also linked
New research from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging shows that adults who have low fruit and vegetable intakes have a higher likelihood of being diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. "For those who consumed less than 3 sources of fruits and vegetables daily, there was at least at 24% higher odds of anxiety disorder diagnosis," says study lead Karen Davison, health science faculty member, nutrition informatics lab director at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, (KPU) and North ...
University of Toronto - 2/27/2020


Distrust of past experience may underlie obsessive-compulsive symptoms: New findings could help patients and treatment providers understand seemingly irrational behaviors
People with higher obsessive-compulsive symptoms may place less trust in their past experience, leading to increased uncertainty, indecisiveness, and exploratory behaviors, according to new research presented in PLOS Computational Biology by Isaac Fradkin of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, and colleagues. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by intrusive thoughts, urges, or images that cause marked distress, and repetitive behavioral or mental rituals.
PLOS - 2/27/2020


Connectedness to nature makes children happier: This connection causes children to display more sustainable behaviors, which in turn gives them greater levels of happiness
A new study in Frontiers in Psychology, led by Dr Laura Berrera-Hernández and her team at the Sonora Institute of Technology (ITSON), has shown for the first time that connectedness to nature makes children happier due to their tendency to perform sustainable and pro-ecological behaviors. As our planet faces growing threats from a warming climate, deforestation and mass species extinction, research focusing on the relationships between humans and nature is increasingly ...
Frontiers - 2/26/2020


How your romantic attachment style affects your finances, well-being: Attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance can both have negative consequences for well-being due, at least in part, to financial reasons, researchers found
Everyone approaches romantic relationships differently. On one end of the spectrum are people who crave closeness so much, they may come across as "clingy." On the other end are those who value their independence so deeply that they avoid getting too close to anyone else. Those two extremes of romantic attachment orientation – known as attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance – can both have negative consequences for well-being due, at least in part, to financial reasons, a study ...
University of Arizona - 2/25/2020


Mental health challenges four times higher in young mothers: Findings can be used to develop better screening processes
New research from McMaster Children's Hospital shows that two out of three young mothers have at least one mental health problem. Researchers found that teen mothers have a much higher prevalence of mental health challenges than mothers aged 21 and older and teens who aren't parents. Almost 40% of young moms have more than one mental health issue, including depression, a range of anxiety disorders and hyperactivity. This is up to four times higher than in mothers aged 21 ...
McMaster University - 2/21/2020


When parents should worry about teen girls' selfies: Adolescent girls who invest a lot of time in editing and selecting the perfect selfie may feel more body shame and appearance anxiety, researchers found
A study of teenage girls' selfie-taking behaviors found that taking and sharing selfies on social media is not linked to poor body image or appearance concerns. However, when adolescent girls spend too much time agonizing over which photo of themselves to post, or rely heavily on editing apps to alter their images, there may be cause for concern. The study, by researchers at the University of Arizona, found that selfie editing and time invested in creating and selecting the perfect selfie ...
University of Arizona - 2/19/2020


Masking the Memory of Fear: Treating Anxiety Disorders such as PTSD with an Opioid
While fear memory―or the ability to remember contexts in which to be afraid―is important for survival, too much of it, and an inability to forget contexts that no longer apply, hinders daily activities. Recently, scientists from Japan found that a certain opioid drug can help mask some fear memory without causing undesirable side effects. This could make new therapies possible for anxiety disorders like phobias or PTSD. Anxiety disorders such as phobias and PTSD are fairly common ...
Tokyo University of Science - 2/18/2020


Reconnecting with nature key for the health of people and the planet
Individuals who visit natural spaces weekly, and feel psychologically connected to them, report better physical and mental wellbeing, new research has shown. Alongside the benefits to public health, those who make weekly nature visits, or feel connected to nature, are also more likely to behave in ways which promote environmental health, such as recycling and conservation activities. The findings of the study, published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology, indicate that reconnecting ...
University of Plymouth - 2/13/2020


Gut feelings: Gut bacteria are linked to our personality
Dr Katerina Johnson, who conducted her PhD in the University's Department of Experimental Psychology, was researching the science of that 'gut feeling' - the relationship between the bacteria living in the gut (the gut microbiome) and behavioural traits. In a large human study she found that both gut microbiome composition and diversity were related to differences in personality, including sociability and neuroticism.
University of Oxford - 2/12/2020


Nutrition a key ingredient for psychological health in Canadian adults
A new study investigating factors that contribute to psychological distress in adults has found that that risk of malnourishment is linked to psychological distress among Canadians aged 45 years and older. "These findings are consistent with other research which has found links between poor quality diet, and depression, bipolar disorder, and psychological distress," says study lead Dr. Karen Davison, Health Science faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in ...
University of Toronto - 2/12/2020


Sitting still linked to increased risk of depression in adolescents
Too much time sitting still - sedentary behaviour - is linked to an increased risk of depressive symptoms in adolescents, finds a new UCL-led study. The Lancet Psychiatry study found that an additional 60 minutes of light activity (such as walking or doing chores) daily at age 12 was associated with a 10% reduction in depressive symptoms at age 18. "Our findings show that young people who are inactive for large proportions of the day throughout adolescence face a greater risk of ...
University College London - 2/11/2020


A happy partner leads to a healthier future: Science confirms: 'happy wife, happy life.'
Science now supports the saying, “happy wife, happy life.” Michigan State University research found that those who are optimistic contribute to the health of their partners, staving off the risk factors leading to Alzheimer’s disease, dementia and cognitive decline as they grow old together. “We spend a lot of time with our partners,” said William Chopik, assistant professor of psychology and co-author of the study. “They might encourage us to exercise, eat healthier or remind us to take our ...
Michigan State University - 2/10/2020


Review of evidence finds excessive smartphone, social media use may be linked to youth mental health
A new article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) reviews evidence that suggests an association between excessive smartphone and social media use and mental distress and suicidality among adolescents. The authors say this should be among the factors considered by clinicians and researchers who work in the field of youth mental health. The analysis, led by The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), focuses on smartphone use and does not consider online gaming. It contains ...
Canadian Medical Association Journal - 2/10/2020


Family dynamics may influence suicidal thoughts in children: A look at 9- and 10-year olds reveals they do think about suicide, even if their caregivers don't know
Death by suicide in children has reached a 30-year high in the United States. During middle and high school, 10 to 15% of kids have thoughts of suicide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How early in a child's life do these thoughts begin? New research from Washington University in St. Louis is narrowing the gap in psychology's understanding of suicidal thoughts in young people, the findings show that such thoughts begin as early as 9 and 10 years old.
Washington University in St. Louis - 2/7/2020


Suicidal thoughts among US Army soldiers deployed to Afghanistan
Among nearly 4,000 U.S. Army soldiers deployed in Afghanistan, 11.7% reported suicidal thoughts at some point in their lives, 3.0% within the past year and 1.9% within the past 30 days on questionnaires completed at the midpoint of their deployment in 2012. This observational study used the questionnaires to analyze how common suicidal ideation and mental health disorders were during combat deployment and to examine the associated risk factors. The study is unique in its ...
JAMA Network Open - 1/29/2020


Unhealthy and unhappy -- the mental toll of troubled relationships: Some forms of domestic violence double victims' risk of depression and anxiety disorders later in life, according to research
Some forms of domestic violence double victims' risk of depression and anxiety disorders later in life, according to University of Queensland research. The UQ School of Public Health study found many victims of intimate partner violence at 21 showed signs of mental illness at the age of 30, with women more likely to develop depression and men varying anxiety disorders. Intimate partner violence classifies physical abuse as pushing, shoving and smacking.
University of Queensland - 1/28/2020


When caregivers need care: Caregivers less likely to access needed services, have health insurance, study finds
People who regularly care for or assist a family member or friend with a health problem or disability are more likely to neglect their own health, particularly by not having insurance or putting off necessary health services due to cost, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association. “Caregivers provide tremendous benefits for their loved ones, yet they may be at risk for lacking access to needed services which puts their health in jeopardy,” ...
American Psychological Association - 1/23/2020


Cyberbullying linked to increased depression and PTSD
Cyberbullying had the impact of amplifying symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in young people who were inpatients at an adolescent psychiatric hospital, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. The study addressed both the prevalence and factors related to cyberbullying in adolescent inpatients. "Even against a backdrop of emotional challenges in the kids we studied, we noted cyberbullying had an adverse impact. It's real and ...
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine - 1/21/2020


Faking emotions at work does more harm than good: Making an effort to actually feel positive emotions, rather than faking them, can produce personal and professional benefits, according to research
The adage "Fake it until you make it" - the idea that someone can fake a positive attitude to elicit real-life benefits - often backfires when used with co-workers, according to a study led by a University of Arizona researcher. Instead, researchers say, making an effort to actually feel the emotions you display is more productive. Allison Gabriel, associate professor of management and organizations in the Eller College of Management, led a team that analyzed two types of emotion regulation ...
University of Arizona - 1/17/2020


Study sheds light on link between cannabis, anxiety and stress
A molecule produced by the brain that activates the same receptors as marijuana is protective against stress by reducing anxiety-causing connections between two brain regions, Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers report. This finding, published today in Neuron, could help explain why some people use marijuana when they're anxious or under stress. It could also mean that pharmacologic treatments that increase levels of this molecule, known as "2-AG," in the brain could ...
Vanderbilt University Medical Center - 1/13/2020


Study finds potential new treatment for preventing post traumatic stress disorder: Discovery of biomarker unique to people with PTSD a world first
Research led by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation points to a groundbreaking discovery about a new potential treatment and prevention for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The research team, led by Dr. Fang Liu, Senior Scientist and Head of Molecular Neuroscience in CAMH's Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, and Professor and Co-director of Division of Neuroscience and Clinical Translation, ...
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health - 1/13/2020


Lonely in a crowd: Overcoming loneliness with acceptance and wisdom -- Study looked at characteristics of loneliness in a senior housing community and the strategies residents used to overcome it
By nature, human beings are social creatures. Yet, as we age, personal dynamics and lifestyles change, which can result in loneliness and isolation. With older adults increasingly moving into senior living or retirement communities, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine sought to identify the common characteristics of residents who feel lonely in these environments.
University of California - San Diego - 1/10/2020



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