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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Study suggests bipolar disorder has genetic links to autism: Findings from a 2-pronged approach add to evidence of shared genetic susceptibility across major psychiatric disorders
A new study suggests there may be an overlap between rare genetic variations linked to bipolar disorder (BD) and those implicated in schizophrenia and autism. The study, by researchers at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and published recently in JAMA Psychiatry, adds to the growing understanding that many psychiatric diseases share genetic roots, but is among the first to suggest a genetic overlap between ...
EurekAlert - 5/4/2016


Ocean views linked to better mental health
Here’s another reason to start saving for that beach house: New research suggests that residents with a view of the water are less stressed. The study, co-authored by Michigan State University’s Amber L. Pearson, is the first to find a link between health and the visibility of water, which the researchers call blue space. “Increased views of blue space is significantly associated with lower levels of psychological distress,” said Pearson, assistant professor of health geography and ...
Michigan State University - 4/28/2016


Mental health risks aren't equal among all gay, bisexual men
While gay and bisexual men are at higher risk for mental health issues than their straight counterparts, the risk is particularly high for young gay and bisexual men, a new study has found. On the other hand, high levels of education, income and living with a man were among the factors that seemed to protect gay and bisexual men of all ages against depression, anxiety and other mental health problems.
Reuters - 4/28/2016


Exercise genes? Study suggests certain people with depression may benefit from exercise
Call it personalized medicine for depression -- but the prescription in this case is exercise, which University of Florida Health researchers have found helps people with certain genetic traits. A UF study has found that specific genetic markers that put people at risk for depression also predict who might benefit from exercise, according to a study published recently in The Journal of Frailty & Aging.
ScienceDaily - 4/27/2016


Spanking: More Harm Than Good? It can lead to psychological, learning problems in kids, analysis of 75 studies suggests
Spare the rod and spoil the child. Not so fast, suggests a new review that found spanking doesn't produce better behavior and may set up a child for psychological and learning problems later. "Spanking is not achieving parents' goals," said lead researcher Elizabeth Gershoff, a developmental psychologist at the University of Texas at Austin. "Children have more mental health problems the more they are spanked. They have lower cognitive ability, scoring lower on achievement tests."
HealthDay - 4/27/2016


Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy linked to reduced depressive relapse risk
Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy was associated with a reduced risk of depressive relapse over a 60-week follow-up period compared with usual care and outcomes were comparable to those who received other active treatments, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. Recurrent depression causes significant disability. Interventions that prevent depressive relapse could help reduce the burden of this disease. A growing body of research suggests mindfulness-based ...
EurekAlert - 4/27/2016


Does Frequent Sex Lead to Better Relationships? Depends on How You Ask
Newlywed couples who have a lot of sex don’t report being any more satisfied with their relationships than those who have sex less often, but their automatic behavioral responses tell a different story, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. “We found that the frequency with which couples have sex has no influence on whether or not they report being happy with their relationship, but their sexual frequency does ...
Association for Psychological Science - 4/26/2016


Videogame addiction linked to ADHD: Young and single men are at risk of being addicted to video games. The addiction indicates an escape from ADHD and psychiatric disorder
“Video game addiction is more prevalent among younger men, and among those not being in a current relationship, than others,” says, Cecilie Schou Andreassen, doctor of psychology and clinical psychologist specialist at Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen (UiB). Schou Andreassen has carried out a study with more than 20,000 participants who answered questions related to videogame addiction. The study showed that video game addiction appears to be associated with ...
University of Bergen - 4/25/2016


Many U.S. Adults Think Kids' Health Is Worse Today: They also think children have higher stress levels, less family time, poorer coping skills and personal friendships, survey finds
More than half of American adults believe children have worse emotional and mental health than children in previous generations, a new survey shows. Many of the nearly 2,700 respondents also believe youngsters today have higher stress levels, less quality family time, and poorer coping skills and personal friendships, according to the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. Mott is part of the University of Michigan. The survey, published April 18, also found ...
HealthDay - 4/18/2016


Early Treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Accelerates Recovery—But Eventually Reaches a Treatment Plateau
The majority of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) recover after early treatment, but a substantial number still suffer for years after a traumatic event, even with early clinical interventions, according to a study from NYU Langone Medical Center and published online April 12 in The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.
NYU Langone Medical Center - 4/14/2016


Study links gang membership and depression
Kids who decide to join gangs are more likely to be depressed and suicidal – and these mental health problems only worsen after joining, finds a new study co-authored by a Michigan State University criminologist. Gang membership is associated with greater levels of depression, as well as a 67 percent increase in suicidal thoughts and a 104 percent increase in suicide attempts.
Michigan State University - 4/13/2016


Body Dysmorphic Disorder symptoms improve, relapse preventable with sustained medication: Groundbreaking study of this chronic disease affecting millions
People with Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) fare better and are less likely to relapse when treated with medication on a long-term basis, according to researchers at Rhode Island Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital. BDD is an often-chronic mental illness in which people focus intensively on perceived physical flaws, which to others appear minor or even nonexistent. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) that is tailored to BDD and certain types of antidepressant medication called ...
ScienceDaily - 4/8/2016


Simultaneous cocaine, alcohol use linked to suicide risk
A new study of hundreds of emergency department visits finds that the links between substance misuse and suicide risk are complex, but that use of cocaine and alcohol together was particularly significant. In a general sense, medical studies support the popular intuition — a staple of movies and literature — that suicidal behavior and substance misuse are linked. But the relationship between the two is not so simple. A new study of hundreds of suicidal emergency department (ED) patients ...
Brown University - 4/8/2016


Threat of climate change found to be key psychological and emotional stressor
Climate change is a significant threat to the health of Americans, creating unprecedented health problems in areas where they might not have previously occurred, according to a report released April 4 by the White House. The report, "The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States: A Scientific Assessment," was developed by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, and outlines the impacts climate change has on human health, including mental health and well-being.
ScienceDaily - 4/5/2016


Parents’ binge eating, restrictive feeding practices may be reactions to children’s emotions
A new study of more than 440 parents and their preschoolers offers insight into why some parents who binge eat also may try to restrict their children’s food intake, placing their children at higher risk for unhealthy eating habits and weight problems. Parents who reported feeling distress when their child was angry, crying or fearful were more likely to engage in episodes of binge eating – and to limit the amounts or types of food they provided to their children, ...
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign - 3/30/2016


Study looks at why people may feel more helpless in stressful situations than others: Scientists have identified a list of brain areas that might have a critical role to play in stress-induced depression
Stress - we're all too familiar with it. More of us than ever are feeling the relentless pressure of busy lives and it is taking its toll. In the US, stress related ailments cost the nation $300 billion every year in medical bills and lost productivity. But it seems some people are able to cope with this problem much better than others. Some individuals are resilient, while others succumb to despair. The reason, scientists have discovered, is all in the brain.
EurekAlert - 3/30/2016


Genes May Link Risks for Pot Use, Depression: Researchers say they found gene variants that boost the risk for marijuana dependence
A genetic risk for marijuana dependence may be associated with a higher inherited risk for major depression, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed the gene profiles of more than 14,000 people and identified several genetic variants that significantly boost the risk of marijuana dependence. According to the researchers, it's the first study to pinpoint those variants.
HealthDay - 3/30/2016


How to Tell If Your Teen Has a Mental Health Problem: 1 in 5 kids develop a serious problem but many go years without treatment, psychiatrist says
Mood swings and other challenging behaviors are normal in teens, which can make it difficult for parents to spot serious mental health problems such as depression and anxiety, an expert says. One in five teens will develop a serious mental health disorder, with most beginning by age 15. In many cases, however, they don't receive treatment until years later, according to Dr. Aaron Krasner, an adolescent psychiatrist and Transitional Living Service chief at Silver Hill Hospital in ...
HealthDay - 3/29/2016


Psychotherapy for depressed rats shows genes aren't destiny: Engaging environment makes genetically depressed rats ‘happier’
Genes are not destiny in determining whether an individual will suffer from depression, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. Environment is a major factor, and nurture can override nature. When rats genetically bred for depression received the equivalent of rat “psychotherapy,” their depressed behavior was alleviated. And, after the depressed rats had the therapy, some of their blood biomarkers for depression changed to non-depressed levels.
Northwestern University - 3/29/2016


Emotional distress in teens linked to later employment prospects
Suffering from emotional problems in adolescence is an important risk factor for future joblessness, irrespective of socio-economic background, according to a new report by academics at the University of Stirling. The research, which examined the employment patterns of over 7,000 Americans over a 12 year period, found clear evidence that distressed adolescents – who tend to feel nervous or depressed rather than calm or happy – subsequently experienced higher levels of joblessness in ...
University of Stirling - 3/29/2016


Improving Therapy for a Very Common Disorder, Generalized Anxiety: UMass Amherst, Canadian research offers promising new approach
Results of a five-year, randomized clinical trial of a new combined treatment approach for severe generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) led by Henny Westra at York University, Toronto, with Michael Constantino at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Martin Antony at Ryerson University, Toronto, suggest that integrating motivational interviewing (MI) with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) improves long-term patient improvement rates than CBT alone.
University of Massachusetts Amherst - 3/21/2016


Young Transgender Women May Face Mental Health Woes: But study looked at a specific, high-risk group, so findings may not apply to all, researchers say
More than 40 percent of young, low-income transgender women with a history of unsafe sexual behavior struggle with at least one serious mental health issue and/or substance abuse problem, a small study suggests. Nearly 20 percent have two or more serious mental health diagnoses, the investigators said. The findings concern both teens and young adults who identify as women but were born male. The study also found that mental health and substance abuse issues are roughly two to four ...
HealthDay - 3/21/2016


Even with higher education, obese women run greater risk of depression
ven with higher education, women with a body mass index (BMI) of 30-34.9 (obese I) have double the risk of depression compared with women of normal weight and same educational attainment, according to a new study conducted by a sociologist at Rice University. The study was published this month by the journal Obesity Research and Clinical Practice.
EurekAlert - 3/21/2016


Heart Defects at Birth May Raise Risk for PTSD Later in Life: Rate is three times higher than in the general population, study finds
Adults born with heart defects may be at increased risk for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), researchers say. The reason? High levels of mental stress associated with their condition and treatments, the study authors suggested. The study included 134 adults who had been born with heart defects, known as congenital heart disease (CHD). The investigators found that 11 percent to 21 percent of these adults had PTSD, depending on the method used to assess symptoms of the disorder.
HealthDay - 3/18/2016


Many Men Have Body Image Issues, Too: Study finds appearance, weight, muscle tone often affect how guys feel about themselves
Women aren't the only ones at risk of worrying about their looks: A new study finds many men also fret about their physique, especially gay men. Surveys on male body image found that 20 percent to 40 percent of men were unhappy with some aspect of their looks, including physical appearance, weight, and muscle size and tone. Those feelings spilled into their health and sex lives, as well.
HealthDay - 3/18/2016


Women Who've Battled Postpartum Depression Often Limit Family Size: They're unlikely to have more than two kids, researchers say
Women who've had postpartum depression may not have more than two children, a new study suggests. Researchers examined data from more than 300 mothers born in the early to mid-20th century. Most of them lived in developed nations while raising their children, researchers said.
HealthDay - 3/18/2016


Chemical Discovered at UC Davis May Be New Tool for Depression Therapy
A chemical discovered in the Bruce Hammock laboratory at the University of California, Davis, may be a new, innovative tool to control depression, a severe and chronic psychiatric disease that affects 350 million people worldwide. The research, published March 14 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, involves studies of an inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase in rodents. Soluble epoxide hydrolase, or sEH, is emerging as a therapeutic target that acts on ...
University of California, Davis - 3/14/2016


If you treat a parent's depression, will their child's asthma improve?
A new study is underway to determine whether treating a depressed caregiver will improve the child’s asthma. The researchers say the findings eventually may reduce health disparities in child asthma because there is a higher percentage of depressed caregivers among children with asthma from minority and socio-economically disadvantaged groups.
ScienceDaily - 3/11/2016


'Thinking and Feeling’: UCSB researchers studying empathy in relationships find that in the absence of caring, understanding alone doesn’t cut it
So you had a terrible day at work. Or the bills are piling up and cash is in short supply. Impending visit from the in-laws, perhaps? When stress sets in, many of us turn to a partner to help us manage by being a sounding board or shoulder to cry on. Your odds of actually feeling better are much improved if they’re both those things. New research by psychologists at UC Santa Barbara reveals that simply understanding your partner’s suffering isn’t sufficient to be helpful in a stressful ...
University of California - Santa Barbara - 3/7/2016


New mothers with postpartum psychiatric disorders face increased risk of suicide: Study
Over a period spanning four decades, a total of eight Danish women committed suicide within a year of being diagnosed with a birth-related psychiatric disorder, including severe episodes of postpartum depression or psychosis. Despite the modest number, statistical evidence of a causal link between postpartum disorder and suicide is extremely strong, highlighting the need for medical staff to be aware of the risk, according to the researchers who carried out the study.
EurekAlert - 3/7/2016


Can social support be a bad thing for older adults?
Social support from family and friends does not have an entirely positive effect on mental health but is instead a 'mixed blessing,' say researchers. This is the first study that demonstrates the simultaneous negative and positive effects of social support among Singaporean older adults and has implications for policy makers.
ScienceDaily - 3/4/2016


People with anxiety show fundamental differences in perception
People with anxiety fundamentally perceive the world differently, according to a study reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on March 3. They aren't simply making the choice to "play it safe." The new study shows that people diagnosed with anxiety are less able to distinguish between a neutral, "safe" stimulus (in this case, the sound of a tone) and one that was earlier associated with the threat of money loss or gain. In other words, when it comes to emotional experiences, ...
EurekAlert - 3/3/2016


When it comes to predicting depression, race may matter more than was thought, study suggests
Depression can strike anyone, taking a toll on mental and physical health, friendships, work and studies. But figuring out who’s at risk for it is still a murky task. A new University of Michigan study suggests that standard ways of looking for depression risk may not work as well among blacks as they do among whites. But listening to how blacks describe their own mental health could help, the study suggests.
University of Michigan Health System - 3/3/2016


Brain tune-up may aid self-motivation
At our best, we motivate ourselves every day to get dressed and go to work or school. Although there are larger incentives at work, it's our own volition that powers us through our innumerable daily tasks. If we could learn to control the motivational centers of our brains that drive volition, would it lead us toward healthier, more productive lives? Using a new brain imaging strategy, Duke University scientists have now taken a first step in understanding how to manipulate specific neural ...
EurekAlert - 3/3/2016


Study links mobile device addiction to depression and anxiety
Is cellphone use detrimental to mental health? A new study from the University of Illinois finds that addiction to, and not simply use of, mobile technology is linked to anxiety and depression in college-age students. The study was published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior. “There’s a long history of the public fearing new technologies as they are deployed in society,” said U. of I. psychology professor Alejandro Lleras, who conducted this study with undergraduate honors student ...
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign - 3/2/2016


Link between ADHD, vision impairment in children
A new study sheds light on a link between noncorrectable vision problems and ADHD in children. Results from a large survey of 75,000 children suggest an increased risk of ADHD among children with vision problems that are not correctable with glasses or contacts, such as color blindness or lazy eye, relative to other children. This finding suggests that children with vision impairment should be monitored for signs and symptoms of ADHD so that this dual impairment of vision and attention ...
ScienceDaily - 2/25/2016


Attention bias modification treatment in depressed adolescents
A study to be published in the March 2016 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry(JAACAP) reports that adolescents with major depression who performed a computer-based task designed to shift attention from sad to neutral to positive word associations showed reductions in negative attention biases and clinician-rated depressive symptoms.
Elsevier - 2/24/2016


Why is impulsive aggression in children so difficult to treat?
Maladaptive and impulsive aggression is explosive, triggered by routine environmental cues, and intended to harm another person, making it a significant challenge for clinicians, family members, and others who interact with affected children and adolescents. Efforts to develop effective treatments would benefit from better descriptive and quantitative methods to characterize this disorder, as described in an article published in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, ...
EurekAlert - 2/23/2016


Parental anxiety/depression linked to pre-schoolers' fussy eating
Parental anxiety and/or depression during pregnancy and before their child starts school is linked to a heightened risk of that child becoming a 'fussy' eater, finds research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. The associations were evident for mums at both time periods, but just during the pre-school period for dads, the findings indicate.
EurekAlert - 2/22/2016


Young people with mental problems should receive help in their own environment
Young people with mental problems – especially those with psychotic-like symptoms – should receive help as early as possible and in their own environment. This was the conclusion of a joint study of the University of Helsinki, the Helsinki University Hospital Department of Psychiatry and the National Institute for Health and Welfare.
University of Helsinki - 2/18/2016



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