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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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How #MeToo, awareness months and Facebook are helping us heal
If we have learned anything on social media in 2017 it’s that everything isn’t okay. Far from it. But we are finally starting to talk about it — according to researchers at Drexel University who study our relationships with social network sites. Their latest work, an examination of how and why women decide to disclose pregnancy loss on Facebook, sheds light on a shift in our social media behavior that is making it easier for people to come forward and share their painful, personal and ...
Drexel University - 2/16/2018


Romantic relationships buffer gay and lesbian youth from emotional distress
Lesbian and gay youth showed significantly less psychological distress and were buffered against the negative effects of bullying and victimization when they were in a relationship than when they were not, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study conducted in collaboration with the University of Cincinnati. The finding is particularly important because prior research has not found a protective effect like this for support from parents and friends.
Northwestern University - 2/15/2018


Running helps the brain counteract negative effect of stress, study finds: Exercise protects vital memory and learning functions
Most people agree that getting a little exercise helps when dealing with stress. A new BYU study discovers exercise under stress also helps protect your memory. The study, newly published in the journal of Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, finds that running mitigates the negative impacts chronic stress has on the hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory.
Brigham Young University - 2/14/2018


Sibling bullying makes psychotic disorders three times more likely
People who were bullied by siblings during childhood are up to three times more likely to develop psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia in early adulthood, according to new research by the University of Warwick. Led by Professor Dieter Wolke (senior author) at Warwick's Department of Psychology, this is the first study to explore the relationship between sibling bullying and the development of psychotic disorders.
University of Warwick - 2/12/2018


Acne linked with increased risk of depression
In an analysis of one of the largest electronic medical records databases in the world, researchers found that patients with acne had a significantly increased risk of developing major depression, but only in the first 5 years after being diagnosed with acne. The British Journal of Dermatology analysis included data from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) (1986-2012), a large primary care database in the United Kingdom.
Wiley - 2/7/2018


Opioid Cessation May Be More Successful When Depression Is Treated
Opioid cessation in non-cancer pain may be more successful when depression is treated to remission, a Saint Louis University study shows. The study, "Impact of adherence to antidepressants and on long-term prescription opioid use" was published in the February issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry. Jeffrey Scherrer, Ph.D., professor of family and community medicine at Saint Louis University and his co-authors have found depression is a consequence of chronic opioid use.
Saint Louis University - 2/5/2018


Researchers find grape-derived compounds may promote resilience against depression
In a study to be published online February 2 in Nature Communications, scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai describe an extensive analysis of novel grape-derived compounds, dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA) and malvidin-3'-O-glucoside (Mal-gluc),which might be developed as therapeutic agents for the treatment of depression. The study results indicate that these natural compounds may attenuate depression by targeting newly discovered underlying mechanisms of the disease.
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine - 2/2/2018


Psychiatric medications are not overprescribed for kids, finds study
A new study at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) challenges the popular notion that psychiatric medications are overprescribed in children and adolescents in the U.S. When the researchers compared prescribing rates with prevalence rates for the most common psychiatric disorders in children, they discovered that some of these medications may be underprescribed.
Columbia University Medical Center - 1/29/2018


Only 1 in 10 patients with anxiety disorders receives the right treatment: The results obtained from a sample of 51,547 respondents suggest a need to improve both the recognition and treatment of anxiety disorders
The director of the Epidemiology and Public Health programme at the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM) and CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) researcher, Jordi Alonso, was commissioned by the World Mental Health to lead an international study into the adequacy of anxiety disorder treatment across the globe. The results, from a sample of more than 51,500 individuals from 21 different countries, reveals that 10% of people suffer anxiety. Of these, only ...
IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute) - 1/23/2018


Short-course treatment for combat-related PTSD offers expedited path to recovery
Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can be debilitating and standard treatment can take months, often leaving those affected unable to work or care for their families. But, a new study demonstrated that many PTSD sufferers can benefit from an expedited course of treatment. In the first study of its kind, Prolonged Exposure (PE) therapy was found to be as effective when administered over two weeks as when it is provided over eight weeks for treating PTSD in active-duty ...
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine - 1/23/2018


Increasing Number of Adolescents Receive a Psychiatric or Neurodevelopmental Diagnosis
According to a national register study comparing Finnish birth cohorts from 1987 and 1997, an increasing number of adolescents receive a psychiatric or neurodevelopmental diagnosis. The number of diagnosed adolescents increased especially for girls in the younger cohort. The results of the study conducted by the University of Turku and the National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL) were published in the Lancet Psychiatry journal.
University of Turku - 1/19/2018


Natural environments promote positive body image: New research shows powerful effect of green spaces
New research shows that the natural environment has a powerful effect on promoting positive body image - and you don't even have to set foot outdoors to experience the benefits. The research, published in the journal Body Image, involved five separate studies carried out by academics from Anglia Ruskin University, Perdana University in Malaysia, and University College London.
Anglia Ruskin University - 1/18/2018


Tracking the impact of early abuse and neglect: Study led by university researcher shows negative effects may persist into adulthood
Children who experience abuse and neglect early in life are more likely to have problems in social relationships and underachieve academically as adults. Maltreatment experienced before age 5 can have negative effects that continue to be seen nearly three decades later, according to a new study led by Lee Raby, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Utah. “It is not a controversial statement to say abuse and neglect can have harmful consequences,” Raby said.
University of Utah - 1/16/2018


No evidence to support link between violent video games and behavior
Researchers at the University of York have found no evidence to support the theory that video games make players more violent. In a series of experiments, with more than 3,000 participants, the team demonstrated that video game concepts do not 'prime' players to behave in certain ways and that increasing the realism of violent video games does not necessarily increase aggression in game players.
University of York - 1/16/2018


Flawed research methods exaggerate the prevalence of depression
The common practice of using patient self-report screening questionnaires rather than diagnostic interviews conducted by researchers has resulted in overestimates of the prevalence of depression, according to an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.170691. "These studies misrepresent the actual rate of depression, sometimes dramatically, which makes it very difficult to direct the right resources to problems faced by patients," ...
Canadian Medical Association Journal - 1/15/2018


Teens who were severely bullied as children at higher risk of suicidal thoughts, mental health issue
Teens who were severely bullied as children by peers are at higher risk of mental health issues, including suicidal thoughts and behaviours, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). "Our findings showed a general tendency, in about 15% of the children, of being exposed to the most severe levels of victimization from the beginning of their education until the transition to high school," writes Dr. Marie-Claude Geoffroy, McGill Group for Suicide Studies, ...
Canadian Medical Association Journal - 1/15/2018


Here's how stress may be making you sick
A Michigan State University researcher is providing new insight into how certain types of stress interact with immune cells and can regulate how these cells respond to allergens, ultimately causing physical symptoms and disease. The federally funded study, published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, showed how a stress receptor, known as corticotropin-releasing factor, or CRF1, can send signals to certain immune cells, called mast cells, and control how they defend the body.
Michigan State University - 1/10/2018


Resolving to have a happier, healthier 2018? Reshape your body attitudes
Put together a list of New Year’s resolutions yet? Every year, many of us pledge to work harder at being healthy, losing weight or eating more veggies. A Nielsen survey showed about one-third of Americans resolved to shed a few pounds and reshape their bodies. Here’s a better resolution: Lose the critical thoughts about your body. That’s the advice of Florida State University Professor Pamela Keel. Her research team has tested a new program encouraging body acceptance and ...
Florida State University - 1/3/2018


Perfectionism among young people significantly increased since 1980s, study finds: Excessive desire to succeed, compete with others may have negative impact on youth psychological health
The drive to be perfect in body, mind and career among today's college students has significantly increased compared with prior generations, which may be taking a toll on young people's mental health, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. This study is the first to examine group generational differences in perfectionism, according to lead author Thomas Curran, PhD, of the University of Bath.
American Psychological Association - 1/2/2018


Getting the right treatment: Predicting treatment response in depression -- Antidepressants are not a one-size-fits-all pill
New evidence from mice suggests why an antidepressant treatment can alleviate depression in one person but not another. The study, publishing December 28 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, was led by Marianne Müller and an international team at the University Medical Center Mainz and the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry. The researchers developed a mouse model that allowed them to identify blood signatures associated with response to antidepressant treatment and ...
PLOS - 12/28/2017


Neuroscientists shed light on causes of postpartum depression using new research model
Postpartum depression strikes nearly one in five new mothers, who may experience anxiety, severe fatigue, inability to bond with their children and suicidal thoughts. Such depression has also been associated with infants' developmental difficulties. Although stress has been identified as a significant risk factor for postpartum depression, this complex disorder is still poorly understood. Now neuroscientists at Tufts University School of Medicine have generated a novel preclinical model of ...
Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus - 12/26/2017


Helpful intestinal bacteria counteracts tendency to depression: Animal studies from Aarhus University indicate that certain lactic acid bacteria can prevent the type of depression which is linked to an unhealthy lifestyle
New research suggests that the micro-organisms known as probiotics, which are normally providing health benefits in the intestines, also have an affect on the brain, or as an actual study at Aarhus University has shown; protect against depression. In the animal study at the Department of Clinical Medicine at Aarhus University, rats were fed with an extra fatty and fiberless compound feed. Some of the rats simultaneously received a mix of micro-organisms, mostly in the form of lactic ...
Aarhus University - 12/22/2017


Singing in groups could make you happier – according to new research
Singing in groups could make you happier - according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). Researchers examined the benefits of singing among people with mental health conditions including anxiety and depression. They found that people who took part in a community singing group maintained or improved their mental health. And that the combination of singing and socialising was an essential part of recovery because it promoted an ongoing feeling ...
University of East Anglia - 12/21/2017


Coloring Books Make You Feel Better, But Real Art Therapy Much More Potent
A new study shows that while those adult coloring books can reduce stress, they’re still not art therapy. Often, the now-ubiquitous adult coloring books will advertise themselves as “art therapy.” But actual art therapists contend that such a claim is misleading, that true art therapy is about growth and relationships and not simply about “feeling better.”
Drexel University - 12/14/2017


Father's rejection may increase child's social anxiety, loneliness
Healthy relationships with their parents are vital for adolescents' development and well-being, according to Penn State researchers who say rejection from fathers may lead to increases in social anxiety and loneliness. The study -- conducted by Hio Wa "Grace" Mak, doctoral student of human development and family studies -- examined how parental rejection, as well as the overall well-being of the family unit, were related to changes in adolescents' social anxiety, friendships and feelings of ...
Penn State - 12/13/2017


The fear of losing control — and its role in anxiety disorders: Study findings may further treatment of OCD, panic attacks, social phobia and more
Did you lock the front door? Did you double-check? Are you sure? If this sounds familiar, perhaps you can relate to people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Help may be on the way. New Concordia research sheds light on how the fear of losing control over thoughts and actions impacts OCD-related behaviour, including checking. “We’ve shown that people who believe they're going to lose control are significantly more likely to exhibit checking behaviour with greater frequency,” says ...
Concordia University - 12/13/2017


Healthy eating linked to kids' happiness
Healthy eating is associated with better self-esteem and fewer emotional and peer problems, such as having fewer friends or being picked on or bullied, in children regardless of body weight, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health. Inversely, better self-esteem is associated with better adherence to healthy eating guidelines, according to researchers from The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
BioMed Central - 12/13/2017


Depression’s causal mechanisms identified with new method
People with major depressive disorder have alterations in the activity and connectivity of brain systems underlying reward and memory, according to a new study by the University of Warwick. The findings provide clues as to which regions of the brain could be at the root of symptoms, such as reduced happiness and pleasure, or negative memories, in depression.
University of Warwick - 12/12/2017


Your mood depends on the food you eat, and what you should eat changes as you get older: Young adults and mature adults require different food to improve their mental health
Diet and dietary practices differentially affect mental health in young adults versus older adults, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. Lina Begdache, assistant professor of health and wellness studies at Binghamton University, along with fellow Binghamton researchers, conducted an anonymous internet survey, asking people around the world to complete the Food-Mood Questionnaire (FMQ), which includes questions on food groups that ...
Binghamton University - 12/11/2017


Understanding Mental Disorder through a Scientific Lens
Diagnosing mental-health issues may seem straightforward: Patients discuss their symptoms and a clinician matches those symptoms to a disorder and devises an appropriate treatment. In reality, this view belies the complexity inherent in understanding, classifying, and diagnosing psychiatric phenomena. Advances in clinical science over the past several decades have led to major improvements in how mental disorder is diagnosed and treated—millions of individuals now have ...
Association for Psychological Science - 12/7/2017


A fear of getting dumped kills romance and commitment: Perceived risk of a romantic relationship ending influences the intensity of love and commitment
Can the fear of a relationship ending actually lessen love and cause a break-up? If yes, how does it happen? These were the questions that Simona Sciara and Giuseppe Pantaleo of the Vita-Salute San Raffaele University in Italy set out to answer in an article published in Springer's journal Motivation and Emotion. Their research complements what is already known about how obstacles to a romantic relationship affect attraction and commitment towards a partner.
ScienceDaily - 11/28/2017


A walk at the mall or the park? New study shows, for moms and daughters, a walk in the park is best
Spending time together with family may help strengthen the family bond, but new research from the University of Illinois shows that specifically spending time outside in nature--even just a 20-minute walk--together can help family members get along even better. The research is based on the attention restoration theory which describes how interaction with natural environments can reduce mental fatigue and restore attentional functioning. Many studies have supported the theory, but ...
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences - 11/17/2017


Brain activity buffers against worsening anxiety: Activity in brain's thinking and problem-solving center linked to avoiding anxiety
Boosting activity in brain areas related to thinking and problem-solving may also buffer against worsening anxiety, suggests a new study by Duke University researchers. Using non-invasive brain imaging, the researchers found that people at-risk for anxiety were less likely to develop the disorder if they had higher activity in a region of the brain responsible for complex mental operations. The results may be a step towards tailoring psychological therapies to the specific brain ...
Duke University - 11/17/2017


Spanking Linked to Increase in Children’s Behavior Problems
Children who have been spanked by their parents by age 5 show an increase in behavior problems at age 6 and age 8 relative to children who have never been spanked, according to new findings in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The study, which uses a statistical technique to approximate random assignment, indicates that this increase in behavior problems cannot be attributed to various characteristics of the child, the parents, or the home ...
Association for Psychological Science - 11/16/2017


Teenage depression linked to father's depression
Adolescents whose fathers have depressive symptoms are more likely to experience symptoms of depression themselves, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. While the link between mothers' depression and depression in their children is well-established, the new Lancet Psychiatry study is the first to find an association between depression in fathers and their teenaged children, independent of whether the mother has depression, in a large sample in the general population.
University College London - 11/15/2017


A new study finds that teens, especially girls, who spend several hours per day on phones and tablets are more likely to be depressed and have suicide-related outcomes
Increased time spent in front of a screen -- in the form of computers, cell phones and tablets -- might have contributed to an uptick in symptoms of depression and suicide-related behaviors and thoughts in American young people, especially girls, according to a new study by San Diego State University professor of psychology Jean Twenge. The findings point to the need for parents to monitor how much time their children are spending in front of media screens.
San Diego State University - 11/14/2017


Cognitive behavioral therapy for children and adolescents with OCD works in the long run
Some children and adolescents think that they will have an accident if they do not count all the lampposts on their way to school. Or cannot leave the house unless they have washed their hands precisely twenty-five times. They suffer from OCD, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, which is an extremely stressful psychiatric disorder that affects between 0.25 and 4 per cent of all children. Fortunately, the treatment method - cognitive behavioural therapy - is both effective and well-documented.
Aarhus University - 11/14/2017


Harmful effects of stress on the brain and promising approaches for relief: Stress reduction can guard against mental illness and alleviate the consequences of poor sleep
Stress can have numerous harmful effects on the mind and body, both immediately and over long periods of time. New research reveals mechanisms by which stress exacts its toll throughout the body, from the brain to the male reproductive system, and points to potential paths for reducing the negative effects of stress. The studies were presented at Neuroscience 2017, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and ...
Society for Neuroscience - 11/13/2017


Scientists identify mechanism that helps us inhibit unwanted thoughts
Scientists have identified a key chemical within the 'memory' region of the brain that allows us to suppress unwanted thoughts, helping explain why people who suffer from disorders such as anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and schizophrenia often experience persistent intrusive thoughts when these circuits go awry. We are sometimes confronted with reminders of unwanted thoughts -- thoughts about unpleasant memories, images or worries. When this ...
University of Cambridge - 11/3/2017


Science confirms you should stop and smell the roses
Is it any wonder that most happiness idioms are associated with nature? Happy as a pig in muck, happy as a clam, happy camper. A UBC researcher says there’s truth to the idea that spending time outdoors is a direct line to happiness. In fact, Holli-Anne Passmore says if people simply take time to notice the nature around them, it will increase their general happiness and well-being. Passmore, a PhD psychology student at UBC’s Okanagan campus, recently published research ...
University of British Columbia Okanagan campus - 11/3/2017



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