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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Is bipolar disorder associated with increased risk of Parkinson's disease?
This study, called a systematic review and meta-analysis, combined the results of seven studies with 4.3 million participants to examine a potential association between bipolar disorder with a later diagnosis of Parkinson disease of unknown cause. The findings suggest that a previous diagnosis of bipolar disorder was associated with increased likelihood of a subsequent Parkinson disease diagnosis but subgroup analyses suggest the possibility of an overestimation of ...
JAMA Neurology - 10/14/2019


Study: Self-reported suicide attempts rising in black teens as other groups decline
Adding to what is known about the growing crisis of suicide among American teens, a team led by researchers at the McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research at New York University have uncovered several troubling trends during the period of 1991-2017, among Black high school students in particular.
New York University - 10/14/2019


Rest may help reduce PTSD symptoms, UCL study finds
A period of rest following a traumatic event can reduce the subsequent development of involuntary 'memory intrusions'*, one of the hallmark symptoms in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new UCL study has found. The study, published in Scientific Reports and funded by the European Research Council and Wellcome, suggests memory disturbances in PTSD may be ameliorated by increased 'consolidation' (a process by which memories are stored and contextualised), which ...
University College London - 10/10/2019


Children bullied by friends and siblings are more likely to think about suicide in their early 20s
Depression, self-harm and suicidal ideation are more prominent in adults in their early twenties if they were bullied at home and at school, a study by researchers at the University of Warwick have found. Researchers stress that intervention is needed to educate people in bullying to reduce it. Professor Dieter WolkePrevious studies have identified that sibling bullying has an effect on mental health in adolescence, however researchers Professor Dieter Wolke and Dr. Slava Dantchev have ...
University of Warwick - 10/9/2019


Can being neighborly reduce depression in older adults?
In a Health & Social Care in the Community study of 10,105 older adults in China examined in 2011, 2013, and 2015, living in neighbourhoods with a higher level of neighbourhood social participation was related to lower rates of depression. Higher level of neighbourhood social participation is related to more time spent on physical activities and a higher frequency of contact with neighbours and with own children. "We highlight the importance of social participation--both at the individual ...
Wiley - 10/9/2019


Large Study Reveals PTSD Has Strong Genetic Component Like Other Psychiatric Disorders: Genetic data from 200,000 people reveals the heritability of post-traumatic stress disorder is similar to that of depression and other forms of mental illness
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders, affecting some 8 million adults at some point in their lifetime in the United States. Despite this, it is not clear why only some people who experience a traumatic event develop PTSD. Some researchers have suggested that the disorder is only a social construct, but previous studies have hinted that genetics plays a role. A new study identifies a clear biological basis for PTSD.
University of California - San Diego - 10/8/2019


Association of family relationships during adolescence with later depression risk
Bottom Line: Positive family relationships during adolescence appeared to be associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms from adolescence to midlife in this observational study of about 18,000 adolescents followed up until they were 32 to 42 years old. The study examined differences between males and females in depressive symptoms by levels of positive family relationships during adolescence as measured by family cohesion (adolescent reports about how much their family ...
JAMA Pediatrics - 10/7/2019


People with anxiety may strategically choose worrying over relaxing
Relaxing is supposed to be good for the body and soul, but people with anxiety may actively resist relaxation and continue worrying to avoid a large jump in anxiety if something bad does happen, according to Penn State research. In a new study, the researchers found that people who were more sensitive to shifts in negative emotion — quickly moving from a relaxed state to one of fear, for example — were more likely to feel anxious while being led through relaxation exercises.
Penn State - 9/30/2019


Which comes first: Smartphone dependency or depression?
Young people who are hooked on their smartphones may be at an increased risk for depression and loneliness, according to a new study from the University of Arizona. A growing body of research has identified a link between smartphone dependency and symptoms of depression and loneliness. However, it's been unclear whether reliance on smartphones precedes those symptoms, or whether the reverse is true: that depressed or lonely people are more likely to become dependent on their phones.
University of Arizona - 9/30/2019


New research finds coastal living linked with better mental health
Researchers from the University of Exeter used survey data from nearly 26,000 respondents in their analysis, which marks one of the most detailed investigations ever into the wellbeing effects of being beside the sea. After taking other related factors into account, the study revealed that living in large towns and cities near to England’s coastline is linked with better mental health for those in the lowest earning households. Approximately one in six adults in England suffer from mental ...
University of Exeter - 9/30/2019


Positive Relationships Boost Self-Esteem, and Vice Versa: Robust reciprocal link found across life span, study says
Does having close friends boost your self-esteem, or does having high self-esteem influence the quality of your friendships? Both, according to a meta-analysis of more than two decades of research, published by the American Psychological Association. "For the first time, we have a systematic answer to a key question in the field of self-esteem research: Whether and to what extent a person's social relationships influence his or her self-esteem development, and vice versa, ...
American Psychological Association - 9/26/2019


Stressed out: Americans making themselves sick over politics
Never-ending campaigns, social media, 24-hour news cycles. Politics are impossible to escape, even for the casual observer. But are policy fights and polarization more than a headache in the collective consciousness? New research from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln suggests yes — that we’re making ourselves sick over politics. Nearly 40% of Americans surveyed for the study said politics is stressing them out, and one in five are losing sleep. These responses and others show ...
University of Nebraska-Lincoln - 9/25/2019


Studies Link Air Pollution to Mental Health Issues in Children
Three new studies by scientists at Cincinnati Children’s, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Cincinnati, highlight the relationship between air pollution and mental health in children. A study published Sept. 25 in Environmental Health Perspectives found that short-term exposure to ambient air pollution was associated with exacerbations of psychiatric disorders in children one to two days later, as marked by increased utilization of the Cincinnati Children’s emergency ...
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center - 9/25/2019


Even mother's mild depressive symptoms affect the child’s emotional well-being – support must be provided through pregnancy and the child’s first year
According to recent research, even mild long-term depressive symptoms among mothers are connected with emotional problems among small children such as hyperactivity, aggressiveness and anxiety. The study investigated how the depressive symptoms of both parents affected the child by the age of two and five. The father’s depressive symptoms affected the child’s emotional problems only if the mother was depressed as well. The mother’s symptoms, however, affected the ...
National Institute for Health and Welfare - 9/23/2019


Children of Refugees with PTSD are at Higher Risk of Developing Psychiatric Disorders
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have studied what it means for children to have parents who are refugees and have PTSD. The study shows that these children have a significantly higher risk of contact with the psychiatric system. The researchers believe that there should be focus on the problem and that early measures and treatment options should be developed.
University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences - 9/13/2019


Research tracks narcissism from young adulthood to middle age
The belief that one is smarter, better looking, more successful and more deserving than others - a personality trait known as narcissism - tends to wane as a person matures, a new study confirms. But not for everyone, and not to the same extent. The study, reported in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, finds that the magnitude of the decline in narcissism between young adulthood and middle age is related to the specific career and personal relationship choices a person makes.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau - 9/11/2019


Increasing Number of Adolescents Receive Depression Diagnosis
The proportion of young people in Finland diagnosed with depression in specialised services is increasing, showed a study based on an extensive set of national data. An increasing number of adolescents seek and get help, but the increase in service use burdens specialised services. The study was conducted by the Research Centre for Child Psychiatry at the University of Turku in Finland. The proportion of individuals who received a diagnosis by the age of 15 in specialised services ...
University of Turku - 9/11/2019


Depression breakthrough: ‘Black Dog’ blamed for major diseases
Major depressive disorder – referred to colloquially as the ‘black dog’ – has been identified as a genetic cause for 20 distinct diseases, providing vital information to help detect and manage high rates of physical illnesses in people diagnosed with depression. Assessing risk factors between depression* and 925 diseases, a study from the Australian Centre for Precision Health at the University of South Australia found a causal relationship between depression and a range of ...
University of South Australia - 9/4/2019


Benefits of cognitive behavioural therapy for IBS continue 2 years after treatment
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder affecting 10 – 20 per cent of people. Abdominal pain, bloating and altered bowel habit significantly affect patient’s quality of life and can force them to take days off work. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder affecting 10 – 20 per cent of people. Abdominal pain, bloating and altered bowel habit significantly affect patient’s quality of life and can force them to take days off work.
University of Southampton - 9/4/2019


Hardship During the Great Recession Linked With Lasting Mental Health Declines
People who suffered a financial, housing-related, or job-related hardship as a result of the Great Recession were more likely to show increases in symptoms of depression, anxiety, and problematic drug use, research shows. The research findings, published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, reveal declines in mental health that were still evident several years after the official end of the recession, but were obscured when examining ...
Association for Psychological Science - 9/3/2019


Cannabis may hold promise to treat PTSD but evidence lags behind use
As growing numbers of people are using cannabis to treat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new UCL study reports that prescriptions are not backed up by adequate evidence. The systematic review, published in the Journal of Dual Diagnosis, finds that the active components of cannabis, called cannabinoids, may hold promise as a treatment for PTSD, particularly for reducing nightmares and helping people sleep, but more research is needed to determine whether these drugs ...
University College London - 9/3/2019


Parenting stress may affect mother's and child's ability to tune in to each other
A study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has revealed the effects of the stress of parenting in the brains of both mothers and their children. The researchers analysed the brain activity of 31 pairs of mother and child from Singapore while they were watching children’s animation clips together. They found that mothers who reported higher levels of parenting stress had less synchrony in brain activity with their child (all aged around 3 years old) than ...
Nanyang Technological University - 8/29/2019


Excess body fat increases the risk of depression: A new study from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, shows that ten kilograms of extra body fat increases the risk of depression by seventeen per cent
Carrying ten kilograms of excess body fat increases the risk of depression by seventeen per cent. The more fat, the greater the probability of developing depression. This is the main conclusion of a new study carried out by researchers from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. "Our study also indicated that the location of the fat on the body makes no difference to the risk of depression. This suggests that it is the psychological consequences of being overweight or ...
Aarhus University - 8/27/2019


Suicide and self-harm risk nearly triple in people with restless leg syndrome
Restless legs syndrome was associated with a nearly tripled risk of suicide and self-harm in a new study led by Penn State researchers. Using Big Data, the researchers found that people with restless legs syndrome (RLS) had a 2.7- fold higher risk of suicide or self-harm, even when the researchers controlled for such conditions as depression, insomnia, diabetes and others. The study was published today (Aug. 23) in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Network Open.
Penn State - 8/23/2019


Transgender college students four times as likely to experience mental health problems
The largest and most comprehensive mental health survey of college students in the US reveals that students who identify as transgender, gender nonconforming, genderqueer, and nonbinary face enormous mental health disparities relative to their peers. In a first-of-its-kind study published on Friday, August 16, in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Boston University researchers and collaborators found that gender minority students, whose gender identity differs from ...
Boston University - 8/16/2019


Trauma begets trauma: bullying associated with increased suicide attempts among 12-to-15-year-olds
A new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that bullying victimization may increase the risk of suicide attempts among young adolescents by approximately three-times worldwide. “Globally, approximately 67,000 adolescents die of suicide each year and identifying modifiable risk factors for adolescent suicide is a public health priority,” said lead author Ai Koyanagi, MD, and Research Professor ...
Elsevier - 8/15/2019


Negative memory storage affects depression symptoms: Inhibiting negative memories could be future depression treatment
Physical manifestations of negative memories in the hippocampus could underlie cognitive symptoms of depression, according to research in mice published in JNeurosci. Inhibiting these manifestations could be a future treatment route. Groups of neurons that are activated after an experience are thought to be the physical representation of memory. These so-called engrams in the hippocampus could be involved in depression, which is characterized by impaired recall of positive memories ...
Society for Neuroscience - 8/12/2019


An alternate theory for what causes Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer’s disease, the most common cause of dementia among the elderly, is characterized by plaques and tangles in the brain, with most efforts at finding a cure focused on these abnormal structures. But a University of California, Riverside, research team has identified alternate chemistry that could account for the various pathologies associated with the disease. Plaques and tangles have so far been the focus of attention in this progressive disease that currently afflicts more than ...
University of California - Riverside - 8/12/2019


Why Stress and Anxiety Aren't Always Bad: Expecting to always feel happy and relaxed a recipe for disappointment, expert says
People generally think of stress and anxiety as negative concepts, but while both stress and anxiety can reach unhealthy levels, psychologists have long known that both are unavoidable — and that they often play a helpful, not harmful, role in our daily lives, according to a presentation at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. “Many Americans now feel stressed about being stressed and anxious about being anxious. Unfortunately, by the time someone reaches out ...
American Psychological Association - 8/10/2019


When Working With Animals Can Hurt Your Mental Health: Veterinarians, others who work with animals, face stressors that may contribute to poor mental health, compassion fatigue, burnout
While it might sound like fun to work around pets every day, veterinarians and people who volunteer at animal shelters face particular stressors that can place them at risk for depression, anxiety and even suicide, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. “People who work or volunteer with animals are often drawn to it because they see it as a personal calling,” said Angela K. Fournier, PhD, of Bemidji State University, who ...
American Psychological Association - 8/9/2019


Physicians Call for an End to Conversion Therapy
Conversion therapy is a broad term used to describe practices and actions aimed at changing people’s sexual orientation or gender identity - to turn anyone who doesn’t identify as “straight” into a “straight” person. Historically, conversion therapies have used electroshock therapy, chemical drugs, hormone administrations and even surgery. While these extreme practices are becoming rarer, many other harmful actions are still taking place, negatively impacting both children and ...
Boston Medical Center - 8/7/2019


Prenatal parental stress linked to behaviour problems in toddlers
Expectant parents' emotional struggles predict emotional and behavioural problems in 2-year-olds, new research shows. The same study reveals, for the first time, that couple conflict helps explain emotional problems in very young children. The team of researchers - from the Universities of Cambridge, Birmingham, New York and Leiden - say their findings highlight a pressing need for greater support for couples before, during and after pregnancy to improve outcomes for children.
University of Cambridge - 8/5/2019


Brains work in sync during music therapy -- study
For the first time researchers have been able to demonstrate that the brains of a patient and therapist become synchronised during a music therapy session, a breakthrough that could improve future interactions between patients and therapists. The research, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, was carried out by Professor Jorg Fachner and Dr Clemens Maidhof of Anglia Ruskin University (ARU). This is the first music therapy study to use a procedure called hyperscanning, ...
Anglia Ruskin University - 7/25/2019


Hair could be the key to better mental-illness diagnosis in teens: Study also finds lower depression risk in kids with good family support
It's possible that a lock of hair could one day aid in the diagnosis of depression and in efforts to monitor the effects of treatment, said the author of a new study examining cortisol levels in the hair of teens. Researchers looked for potential relationships between the concentration of the stress hormone cortisol in the hair and adolescents' depression symptoms and found a surprising connection. Not only did high cortisol levels correspond to a higher likelihood of depression, but ...
Ohio State University - 7/24/2019


New research has potential for 'unpacking' complex simultaneous emotions in adolescence
When faced with emotional challenges or traumatic experiences, we may well have different, mixed feelings both at the same time and sequentially. In adolescence, when complex emotions are experienced as part of everyday life, the effect of challenge or trauma combined with difficulty expressing emotional complexity can exacerbate a given situation and limit the communication needed between young people and professionals. New research published (23rd July 2019) in the Journal ...
University of Chichester - 7/24/2019


Obstructive sleep apnea may be one reason depression treatment doesn't work
When someone is depressed and having suicidal thoughts or their depression treatment just isn't working, their caregivers might want to check to see if they have obstructive sleep apnea, investigators say. That's true even when these individuals don't seem to fit the usual profile of obstructive sleep apnea, which includes males who are overweight, snore and complain of daytime sleepiness, says Dr. W. Vaughn McCall, chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior at ...
Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University - 7/23/2019


Presence of hoarding symptoms does not negatively impact CBT response in youth with OCD
Hoarding can often be a debilitating problem for adults and is often associated with poorer mental health functioning and response to treatment. For children however, that may not be the case. A new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reveals that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) can be successful for youth with hoarding symptoms.
Elsevier - 7/23/2019


Scholars weigh in on new ideas about autism: Authors of provocative paper about social engagement reply to commentaries
A new paper that challenges widely held ideas about autism has attracted comments from more than 30 scholars across the disciplines of psychology, anthropology, education, and neuroscience. The authors maintain that many of the behaviors common to autism--including low eye contact, repetitive movements, and the verbatim repetition of words and phrases--are misinterpreted as a lack of interest in social engagement. On the contrary, they say, many people with autism express ...
University of California - Santa Cruz - 7/23/2019


School readiness impaired in preschoolers with ADHD symptoms, Stanford study finds
Preschoolers with symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are much less likely than other children their age to be ready for school, new research from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found. The study, which will be published online July 21 in Pediatrics, is among the first to comprehensively examine school readiness in young children with ADHD. Several previous studies have addressed academic difficulties in school-aged children with ADHD, but few studies ...
Stanford Medicine - 7/22/2019


Study: Brain injury common in domestic violence - Advocates say lasting 'invisible' injuries often go unrecognized
Domestic violence survivors commonly suffer repeated blows to the head and strangulation, trauma that has lasting effects that should be widely recognized by advocates, health care providers, law enforcement and others who are in a position to help, according to the authors of a new study. In the first community-based study of its kind, researchers from The Ohio State University and the Ohio Domestic Violence Network found that 81 percent of women who have been abused at the ...
Ohio State University - 7/2/2019



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