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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Med Switch Not Always Best Choice With Tough Depression: Adding an antipsychotic or a second antidepressant may produce better results, researchers say
Switching to another antidepressant may not be the best way to help depression patients who don't respond to the first antidepressant they take, a new study indicates. Among more than 1,500 depression patients at 35 U.S. Veterans Health Administration medical centers, better symptom relief was achieved when people were prescribed an antipsychotic medication or a second antidepressant rather than being switched to another antidepressant, the researchers found.
HealthDay - 7/11/2017


Well-being in later life: The mind plays an important role
"Aging itself is not inevitably associated with a decline in mood and quality of life," says Prof. Karl-Heinz Ladwig, summarizing the results. "It is rather the case that psychosocial factors such as depression or anxiety impair subjective well-being, the Head of the Mental Health Research Group at the Institute of Epidemiology II, Helmholtz Zentrum München and Professor of Psychosomatic Medicine at the TUM University Hospital explains. "And in the case of women, living alone also ...
ScienceDaily - 7/7/2017


Mindfulness-based therapy may reduce stress in overweight and obese individuals
In a randomized clinical trial of women who were overweight or obese, mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) increased mindfulness and decreased stress compared with health education. In addition, fasting blood sugar levels decreased within the MBSR group, but not within the health education group.
ScienceDaily - 7/7/2017


Are we still jealous? Infidelity in the age of social media
When men and women find social media messages indicating that their partner has been cheating on them, they show the same type of jealousy behaviour as finding offline evidence that their partner has been unfaithful. This is according to Michael Dunn and Gemma Billett of Cardiff Metropolitan University in the UK, who investigated how jealousy manifests between the sexes when people find compromising messages on their partner’s social media accounts. The findings are published in ...
Springer - 7/6/2017


Research suggests association between gut bacteria and emotion
Researchers have identified gut microbiota that interact with brain regions associated with mood and behavior. This may be the first time that behavioral and neurobiological differences associated with microbial composition in healthy humans have been identified.
UCLA Health - 6/29/2017


Surprising ways to beat anxiety and become mentally strong – according to science
Do you have anxiety? Have you tried just about everything to get over it, but it just keeps coming back? Perhaps you thought you had got over it, only for the symptoms to return with a vengeance? Whatever your circumstances, science can help you to beat anxiety for good. Anxiety can present as fear, restlessness, an inability to focus at work or school, finding it hard to fall or stay asleep at night, or getting easily irritated. In social situations, it can make it hard to talk to others; ...
The Conversation - 6/26/2017


Eating your feelings? The link between job stress, junk food and sleep
Stress during the workday can lead to overeating and unhealthy food choices at dinnertime, but there could be a buffer to this harmful pattern. A good night’s sleep can serve as a protecting factor between job stress and unhealthy eating in the evening, indicates a new study co-authored by a Michigan State University scholar. The study, published online in the Journal of Applied Psychology, is one of the first to investigate how psychological experiences at work shape eating behaviors.
Michigan State University - 6/22/2017


Perceptions about Body Image Linked to Increased Alcohol, Tobacco Use for Teens: Findings provide support for increased body-image awareness to improve overall health
How teenagers perceive their appearance, including their body image, can have significant impacts on health and wellness. Prior body image research has shown that people with negative body image are more likely to develop eating disorders and are more likely to suffer from depression and low self-esteem. Now, Virginia Ramseyer Winter, a body image expert and an assistant professor in the University of Missouri’s School of Social Work, found negative body image also is ...
University of Missouri-Columbia - 6/21/2017


Feeling stressed? Bike to work: A Concordia study shows how a pedal-powered commute can set you up for the whole day
New research from Concordia’s John Molson School of Business (JMSB) has found that cycling can help reduce stress and improve your work performance. Researchers Stéphane Brutus, Roshan Javadian and Alexandra Panaccio compared how different modes of commuting – cycling, driving a car and taking public transport – affected stress and mood at work. The study was published in the International Journal of Workplace Health Management.
Concordia University - 6/21/2017


People who go to bed late have less control over OCD symptoms
A late bedtime is associated with lower perceived control of obsessive thoughts, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. Binghamton University Professor of Psychology Meredith E. Coles and former graduate student Jessica Schubert (now at University of Michigan Medical School) monitored twenty individuals diagnosed with OCD and ten individuals endorsing subthreshold OCD symptoms during one week of sleep. Participants ...
Binghamton University - 6/20/2017


To work or not to work: Moms' well being rests on what she wants: New research shows that among well-educated moms, when employment status is aligned with preference, well-being soars
The center of a mother's life tends to be her children and her family, but if mom is unhappy about staying home with the kids or about working outside the home then she (and anyone close to her) may suffer, according to new research from Arizona State University. In "What women want: Employment preference and adjustment among mothers," published in the early on-line edition of the Journal of Family and Economic Issues, researchers studied more than 2,000 mostly well-educated ...
Arizona State University - 6/20/2017


Hiding true self harms career and sense of belonging
Hiding your true self at work can damage your career and reduce your sense of belonging in the workplace, a new study suggests. University of Exeter researchers examined "stigmatised" characteristics - being lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT), or having a history of poverty or mental or physical illness. They found that concealing such characteristics from colleagues resulted in lower self-esteem, job satisfaction and commitment at work. "People may choose to ...
University of Exeter - 6/20/2017


How Viewing Cute Animals Can Help Rekindle Marital Spark
One of the well-known challenges of marriage is keeping the passion alive after years of partnership, as passions tend to cool even in very happy relationships. In a new study, a team of psychological scientists led by James K. McNulty of Florida State University has developed an unconventional intervention for helping a marriage maintain its spark: pictures of puppies and bunnies. Previous research has shown that, in many instances, marriage satisfaction declines even when day-to-day ...
Association for Psychological Science - 6/19/2017


Sleep apnea and insomnia combination linked with depression
A new study found that men with sleep apnoea and insomnia have a higher prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms than men with sleep apnoea or insomnia alone. n the study of 700 men in the community, 43% of those with both conditions had depression, compared with 22% of those with insomnia alone and 8% of those with sleep apnoea alone. The study also found that 6.7% of men in the community had undiagnosed sleep apnoea in combination with insomnia.
EurekAlert - 6/7/2017


Overweight Kids Pay a Heavy Social Price: They tend to have fewer friends, which can lead to depression and other emotional problems, researchers say
Overweight kids are excluded and ostracized by classmates in school more often than their thinner peers, new research indicates. Examining friendship dynamics among more than 500 preteens in the Netherlands, California researchers found that those who were overweight or obese were 1.7 times more likely to be disliked by their peers. Not surprisingly, the reverse was also true. Overweight or obese preteens were 1.2 times more likely to dislike their peers, the study revealed.
HealthDay - 6/7/2017


Exercise may help combat postpartum depression
An analysis of published studies indicates that physical exercise during pregnancy and the postpartum period is a safe way to achieve better psychological well-being and to reduce postpartum depressive symptoms.
EurekAlert - 6/7/2017


Older adults under-referred for mental health therapies
A large research study from the Universities of Plymouth and Exeter has revealed that older people are not being referred for mental health support nearly as frequently as their younger counterparts despite achieving better outcomes when they are referred. The study is published today (Tuesday 6 June 2017) in the British Journal of General Practice.
University of Plymouth - 6/6/2017


How do signs of problem gambling differ in men and women?
Men and women experiencing problems with gaming machines (slot machines) display the same signs that their habit is out of control. However, the two sexes differ in how they handle the distress that accompanies their addiction. Women tend to be more emotional and more likely to cry or to look depressed when losing. Men may angrily channel their distress into striking or even kicking their gaming machine. These are the findings of researchers at the University of Adelaide, the Australian ...
Springer - 6/1/2017


Take control to become a better parent: Tantrums, picky eating and poor sleeping behavior in young children are all influenced by the control that parents feel they have on their own life
Most parents will agree that children present a never-ending series of behavioral challenges. Tantrums, picky eating and poor sleeping behavior are often cited as the more stressful part of raising a child. How parents deal with these challenges determines a child's physical, psychological and emotional development. But could something as simple as your outlook on life determine how you deal with and overcome these parenting challenges?
EurekAlert - 5/31/2017


Half of Adults With Anxiety or Depression Report Chronic Pain
In a survey of adults with anxiety or a mood disorder like depression or bipolar disorder, about half reported experiencing chronic pain, according to researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. The findings are published online in the Journal of Affective Disorders. "The dual burden of chronic physical conditions and mood and anxiety disorders is a significant and growing problem,” said Silvia Martins, MD, PhD, associate professor of Epidemiology at the Mailman ...
Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health - 5/31/2017


Depression risk following natural disaster can be predicted via pupil dilation
Pupil dilation could identify which individuals are at greatest risk for depression following disaster-related stress, and help lead to targeted interventions, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. Researchers at Binghamton University recruited 51 women who were living in the greater Binghamton, N.Y., area at the time of a catastrophic 2011 flood and who reported a life event indicating that they or their child had been impacted by the flood to ...
EurekAlert - 5/23/2017


City life could present psychosis risk for adolescents
Living in a city could significantly increase young people’s vulnerability to psychotic experiences, according to a new study from King’s College London and Duke University. Published today in Schizophrenia Bulletin, the study found that British adolescents raised in major cities in England and Wales were over 40 per cent more likely to report psychotic experiences (e.g. hearing voices and feeling extremely paranoid) than their rural counterparts. Neighbourhood conditions and crime were ...
King’s College London - 5/23/2017


Low Self-Esteem Partners Create Their Own Regret in Relationship Sacrifices
Low self-esteem partners can feel vulnerable in their relationship, including feeling insecure about their partner’s support and love. In a series of studies, social psychologists in the Netherlands show that people with low self-esteem end up regretting sacrifices they make in relationships because they do not feel appreciated or supported by their partner. The results appear in the journal, Social Psychological and Personality Science.
Society for Personality and Social Psychology - 5/18/2017


Study reveals link between chronic childhood illness and later life mental health problems
A new study into the effects of chronic physical illness in children on their life-long mental health has found that such experiences appear to increase the chances of them having depression and anxiety in adulthood. Researchers at the University of Sussex and University College London systematically reviewed evidence from a large number of medical studies, looking for associations between eight chronic physical illnesses in childhood, such as arthritis, asthma and cancer, and ...
University of Sussex - 5/12/2017


Virtual support groups help grieving spouses with depression
As the U.S. population ages, it's estimated that half of women older than 65 are widows, while one-sixth of men of the same age have lost their spouses. Support groups have proved to be a helpful resource for those dealing with grief, but for older individuals, obstacles such as geographic location and physical immobility can sometimes make it difficult to attend support groups in person.
EurekAlert - 5/10/2017


Research Evaluates Effectiveness of Yoga in Treating Major Depression
When treating depression, the goal is to help individuals achieve full recovery and normal functioning. While traditional treatment such as medication or psychotherapy is effective for many patients, some may not fully recover even with these treatments. Researchers sought to determine if the addition of hatha yoga would improve treatment outcomes for these patients. They found that the benefits of yoga were less pronounced early in treatment, but may accumulate over time.
Care New England - 5/8/2017


Ordinary sounding expressions of teen angst may signal early depression: Research at 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting finds that teens developing depression likely to use terms such as feeling 'stressed' rather than 'depressed'
While it's estimated at least one in 10 teens in the U.S. suffer from depression at some point, few will use the word "depressed" to describe negative emotions hanging over them. Instead, new research at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting in San Francisco suggests, they're likely to use terms such as "stressed," or "down," and other words that may sound like ordinary teen angst but could be a signal of more serious, pre-depressive symptoms.
EurekAlert - 5/4/2017


Analysis: Gender differences in depression appear at age 12
An analysis just published online has broken new ground by finding gender differences in both symptoms and diagnoses of depression appearing at age 12. The analysis, based on existing studies that looked at more than 3.5 million people in more than 90 countries, confirmed that depression affects far more females than males. The study, published by the journal Psychological Bulletin, should convince doubters that depression largely, but not entirely, affects females, says co-author ...
University of Wisconsin–Madison - 4/27/2017


Staking self-worth on the pursuit of money has negative psychological consequences
Although people living in consumer-based cultures such as the U.S. often believe that they will be happier if they acquire more money, the findings of a newly published paper by a University at Buffalo research team suggest that there may be downsides to this pursuit. The pursuit of money in and of itself is not bad, but there are risks to consider when it is fueled by a desire to boost self-esteem. When people tie their self-worth to the pursuit of financial success, they are more ...
University at Buffalo - 4/27/2017


National mental-health survey finds widespread ignorance, stigma
Less than half of Americans can recognize anxiety. Most people don't know what to do about depression even when they spot it. And nearly 8 in 10 don't recognize prescription drug abuse as a treatable problem. Those are just some of the findings of a new national survey on issues surrounding mental-health literacy by Michigan State University scholars.
ScienceDaily - 4/27/2017


The Upside of Worrying: New study by UC Riverside psychology professor shows there’s a positive side to worrying
Worry — it does a body good. And, the mind as well. A new paper by Kate Sweeny, psychology professor at the University of California, Riverside, argues there’s an upside to worrying. “Despite its negative reputation, not all worry is destructive or even futile,” Sweeny said. “It has motivational benefits, and it acts as an emotional buffer.” In her latest article, “The Surprising Upsides of Worry,” published in Social and Personality Psychology Compass, Sweeny breaks down the ...
University of California, Riverside - 4/27/2017


Study finds first molecular genetic evidence of PTSD heritability
A large new study from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium provides the first molecular genetic evidence that genetic influences play a role in the risk of getting Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) after trauma. The report extends previous findings that showed that there is some shared genetic overlap between PTSD and other mental disorders such as schizophrenia. It also finds that genetic risk for PTSD is strongest among women.
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health - 4/25/2017


Parents' use of emotional feeding increases emotional eating in school-age children
Emotional eating - eating when you feel sad or upset or in response to another negative mood - is not uncommon in children and adolescents, but why youth eat emotionally has been unclear. Now a new longitudinal study from Norway has found that school-age children whose parents fed them more to soothe their negative feelings were more likely to eat emotionally later on. The reverse was also found to be the case, with parents of children who were more easily soothed by food being ...
EurekAlert - 4/25/2017


The placebo effect can mend a broken heart too, CU Boulder study shows
Feeling heartbroken from a recent breakup? Just believing you’re doing something to help yourself get over your ex can influence brain regions associated with emotional regulation and lessen the perception of pain. That’s the takeaway from a new CU Boulder study that measured the neurological and behavioral impacts the placebo effect had on a group of recently broken-hearted volunteers. “Breaking up with a partner is one of the most emotionally negative experiences a person ...
University of Colorado Boulder - 4/24/2017


Smartphone addiction leads to personal, social, workplace problems: Females more susceptible to addiction, new research shows
Excessive smartphone use leads to problems, and females are especially susceptible to addiction, according to new research from Binghamton University- State University of New York. "Our smartphones have turned into a tool that provides short, quick, immediate satisfaction, which is very triggering," said Isaac Vaghefi, assistant professor of management information systems at Binghamton University-State University of New York. "Our neurons get fired and dopamine is ...
Binghamton University - 4/12/2017


Maternal stress during pregnancy could influence the biological clock for ageing
The stress that some mothers experience during their pregnancies could influence the genetic makeup their babies are born with and, eventually, lead to premature biological ageing and associated age-related diseases. This is according to lead authors Tabea Send and Stephanie Witt of the Central Institute of Mental Health, University of Heidelberg in Germany. The study is published in Springer Nature’s journal Neuropsychopharmacology and focuses on a person’s DNA sequences ...
Springer - 4/11/2017


Religiosity does not increase the risk of anorexia nervosa
Religiosity has been associated with various forms of fasting and self-starvation for thousands of years. Many believe that extreme religiosity can be a risk factor of anorexia nervosa. However, a recent population study conducted in Finland showed that religiosity does not increase the risk of anorexia nervosa.
University of Helsinki - 4/11/2017


Can dealing with emotional exhaustion enhance happiness?
The study examined when and how dealing with emotional exhaustion can enhance happiness in a work environment. The research was focused on the role of perceived supervisor support (PSS) - the workers’ view of their manager’s level of supportiveness, caring and appreciation for their efforts – in stimulating ways to cope with exhaustion.
University of East Anglia - 4/11/2017


Interpersonal abuse in early life may lead to concentration issues later in life: Stressors encountered may change a person's brain
Does a history of abuse before the age of 18 affect later capacity to concentrate and stay focused? According to a new study Veterans with a history of physical or sexual abuse or witnessing family violence before the age of 18 have a reduced ability to concentrate compared to Veterans who were not abused. The study, which appears in the journal Brain and Behavior, revealed that this failure to concentrate was associated with abnormal connectivity in the brain, between the amygdala, ...
EurekAlert - 4/10/2017


Study reverses thinking on genetic links to stress, depression: Scientists re-examine data exploring connection between serotonin gene, depression, stress
For years, scientists have been trying to determine what effect a gene linked to the brain chemical serotonin may have on depression in people exposed to stress. But now, analyzing information from more than 40,000 people who have been studied over more than a decade, researchers led by a team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found no evidence that the gene alters the impact stress has on depression.
Washington University School of Medicine - 4/4/2017



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