Find a Therapist at NetworkTherapy.com


Find a Therapist or Treatment Center

Highlights
   for Consumers
Find a Local Therapist
Find a Telehealth Therapist
Find a Treatment Center
About Therapy
Research a Condition
Research a Medication
Support Groups
National Hotlines
Featured Articles
What's New

   for Providers
List Your Practice
List Your Treatment Center
Publish an Article
My Account
Webmail


Therapist Index: Find a Therapist by Location
   Find a Therapist by City
   Find a Therapist by State

Topic Index
   Conditions A to Z
Acute Stress
ADHD
Adjustment Disorder
Agoraphobia
Alcoholism
Alzheimer's Disease
Amnestic Disorders
Amphetamine Depen.
Anorexia
Antisocial Personality
Asperger Syndrome
Autism
Avoidant Personality
-------------------------
Bereavement
Binge Eating Disorder
Bipolar Disorder
Body Dysmorphia
Borderline Personality
Brief Psychotic Dis.
Bulimia
-------------------------
Cannabis Dependence
Child Abuse
Chronic Tics
Circadian Rhythm Dis.
Cocaine Dependence
Codependency
Conduct Disorder
Conversion Disorder
Cyclothymia
-------------------------
Delirium
Delusional Disorder
Dementia
Dependent Personality
Depersonalization
Depression
Dissociative Amnesia
Dissociative Fugue
Dissociative Identity
Domestic Violence
Dyspareunia
Dysthymia
-------------------------
Elder Abuse
Encopresis
Enuresis
Exhibitionism
Expressive Lang. Dis.
-------------------------
Factitious Disorder
Feeding Disorder
Female Orgasmic Dis.
Fetishism
Frotteurism
-------------------------
Gender Identity Dis.
Generalized Anxiety
-------------------------
Hallucinogen Depen.
Histrionic Personality
HIV/AIDS
Hypochondriasis
-------------------------
IED
Inhalant Dependence
-------------------------
Kleptomania
-------------------------
Male Erectile Disorder
Male Orgasmic Dis.
Malingering
Mathematics Disorder
Mental Retardation
-------------------------
Narcissistic Personality
Narcolepsy
Nicotine Dependence
Nightmare Disorder
-------------------------
OCD
OCPD
Opioid Dependence
Oppositional Defiant
-------------------------
Pain Disorder
Panic Disorder
Paranoid Personality
Pathological Gambling
Pedophilia
Phencyclidine Depen.
Phonological Disorder
Pica
Postpartum Depression
Premature Ejaculation
Primary Hypersomnia
Primary Insomnia
PTSD
Pyromania
-------------------------
Reactive Attachment
Reading Disorder
Restless Legs Synd.
Rett Syndrome
Rumination Disorder
-------------------------
SAD
Schizoaffective Dis.
Schizoid Personality
Schizophrenia
Schizophreniform Dis.
Schizotypal Personality
Sedative Dependence
Selective Mutism
Self-Injury
Separation Anxiety
Sexual Abuse
Sexual Arousal Dis.
Sexual Aversion Dis.
Sexual Desire Dis.
Sexual Masochism
Sexual Sadism
Shared Psychotic Dis.
Sleep Apnea
Sleep Terror
Sleepwalking
Social Phobia
Somatization
Specific Phobia
Stereotypic Movement
Stress
Stuttering
Suicide
-------------------------
Tourette Syndrome
Transient Tics
Transvestic Fetishism
Trichotillomania
-------------------------
Vaginismus
Voyeurism
   Medications A to Z

Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
Page:   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14    Next Page  »
Greater father involvement in infant parenting is beneficial for paternal mental health
A father's involvement in the parenting of an infant is associated to a lower risk of experiencing paternal depressive symptoms during the first year of the child's life, according to a study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Psychiatry. The investigators in the larger study conducted home interviews with 881 low-income ethnically and racially diverse fathers from 5 different sites in the US, one month after the birth of a child and controlling for social and demographic ...
Frontiers - 9/23/2020


Predicting therapeutic response in depressed teen girls: Brain activity signals show who may benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy
The risk of developing major depressive disorder (MDD) surges during adolescence-particularly for girls. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be an effective treatment, but only about half of girls diagnosed with depression show significant improvement. Researchers at Harvard Medical School and McLean Hospital have now identified a non-invasive test of brain function that could help predict who will respond to CBT.
Elsevier - 9/16/2020


Systematic parental training helps the well-being of preschool children with ADHD
Research findings from Aarhus University and the Central Denmark Region's Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Centre show that quality of life is poorer for preschool children with ADHD compared to children from the control population. But the children's quality of life can be significantly improved using treatment without medication. Hyperactivity, difficulty concentrating, impulsive behaviour and problems adapting to the social ground rules. These are some of the areas in which children with ...
Aarhus University - 9/16/2020


PTSD may double risk of dementia
People who have experienced post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are up to twice as likely to develop dementia later in life, according to a new study by UCL researchers. The research, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, is the first meta-analysis of global evidence on PTSD and dementia risk. For the study, the researchers analysed findings from 13 studies conducted on four continents, including data from a total of 1,693,678 people, investigating whether a PTSD diagnosis was ...
University College London - 9/15/2020


Loneliness doubled among older adults in first months of COVID-19, poll shows: Lack of social interaction or companionship is more common among those with health issues, but neighbors, healthy habits and technology may help
Staying close to home and avoiding crowded places can help older adults reduce their risk of COVID-19. But a new national poll suggests it comes with a cost, especially for those with health challenges. In June of this year, 56% of people over the age of 50 said they sometimes or often felt isolated from others - more than double the 27% who felt that way in a similar poll in 2018. Nearly half of those polled in June of this year also said they felt more isolated than they had just before ...
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan - 9/14/2020


Certain coping strategies can help offset pandemic's mental health hits
The early days of the COVID-19 pandemic contributed to negative mental health effects for many in the U.S., according to new Penn State research. But the researchers also found that some coping techniques -- like wearing masks and focusing on self-care -- were linked with positive mental health. Erina MacGeorge, professor of communication arts and sciences, said the results -- recently published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health -- may give clues ...
Penn State - 9/14/2020


Better stress management is beneficial to newborns
A group of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been able to show that maternal psychological wellbeing during pregnancy has a positive effect on newborn infants. Increased telomere length suggests a reduced rate of cell aging, which could have an effect on children's future health. Results from this study have been published in the American Journal of Psychiatry*. A variety of pregnancy-related factors can have an impact on child development. Until now, researchers ...
Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin - 9/11/2020


Pregnant women's psychological health during the COVID-19 outbreak
A recent study that examined the psychological health of pregnant women during the COVID-19 outbreak uncovered fear and depression in many participants. The findings are published in the Journal of Clinical Nursing. In an online questionnaire completed in February 2020 by 331 pregnant women in China without COVID-19, participants were mostly worried about the following: "potential infected people were unprotected and non-isolated," "self-infection could affect the health of their ...
Wiley - 9/10/2020


Weight stigma predicts emotional distress and binge eating during COVID-19: Young adults who have experienced weight stigma have more distress and maladaptive eating behaviors during the pandemic, regardless of their body size
Hartford, CT - Links between obesity and complications of COVID-19 have received increasing attention throughout the ongoing pandemic. But a different aspect of body weight - the social stigma that people face because of their weight - may also have harmful implications for people's health during the pandemic. New research from the UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity and the University of Minnesota shows that young adults who experienced weight stigma before the ...
UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity - 9/10/2020


People with anorexia and body dysmorphic disorder show brain similarities, differences: Key patterns of brain function are more pronounced with more severe symptoms
A new UCLA study shows partially overlapping patterns of brain function in people with anorexia nervosa and those with body dysmorphic disorder, a related psychiatric condition characterized by misperception that particular physical characteristics are defective. The study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Brain Imaging and Behavior, found that abnormalities in brain function are related to severity of symptoms in both disorders, and may be useful in developing new treatment methods.
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences - 9/8/2020


COVID-stress may be hard to beat even with exercise
Exercise has been shown to reduce anxiety and stress, but it may not be enough for the levels caused by COVID-19. In a study of twins led by Washington State University researchers, people who reported increasing their physical activity after the start of COVID-19 stay-at-home orders reported higher levels of stress and anxiety than those whose activity levels stayed the same. In the study, published recently in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers analyzed data from over 900 pairs of identical ...
Washington State University - 9/8/2020


Early identification and treatment key in responding to COVID-19 health anxiety among children
Bath clinical psychologists have published advice for practitioners on responding to health anxieties among children and young people resulting from COVID-19. Early identification and treatment is vital to avoid long-term mental health consequences from COVID-19 among children and young people, say researchers. The psychologists from the University of Bath highlight how health anxieties can be triggered by changes like returning to school and argue that young people need time to ...
University of Bath - 9/4/2020


How we sleep today may forecast when Alzheimer's disease begins: Don't despair. deep, restorative sleep may defend against this virulent form of dementia
What would you do if you knew how long you had until Alzheimer’s disease set in? Don’t despair. New UC Berkeley research suggests one defense against this virulent form of dementia — for which no treatment currently exists — is deep, restorative sleep, and plenty of it. Neuroscientists Matthew Walker and Joseph Winer have found a way to estimate, with some degree of accuracy, a time frame for when Alzheimer’s is most likely to strike in a person’s lifetime. “We have found that the ...
University of California - Berkeley - 9/3/2020


How screen time and green time may affect youth psychological outcomes
Less screen time and more green time are associated with better psychological outcomes among children and adolescents, according to a study published September 4 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tassia Oswald of the University of Adelaide, and colleagues. The prevalence of mental illness among children and adolescents is increasing globally. Technological developments in recent decades have increased young people's engagement with screen-based technologies ...
PLOS - 9/3/2020


Can't be away from your phone? Study finds link to higher levels of obsession-compulsion
Feelings of panic when a person is away from their smartphone could be connected to general feelings of inadequacy and inferiority, a new study of young people in Portugal suggests. The study, published in the most recent issue of the journal Computers in Human Behavior Reports, found that gender has no bearing on whether people will feel apprehensive or anxious without their phones. But people who feel that way tend to be more anxious and obsessive-compulsive in their day-to-day ...
Ohio State University - 8/28/2020


Which OCD treatment works best? New brain study could lead to more personalized choices
New research could improve the odds that people with obsessive-compulsive disorder will receive a therapy that really works for them - something that eludes more than a third of those who currently get OCD treatment. The study, performed at the University of Michigan, suggests the possibility of predicting which of two types of therapy will help teens and adults with OCD: One that exposes them to the specific subject of their obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors, or one that focuses ...
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan - 8/28/2020


Treatment for teen anxiety: A University of Cincinnati-led study shows a particular treatment for childhood anxiety disorders could be beneficial
Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the U.S., with approximately 4.4 million children and adolescents affected, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "These disorders are not only common in children and teens, but, if untreated, result in considerable personal and economic cost over the lifetime," says Jeffrey Strawn, MD, associate professor and anxiety expert in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience at the University of ...
University of Cincinnati - 8/25/2020


A toxic trio of parental problems strongly linked to childhood sexual abuse
A new study has found that adults who had parents who struggled with substance dependence, intimate partner violence and mental illness are more than 10 times more likely to have been victims of childhood sexual abuse than those whose parents did not have these problems, once age and race are taken into account. The study, by researchers at the University of Toronto's Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work and Institute of Life Course & Aging, was published online this week in ...
University of Toronto - 8/25/2020


Who Could Benefit From Exercise and Behavioral Treatment? Depression study suggests it may be possible to predict who would benefit
Aerobic exercise clearly benefits young adults with major depression, and a Rutgers-led study suggests it may be possible to predict those who would benefit from behavioral therapy with exercise. "Our study needs to be replicated, but the precision medicine approach of predicting who may or may not benefit from exercise as an antidepressant is provocative," said senior author Brandon L. Alderman, an associate professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health in the ...
Rutgers University - 8/24/2020


Report reveals young people felt less anxious and more connected to school in lockdown
Younger teenagers in the South West of England felt less anxious and more connected to school when they were away from it during the COVID-19 global pandemic public lockdown, a first-of-its-kind study has found. The striking results of research led by the University of Bristol are published today by the National Institute for Health Research School for Public Health Research (NIHR SPHR) in a report which raises questions about the impact of the school environment on young people's ...
University of Bristol - 8/23/2020


Research reveals toll of pandemic on those with eating disorders: The COVID-19 pandemic is having a profound, negative impact on nine out of ten people with experience of eating disorders, a new study from Northumbria University, Newcastle, reveals
The COVID-19 pandemic is having a profound, negative impact on nine out of ten people with experience of eating disorders, a new study from Northumbria University, Newcastle, reveals. According to Beat, the UK's eating disorder charity, approximately 1.25 million people in the UK have an eating disorder. Until now, little was known about the impact of the pandemic on this population. While it is evident that the COVID-19 outbreak is having a significant effect on the global ...
Northumbria University - 8/23/2020


Targeted treatment for depression could benefit patients with psychosis
Patients with early onset psychosis may benefit from treatment for depression, including with anti-depressants alongside other medication, new research shows. According to scientists at the University of Birmingham's Institute for Mental Health, depression may be an intrinsic part of early phase psychotic disorders that should be treated together with other more prominent symptoms to improve patient outcomes.
University of Birmingham - 8/17/2020


Yoga shown to improve anxiety, study shows
Yoga improves symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder, a condition with chronic nervousness and worry, suggesting the popular practice may be helpful in treating anxiety in some people. Led by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, a new study found that yoga was significantly more effective for generalized anxiety disorder than standard education on stress management, but not effective as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), the gold standard form of structured talk therapy ...
NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine - 8/12/2020


Teens' social media use does not raise risk for depression: Study findings refute popular wisdom and may provide relief to parents and educators concerned with adolescents' heavy use of social media--particularly during the COVID crisis
Contrary to popular wisdom, daily social media use is not a strong or consistent risk factor for depressive symptoms among adolescents, according to a new study by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health researchers. The results are published in the Journal of Adolescent Health. "Increasingly, teenagers are active on social media, particularly during the pandemic, as they have to rely on Instagram, TikTok, and other platforms to stay in touch with friends," says first author ...
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health - 8/11/2020


Knowledge is power: Learning more about COVID-19 can reduce your pandemic stress
A new study from North Carolina State University and the Georgia Institute of Technology finds that the more people know about COVID-19, the less pandemic-related stress they have. The study also found that making plans to reduce stress was also effective for older adults - but not for adults in their 40s or younger. "COVID-19 is a new disease - it's not something that people worried about before," says Shevaun Neupert, a professor of psychology at NC State and co-author of the study.
North Carolina State University - 8/10/2020


Study Pinpoints Five Most Likely Causes of Post-Traumatic Stress in Police Officers
A combination of genetic and emotional differences may lead to post-traumatic stress (PTS) in police officers, a new study finds. Based on biological studies of officers in major cities, the study showed that the most significant PTS predictors are the tendency to startle at sudden sounds, early career displays of mental health symptoms (e.g., anxiety and depression), and certain genetic differences, including some known to influence a person's immune system.
NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine - 8/10/2020


Prenatal depression alters child's brain connectivity, affects behavior: Weakened brain connections may mediate prenatal depression's influence on child behavior
Altered brain connectivity may be one way prenatal depression influences child behavior, according to new research in JNeurosci. Up to one fifth of women experience depression symptoms during pregnancy, with unknown effects on the fetus. Prenatal depression is correlated with behavioral and developmental issues in the child, as well as an increased risk of developing depression at age 18. But how prenatal depression leads to these changes remains unclear.
Society for Neuroscience - 8/10/2020


How building features impact veterans with PTSD: Texas A&M researchers identified features in the design of public and private spaces that make a difference toward comfort
The built environment, where someone lives (private) or works (public), influences a person's daily life and can help, or hinder, their mental health. This is especially true for those with mental health conditions such as PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder. Researchers in the Wm Michael Barnes '64 Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Texas A&M University are working to determine which elements of built environments affect veterans with PTSD the most, and how they can ...
Texas A&M University - 8/10/2020


Large study confirms vitamin D does not reduce risk of depression in adults
Vitamin D supplementation does not protect against depression in middle-age or older adulthood according results from one of the largest ever studies of its kind. This is a longstanding question that has likely encouraged some people to take the vitamin. In this study, however, "There was no significant benefit from the supplement for this purpose. It did not prevent depression or improve mood," says Olivia I. Okereke, MD, MS, of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH's Psychiatry Department.
Massachusetts General Hospital - 8/4/2020


Lockdown study reports surge in health anxieties: New research into people’s coping strategies faced with COVID-19 highlights the mental health toll for those shielding
Coronavirus and the imposition of lockdown this year ‘significantly raised’ mental health challenges, particularly so for the most vulnerable groups, including those shielding, according to the first study to look at people’s coping styles in face of the pandemic. The new research, published today [Tuesday 4 August 2020] in the journal American Psychologist, draws on survey responses from over 800 people recruited online and via social media who answered questions over a ten-day period ...
University of Bath - 8/4/2020


Pandemic leads to higher depression, anxiety and fear, studies show: Research by U of A sociologists from early in COVID-19's spread shows increased levels of suicidial thoughts and other psychological trauma
The COVID-19 pandemic led to higher levels of depression, anxiety, suicidal tendencies and psychological trauma among American adults during the early months of its spread, according to three new studies published by University of Arkansas sociologists. Using an internet survey distributed in the last week of March that sampled 10,368 adults from across the country, researchers have sought to better understand the sociological and psychological effects of the pandemic. The common ...
University of Arkansas - 7/31/2020


Major depressive episodes far more common than previously believed, new Yale study finds
The number of adults in the United States who suffer from major depressive episodes at some point in their life is far higher than previously believed, a new study by the Yale School of Public Health finds. National survey data currently shows that approximately 17% of women and 10% of men report having a history of major depressive episodes (MDEs) in their lifetimes. But these data are subject to "recall error," or the tendency of people to forget or misreport their health histories when ...
Yale School of Public Health - 7/30/2020


Laughter acts as a stress buffer -- and even smiling helps
People who laugh frequently in their everyday lives may be better equipped to deal with stressful events - although this does not seem to apply to the intensity of laughter. These are the findings reported by a research team from the University of Basel in the journal PLOS ONE. It is estimated that people typically laugh 18 times a day - generally during interactions with other people and depending on the degree of pleasure they experience. Researchers have also reported differences related ...
University of Basel - 7/30/2020


Study highlights mental health risks facing healthcare workers during pandemic
A new study finds that healthcare workers in the United States are struggling with a suite of mental-health challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study reports that healthcare workers are at greater risk than the general public of experiencing health problems such as depression. One striking finding is that, on average, healthcare professionals reported enough symptoms of depression to be diagnosed with clinical depression.
North Carolina State University - 7/30/2020


Pediatric experts offer tips for children's mental health in transition back to school
Whether returning to a school building, online learning or a hybrid school environment, it is normal for children and adolescents to have some stress or anxiety about going back to school. This year, fears of getting sick, school safety protocols for COVID-19 or heightened tensions around racism may make the transition even more difficult. "There are a range of mental health concerns that children can face in school from minor stressors such as nerves about an upcoming tests or ...
Nationwide Children's Hospital - 7/29/2020


Increased attention to sad faces predicts depression risk in teenagers
Teenagers who tend to pay more attention to sad faces are more likely to develop depression, but specifically within the context of stress, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. Researchers at Binghamton University, led by graduate student Cope Feurer and Professor of Psychology Brandon Gibb, aimed to examine whether attentional biases to emotional stimuli, assessed via eye tracking, serve as a marker of risk for depression for teenagers.
Binghamton University - 7/28/2020


Therapy helps children with food allergies manage severe anxiety: Cognitive behavioral therapy works for children with phobia of anaphylaxis
Imagine a young girl with a peanut allergy, so stricken by fear of anaphylaxis that she no longer takes part in everyday activities many children take for granted. She's stopped playing with her siblings, worried that residue from their peanut butter crackers may trigger an allergic reaction. She obsessively washes her hands to make sure there is no trace of peanut on them. She worries that every stomachache could mean she accidently ate something she was allergic to.
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - 7/28/2020


About nine family members to suffer grief from every COVID-19 fatality
Deaths from COVID-19 will have a ripple effect causing impacts on the mental health and health of surviving family members. But the extent of that impact has been hard to assess until now. Every death from COVID-19 will impact approximately nine surviving family members, according to a study. In a study of kinship networks in the United States, the researchers said that approximately nine surviving close family members will be affected by each death from the virus in the country.
Penn State - 7/13/2020


People with coronavirus symptoms more likely to have psychiatric disorders and loneliness
People who have or had COVID-19 symptoms are more likely to develop general psychiatric disorders and are lonelier, with women and young people more at risk, says a just-published study co-authored at Cambridge Judge Business School. Having a job and living with a partner are significant protective factors against general psychiatric disorders and loneliness, says the study in the journal Psychiatry Research, based on 15,530 UK respondents, which is described as the first ...
University of Cambridge - 7/13/2020


New study outlines best practices for delivering care via telehealth
The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted a rapid expansion of telehealth use in the U.S. While articles have been published on telehealth and best practices for patient-centered communication during the crisis, none have focused on applying principles of trauma-informed care until now. COVID-19 is traumatizing for many and has a disproportionate impact on those who have prior trauma exposure and mental health conditions. Catastrophic events, such as natural disasters and ...
Boston University School of Medicine - 7/9/2020



Page:   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14    Next Page  »



Home  |  Provider Directory  |  Mental Health Library  |  Resource Center  |  For Providers
Find a Therapist  |  Find a Treatment Center  |  List Your Practice  |  List Your Treatment Center
About Us  |  Contact Us  |  User Agreement  |  Privacy Policy  |  Site Map
The information provided on this site is for educational or informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical or behavioral health care advice. The information is not intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care provider. Please consult your health care provider if you have any questions or concerns about your health.
Copyright © 2000-2020 NetworkTherapy.com, Inc. All rights reserved.
Welcome Guestbook What's New Site Map Find a Therapist Find a Treatment Center About Therapy Frequently Asked Questions Disorders & Conditions Medications Treatment Approaches Featured Articles News Archive Mental Health Dictionary Support Groups National Hotlines Web Directory Mental Health Books Related Web Sites For Providers Provider Login Back to top of page