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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Reconnecting with nature key for the health of people and the planet
Individuals who visit natural spaces weekly, and feel psychologically connected to them, report better physical and mental wellbeing, new research has shown. Alongside the benefits to public health, those who make weekly nature visits, or feel connected to nature, are also more likely to behave in ways which promote environmental health, such as recycling and conservation activities. The findings of the study, published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology, indicate that reconnecting ...
University of Plymouth - 2/13/2020


Gut feelings: Gut bacteria are linked to our personality
Dr Katerina Johnson, who conducted her PhD in the University's Department of Experimental Psychology, was researching the science of that 'gut feeling' - the relationship between the bacteria living in the gut (the gut microbiome) and behavioural traits. In a large human study she found that both gut microbiome composition and diversity were related to differences in personality, including sociability and neuroticism.
University of Oxford - 2/12/2020


Nutrition a key ingredient for psychological health in Canadian adults
A new study investigating factors that contribute to psychological distress in adults has found that that risk of malnourishment is linked to psychological distress among Canadians aged 45 years and older. "These findings are consistent with other research which has found links between poor quality diet, and depression, bipolar disorder, and psychological distress," says study lead Dr. Karen Davison, Health Science faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in ...
University of Toronto - 2/12/2020


Sitting still linked to increased risk of depression in adolescents
Too much time sitting still - sedentary behaviour - is linked to an increased risk of depressive symptoms in adolescents, finds a new UCL-led study. The Lancet Psychiatry study found that an additional 60 minutes of light activity (such as walking or doing chores) daily at age 12 was associated with a 10% reduction in depressive symptoms at age 18. "Our findings show that young people who are inactive for large proportions of the day throughout adolescence face a greater risk of ...
University College London - 2/11/2020


A happy partner leads to a healthier future: Science confirms: 'happy wife, happy life.'
Science now supports the saying, “happy wife, happy life.” Michigan State University research found that those who are optimistic contribute to the health of their partners, staving off the risk factors leading to Alzheimer’s disease, dementia and cognitive decline as they grow old together. “We spend a lot of time with our partners,” said William Chopik, assistant professor of psychology and co-author of the study. “They might encourage us to exercise, eat healthier or remind us to take our ...
Michigan State University - 2/10/2020


Review of evidence finds excessive smartphone, social media use may be linked to youth mental health
A new article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) reviews evidence that suggests an association between excessive smartphone and social media use and mental distress and suicidality among adolescents. The authors say this should be among the factors considered by clinicians and researchers who work in the field of youth mental health. The analysis, led by The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), focuses on smartphone use and does not consider online gaming. It contains ...
Canadian Medical Association Journal - 2/10/2020


Family dynamics may influence suicidal thoughts in children: A look at 9- and 10-year olds reveals they do think about suicide, even if their caregivers don't know
Death by suicide in children has reached a 30-year high in the United States. During middle and high school, 10 to 15% of kids have thoughts of suicide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How early in a child's life do these thoughts begin? New research from Washington University in St. Louis is narrowing the gap in psychology's understanding of suicidal thoughts in young people, the findings show that such thoughts begin as early as 9 and 10 years old.
Washington University in St. Louis - 2/7/2020


Suicidal thoughts among US Army soldiers deployed to Afghanistan
Among nearly 4,000 U.S. Army soldiers deployed in Afghanistan, 11.7% reported suicidal thoughts at some point in their lives, 3.0% within the past year and 1.9% within the past 30 days on questionnaires completed at the midpoint of their deployment in 2012. This observational study used the questionnaires to analyze how common suicidal ideation and mental health disorders were during combat deployment and to examine the associated risk factors. The study is unique in its ...
JAMA Network Open - 1/29/2020


Unhealthy and unhappy -- the mental toll of troubled relationships: Some forms of domestic violence double victims' risk of depression and anxiety disorders later in life, according to research
Some forms of domestic violence double victims' risk of depression and anxiety disorders later in life, according to University of Queensland research. The UQ School of Public Health study found many victims of intimate partner violence at 21 showed signs of mental illness at the age of 30, with women more likely to develop depression and men varying anxiety disorders. Intimate partner violence classifies physical abuse as pushing, shoving and smacking.
University of Queensland - 1/28/2020


When caregivers need care: Caregivers less likely to access needed services, have health insurance, study finds
People who regularly care for or assist a family member or friend with a health problem or disability are more likely to neglect their own health, particularly by not having insurance or putting off necessary health services due to cost, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association. “Caregivers provide tremendous benefits for their loved ones, yet they may be at risk for lacking access to needed services which puts their health in jeopardy,” ...
American Psychological Association - 1/23/2020


Cyberbullying linked to increased depression and PTSD
Cyberbullying had the impact of amplifying symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in young people who were inpatients at an adolescent psychiatric hospital, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. The study addressed both the prevalence and factors related to cyberbullying in adolescent inpatients. "Even against a backdrop of emotional challenges in the kids we studied, we noted cyberbullying had an adverse impact. It's real and ...
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine - 1/21/2020


Faking emotions at work does more harm than good: Making an effort to actually feel positive emotions, rather than faking them, can produce personal and professional benefits, according to research
The adage "Fake it until you make it" - the idea that someone can fake a positive attitude to elicit real-life benefits - often backfires when used with co-workers, according to a study led by a University of Arizona researcher. Instead, researchers say, making an effort to actually feel the emotions you display is more productive. Allison Gabriel, associate professor of management and organizations in the Eller College of Management, led a team that analyzed two types of emotion regulation ...
University of Arizona - 1/17/2020


Study sheds light on link between cannabis, anxiety and stress
A molecule produced by the brain that activates the same receptors as marijuana is protective against stress by reducing anxiety-causing connections between two brain regions, Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers report. This finding, published today in Neuron, could help explain why some people use marijuana when they're anxious or under stress. It could also mean that pharmacologic treatments that increase levels of this molecule, known as "2-AG," in the brain could ...
Vanderbilt University Medical Center - 1/13/2020


Study finds potential new treatment for preventing post traumatic stress disorder: Discovery of biomarker unique to people with PTSD a world first
Research led by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation points to a groundbreaking discovery about a new potential treatment and prevention for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The research team, led by Dr. Fang Liu, Senior Scientist and Head of Molecular Neuroscience in CAMH's Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, and Professor and Co-director of Division of Neuroscience and Clinical Translation, ...
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health - 1/13/2020


Lonely in a crowd: Overcoming loneliness with acceptance and wisdom -- Study looked at characteristics of loneliness in a senior housing community and the strategies residents used to overcome it
By nature, human beings are social creatures. Yet, as we age, personal dynamics and lifestyles change, which can result in loneliness and isolation. With older adults increasingly moving into senior living or retirement communities, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine sought to identify the common characteristics of residents who feel lonely in these environments.
University of California - San Diego - 1/10/2020


Harvard researchers help explain link between emotion and addictive substance use: In set of four integrated studies, Harvard researchers find that sadness, but not all negative emotions, heightens craving to smoke and likelihood of relapse
What drives a person to smoke cigarettes - and keeps one out of six U.S. adults addicted to tobacco use, at a cost of 480,000 premature deaths each year despite decades of anti-smoking campaigns? What role do emotions play in this addictive behavior? Why do some smokers puff more often and more deeply or even relapse many years after they've quit? If policy makers had those answers, how could they strengthen the fight against the global smoking epidemic?
Harvard Kennedy School - 1/9/2020


Parents aren't powerless when it comes to sleep-deprived teenagers
Teenagers in the US simply don't get enough shut eye. The consequences of this epidemic of sleep deprivation are extensive and include increasing rates of anxiety and depression among adolescents, as well as suicidal thoughts and actions. Sleep-deprived teens are more likely to be involved in car crashes, and run a higher risk of injury during sports-related activities. Experts have pointed to various reasons for the chronic teenage sleep deficit: growing homework loads, too many ...
University of Rochester - 1/9/2020


Cigarette smoke damages our mental health, too
For decades, doctors have warned us about the health risks of smoking. However, their warnings focused on the physical risks that cigarettes pose to our health, such as lung cancer, heart disease, low birth weight, and high blood pressure, among others. Now, Professor Hagai Levine at Hebrew University of Jerusalem's-Hadasssah Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine has published findings related to the mental health risks related to smoking.
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem - 1/8/2020


Some surprisingly good news about anxiety
Anxiety disorders are the most common type of psychiatric illness, yet researchers know very little about factors associated with recovery. A new University of Toronto study investigated three levels of recovery in a large, representative sample of more than 2,000 Canadians with a history of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The study reports that 72% of Canadians with a history of GAD have been free of the mental health condition for at least one year. Overall, 40% were in a state of ...
University of Toronto - 1/7/2020


Air pollution in childhood linked to schizophrenia
Air pollution affects physical health, and research results now conclude that it also affects our psychological health. The study, which combines genetic data from iPSYCH with air pollution data from the Department of Environmental Science, shows that children who are exposed to a high level of air pollution while growing up, have an increased risk of developing schizophrenia.
Aarhus University - 1/7/2020


Health ranks as top concern for Veterans immediately after military service: Findings based on survey of nearly 10,000 veterans
In the months after separating from military service, most veterans are less satisfied with their health than with their work or social relationships, found a study by Veterans Affairs researchers. While the veterans surveyed were mostly satisfied with their work and social well-being, a majority were dealing with chronic physical health conditions and a third reported chronic mental health conditions. According to Dr. Dawne Vogt of the VA Boston Healthcare System and Boston University, ...
Veterans Affairs Research Communications - 1/2/2020


Augmenting attention treatment therapies for difficult-to-treat anxiety in children and adolescents: First study to show that anxiety could be decreased in youth who did not respond to earlier cognitive-behavior therapy
Between 30 to 50 percent of youth in the United States diagnosed with an anxiety disorder fail to respond to cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT). A new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that computer-based attention training could reduce anxiety in children and adolescents. "CBT is the leading evidence-based psychosocial treatment," said co-lead author Jeremy Pettit, PhD, a Professor in ...
Elsevier - 12/19/2019


Which is more effective for treating PTSD: Medication, or psychotherapy? A systematic review and meta-analysis finds there is insufficient evidence at present to answer that question
A new study that sought to find out whether serotonin reuptake inhibitors or trauma-focused psychotherapy is more effective in treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) concluded there is insufficient evidence at present to make that determination. "Because of these findings, we recommend that, until we have evidence from head-to-head trials favoring one treatment or the other, clinicians should make shared decisions, with patients, about which treatment modality to use," ...
University of North Carolina Health Care - 12/19/2019


Focus on teenage anxiety may help early identification of those at risk of eating disorders
Teenage girls who experience clinical levels of anxiety could be at greater risk of eating disorders, according to associations identified in a study completed by researchers at the University of Bristol with UCL. Published today [18 December] in European Eating Disorders Review, the new research looked at anxiety disorder pathology and engagement with severe levels of fasting (not eating for an entire day) in 2,406 teenage girls of Bristol's Children of the 90s study.
University of Bristol - 12/18/2019


CBT for social anxiety may have a protective effect on cells
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for patients with social anxiety not only helps to reduce anxiety levels but also seems to protect against accelerated cellular ageing, a study involving researchers at Karolinska Institutet published in the journal Translational Psychiatry reports. "This is the first step towards better understanding the link between cellular ageing and the treatment of psychiatric issues," says lead author Kristoffer Månsson, researcher at the Department of Clinical ...
Karolinska Institutet - 12/18/2019


Rates of depression and substance use higher for pregnant teens, study finds
Researchers from Lawson Health Research Institute and Brescia University College found that teenage pregnant women are more likely to live in poverty, have poorer mental health and have higher rates of substance use. There are limited Canadian studies on teenage pregnancies, in particular looking at risk factors and birth outcomes compared to women who became pregnant during adulthood. London researchers were able to take advantage of a large sample of pregnant women ...
Lawson Health Research Institute - 12/18/2019


Depression and suicide risk linked to air pollution
People exposed to higher levels of air pollution are more likely to experience depression or die by suicide, finds a new analysis led by UCL. The first systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence connecting air pollution and a range of mental health problems, published in Environmental Health Perspectives, reviewed study data from 16 countries. The researchers found that, if the relationship with depression reported in some of these studies is causal, then reducing global ...
University College London - 12/18/2019


Study reveals increased cannabis use in individuals with depression
The prevalence of cannabis, or marijuana, use in the United States increased from 2005 to 2017 among persons with and without depression and was approximately twice as common among those with depression in 2017. The findings, which are published in Addiction, come from a survey-based study of 728,691 persons aged 12 years or older. "Perception of great risk associated with regular cannabis use was significantly lower among those with depression in 2017, compared with those ...
Wiley - 12/9/2019


Bullying others increases the risk of developing mental health problems and vice versa
A new study at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health suggests there is a two-way relationship between bullying perpetration and mental health problems among youth in the U.S. Researchers report that bullying perpetration increased the risk of developing internalizing problems, and having internalizing problems increased the probability of bullying others. While previous research has focused on the causes and consequences of bullying victimization, this is the first study to ...
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health - 12/4/2019


Single dose of ketamine plus talk therapy may reduce alcohol use
A single infusion of ketamine, combined with outpatient behavioral therapy, helped alcohol-dependent individuals abstain from drinking for a few weeks after the treatment, researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and New York State Psychiatric Institute have found. The findings could lead to a new approach to the treatment of alcohol use disorder.
Columbia University Irving Medical Center - 12/4/2019


Exposure to smoking in early childhood linked to hyperactivity and conduct problems
In a recent study, children exposed to smoking in the first 4 years of life were more likely to exhibit symptoms of hyperactivity and conduct problems. The study, which is published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, found that the association remained even after controlling for family poverty level, parental education, parental history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, hostility, depression, caregiver IQ, and obstetric complications.
Wiley - 12/4/2019


Chronic opioid treatment may raise risk of post-traumatic stress disorder, study finds
While opioids are often prescribed to treat people with trauma-related pain, a new UCLA-led study suggests doctors should use caution before prescribing the drug to those they believe may experience severe stress in the future, in order to reduce the risk the patient will develop PTSD. In the study, researchers administered doses of the opioid morphine to a group of 22 mice for one week, then gave the mice relatively strong foot shocks. After the morphine wore off, the mice were given ...
University of California - Los Angeles - 12/3/2019


Social media could be a force for good in tackling depression but for privacy concerns
Social media has been identified by a number of studies as being a significant factor in mental health problems, especially in young people. But imagine if the power of Twitter, Facebook and Instagram could also be harnessed to identify those with depression symptoms and signpost them to support services. By analysing social media (SM) content using machine-learning techniques, it may be possible to identify which SM users are currently experiencing low mood, and then use this to ...
University of Sussex - 12/3/2019


Mental health information in rural areas is best delivered face-to-face, study shows
Mental health is a concern in rural areas, as farmers cope with stress and uncertainty due to economic and environmental conditions. Often, there are no mental health providers in the local community. Public health programs can help, but what are the best ways to reach farm populations with those programs? That’s the topic of a new study conducted by a University of Illinois researcher.
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences - 12/2/2019


Mental health program helps teens recognise and support peers at risk
A novel mental health program improves teenagers’ ability to recognise and support friends who might be at risk of suicide, according to new research. University of Melbourne researchers have evaluated the impact of teen Mental Health First Aid (tMHFA) – a universal mental health literacy program for high school students in Years 10-12 – as an intervention to improve peer support towards adolescents at risk of suicide.
University of Melbourne - 11/21/2019


Severe pregnancy-related depression may be rooted in inflammation
A runaway, inflammatory immune response may be responsible for triggering severe depression during and after pregnancy, according to a new study published in the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity. Not to be mistaken for the rapidly passing “baby blues,” which is common right after delivery, pregnancy-related depression is a serious medical condition that can escalate in severity and may even require hospitalization. One in five new mothers experience depression after ...
Van Andel Research Institute - 11/20/2019


Many patients with anorexia nervosa get better, but complete recovery elusive to most: Study highlights importance of parents in defining healing
Three in four patients with anorexia nervosa -- including many with challenging illness -- make a partial recovery. But just 21 percent make a full recovery, a milestone that is most likely to signal permanent remission. These results, and more, are drawn from an online survey of 387 parents, of whom 83 percent had children with anorexia nervosa, 6 percent with atypical anorexia nervosa -- a variant occurring in patients who are not underweight -- and the remainder with other eating disorders.
University of California - San Francisco - 11/20/2019


Omega-3 fish oil as effective for attention as ADHD drugs for some children
Researchers from King's College London and China Medical University in Taichung, Taiwan, have found omega-3 fish oil supplements improve attention among children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), but only among those with low levels of omega-3 in their blood. The researchers say their results bring a personalised medicine approach to psychiatry by demonstrating that omega-3 only works for some children with ADHD. Previous research by the same group found ...
King's College London - 11/19/2019


Husbands' stress increases if wives earn more than 40% of household income: Study of US data shows persistent social norms about male breadwinning can harm men's mental health
Husbands are least stressed when their wives earn up to 40% of household income but they become increasingly uncomfortable as their spouse's wages rise beyond that point and are most stressed when they are entirely economically dependent on their partner, new research from the University of Bath shows. The study of over 6,000 American heterosexual couples over 15 years showed husbands are anxious when they are the sole breadwinner, shouldering all the burden of ...
University of Bath - 11/19/2019


Majority of childhood sex-abuse survivors achieve complete mental health: Social isolation, chronic pain, and a history of substance dependence or depression are impediments to recovery
Most research on child sexual-abuse survivors focuses on negative consequences such as depression and suicide. A new study instead examines factors associated with resilience and flourishing among adult survivors. "Remarkably, two-thirds [65%] of the childhood sexual-abuse survivors in our sample met the criteria for complete mental health -- defined as being happy or satisfied with life most days in the past month, having high levels of social and psychological well-being in the ...
University of Toronto - 11/19/2019



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