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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
Page:   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22    Next Page  »
Study: Adolescents who consume a diet high in saturated fats may develop poor stress coping skills, signs of post-traumatic stress disorder as adults
A new study published in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity shows that adolescent rats who consume a diet high in saturated fats have a harder time coping with stress as adults. Moreover, researchers from Loma Linda University in California found that the areas of the brain that handle the fear/stress response were altered to the point that subjects began exhibiting behaviors that mirror post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
Loma Linda University Adventist Health Sciences Center - 6/13/2018


Binging, purging and fasting more common in overweight, obese young adults: Asian/Pacific Islanders, sexual minorities also at increased risk for 'disordered eating,' study shows
Young adults who are overweight or obese are twice as likely as their leaner peers to binge and purge, use laxatives or diuretics, or force themselves to vomit as a means of controlling their weight, according to a new study led by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals. These "disordered eating behaviors" put young people at risk for depression, alcohol and tobacco use, poor nutritional intake and significant weight gain over time, the researchers reported in their study, appearing in ...
University of California - San Francisco - 6/12/2018


Study: Today's dads are engaging more with their kids -- Fatherhood norms shifting alongside masculinity
Sociologists at BYU and Ball State have found that a majority of fathers today are relatively involved in their children’s lives. Whether it’s physically being there for a baseball game or piano recital, or emotionally being there to provide warmth or support in a tough time, there appears to be a shift in how fathers are viewing their roles. “We found that today’s dads spend more time, provide more care and are more loving toward their kids than ever before, ...
Brigham Young University - 6/12/2018


Researchers identify new type of depression: Protein linked with depression shows promise as new drug target
Depression is a mental disorder that affects over 300 million people around the world. While treatments exist, many of them are based on one hypothesis of how depression arises. Patients that do not fit this mold may not be getting benefits. A study led by Hiroshima University (HU), which was published online this May in Neuroscience, shed light on how one protein called RGS8 plays a role in depression behaviors. Scientists think depression occurs because of the monoamine hypothesis, ...
Hiroshima University - 6/11/2018


Negative vs. positive social media experiences and depressive symptoms
Negative experiences on social media carry more weight than positive interactions when it comes to the likelihood of young adults reporting depressive symptoms, according to a new University of Pittsburgh analysis. The finding, reported today in the journal Depression and Anxiety, may be useful for designing interventions and clinical recommendations to reduce the risk of depression. "We found that positive experiences on social media were not related or only very slightly linked to ...
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences - 6/7/2018


Maternal depressive emotion associated with children's sleep problems: Study finds increased happiness during pregnancy decreases sleep disturbances for kids
Maternal depressive mood during the prenatal and postnatal periods is related to child sleep disturbances, according to recent pilot data from a longitudinal cohort study in kindergarten children. "The most surprising thing about our results was the mediation role of child behavior in the maternal emotion-children's sleep quality relationship, this demonstrates that emotion during pregnancy affects child behavior which further affects child's sleep, said principal investigator and lead ...
American Academy of Sleep Medicine - 6/5/2018


Why are migraine patients skipping effective behavioral treatments? New study found only half of patients referred for migraine therapy actually made appointments
Effective behavioral treatments for migraine are being eschewed by a significant number of sufferers, according to a new study led by headache researchers at NYU School of Medicine. Researchers found that about half of migraine patients who were referred by a headache center for specific behavioral treatment did not follow through with therapy. This occurred despite the fact that these treatments are considered first-line, safe and effective treatments by medical guidelines.
NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine - 6/5/2018


Study links screen time to insomnia symptoms and depressive symptoms in adolescents: Regulating screen times may improve sleep health and reduce depression
Preliminary results from a new study indicate that greater amounts of daily screen time are associated with more insomnia symptoms and shorter sleep duration among adolescents. Results show that for social messaging, web surfing and TV/movie watching, insomnia symptoms and sleep duration fully explained the association between screen-based activities and depressive symptoms. "Higher rates of depressive symptoms among teens may be partially explained through the ...
American Academy of Sleep Medicine - 6/4/2018


Mothers with high emotional, cognitive control help kids behave: Study has implications for reducing harsh verbal parenting and poor child behavior
A new parenting study led by BYU professor Ali Crandall finds that the greater emotional control and problem-solving abilities a mother has, the less likely her children will develop behavioral problems, such as throwing tantrums or fighting. The study also found mothers who stay in control emotionally are less likely to be verbally harsh with their children, and mothers who stay in control cognitively are less likely to have controlling parenting attitudes. Both harsh verbal parenting and ...
Brigham Young University - 5/31/2018


For Anxiety, Single Intervention Is Not Enough: Only 20 percent of youth treated for anxiety stay well over the next four years
No matter which treatment they get, only 20 percent of young people diagnosed with anxiety will stay well over the long term, UConn Health researchers report in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. "When you see so few kids stay non-symptomatic after receiving the best treatments we have, that's discouraging," says UConn Health psychologist Golda Ginsburg. She suggests that regular mental health checkups may be a better way to treat anxiety than ...
University of Connecticut - 5/31/2018


Having an abortion does not lead to depression, research by Dr. Julia Steinberg shows
Having an abortion does not increase a woman’s risk for depression, according to a new study of nearly 400,000 women published today in JAMA Psychiatry. While previous research has found abortion does not harm women’s mental health, studies claiming that it does continue to be published and state policies that restrict access to abortion in the United States have been justified by claims that abortion causes women psychological harm. To better understand the relationship ...
University of Maryland - 5/30/2018


Goal conflict linked to psychological distress
Being torn about which personal goals to pursue is associated with symptoms of psychological distress, new research shows. A survey of more than 200 young adults by the University of Exeter and Edith Cowan University (ECU) investigated two forms of motivational conflict. These were inter-goal conflict (when pursuing one goal makes it difficult to pursue another) and ambivalence (conflicting feelings about particular goals). "People with poorer mental health are more likely to report ...
University of Exeter - 5/25/2018


Antidepressant use may contribute to long-term population weight gain
Researchers at King's College London have found that patients prescribed any of the 12 most commonly used antidepressants were 21% more likely to experience an episode of gain weight than those not taking the drugs, (after adjusting for other factors which might affect this result). The full research is published in the BMJ. They also found that the increased relative risk of weight gain hits its peak after two to three years of continued use and that for patients classified as ...
King's College London - 5/23/2018


Posttraumatic stress affects academics
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) caused by traumatic military experiences is associated with feelings of anxiety, anger, sadness and/or guilt. New Penn State research is evaluating how PTSD symptoms increase risks for academic difficulties as well. Steffany Fredman, assistant professor of human development and family studies and the Karl R. Fink and Diane Wendle Fink Early Career Professor for the Study of Families, wanted to explore one potential process by which PTSD ...
Penn State - 5/22/2018


Developmental psychotherapy for antisocial adolescents
Antisocial behavior is common during adolescence and incurs significant costs both for society and for the young people themselves. While most adolescents will not continue on a trajectory of antisocial behavior as they age, they may still be affected years later in terms of educational and employment opportunities. Moreover, persistent antisocial behavior places a heavy burden on the community, the justice system, and the public health system. Consequences include high levels of personal ...
Bentham Science Publishers - 5/18/2018


New hope for patients with depression and anxiety: Strong link between depression and anxiety disorders with chronic thyroid disease
There is a strong link between depression and anxiety disorders and autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT), a chronic thyroid condition affecting approximately 10 percent of the population. Scientists at FAU have now proven that special treatment could help many sufferers, especially women. Their findings have been published in the leading international psychiatry journal ‘JAMA Psychiatry’ from the American Medical Association ...
University of Erlangen-Nuremberg - 5/15/2018


Job strain linked to onset of common mental illness: Workplaces that reduce job strain could prevent up to 14 percent of new cases of common mental illness from occurring, according to new research
Published today in The Lancet Psychiatry, the results from the study confirm that high job strain is associated with an increased risk of developing common mental disorders such as depression and anxiety amongst middle-aged workers. Job strain is a term used to describe the combination of high work pace, intensity, and conflicting demands, coupled with low control or decision-making capacity.
Black Dog Institute - 5/14/2018


How parents cause children's friendships to end
Making a friend is hard work. Keeping one is even harder, especially for young children. A novel study published in the Journal of Family Psychology sheds light on why childhood friendships fall apart and is the first to demonstrate that parents are an important source of these breakups. Looking at data from 1,523 children (766 boys) from grades one to six, researchers from Florida Atlantic University and the University of Jyvaskyla in Finland conducted a survival analysis to identify the ...
Florida Atlantic University - 5/10/2018


Progress in posttraumatic stress disorder --Increased understanding points to new approaches for PTSD prevention and treatment
Recent advances in scientific understanding of how posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops and persists may lead to more effective treatment and even prevention of this debilitating disorder, according to the May/June special issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry, published by Wolters Kluwer. A growing body of evidence helps psychiatrists to understand the aspects of brain structure and function involved in PTSD, informing efforts to interrupt the processes leading to the development ...
Wolters Kluwer Health - 5/9/2018


Basing everyday decisions on risk of pain or loss linked to increased anxiety
Scientists have shone new light on how the human brain uses past experiences and generalizes them to future events, helping us safely navigate the world around us, a study in eLife reveals. Our ability to 'generalize' is an important survival technique, but over-generalizing from bad events could explain why some people fear and then avoid scenarios that are not actually dangerous. This over-avoidance has been identified as a significant factor in anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, ...
eLife - 5/9/2018


Depression linked to memory problems and brain aging
Depression in older adults may be linked to memory problems, according to a study published in the May 9, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also showed that older people with greater symptoms of depression may have structural differences in the brain compared to people without symptoms. "Since symptoms of depression can be treated, it may be possible that treatment may also reduce thinking and memory ...
American Academy of Neurology - 5/9/2018


At-risk adolescents are less likely to express depression on social media as they age
Findings from a new study reveal at-risk adolescents are less likely to post about depressive symptoms on social media as they age. The research suggests that adolescents with a diagnosis of depression may feel less stigmatized describing depressed mood on social media than previously hypothesized. The research will be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2018 Meeting in Toronto. Social media use can provide important information on the mental health of ...
Pediatric Academic Societies - 5/5/2018


Daily photography improves wellbeing: Taking a photo each day and posting it online has complex benefits
Taking a photo each day and posting it online has complex benefits say researchers who say it supports improved wellbeing. This is a popular social phenomenon, with Instagram having over 1.5million photos tagged #365 for each day of the year while there are thousands of members of Blipfoto, a key photo-a-day site. A study co-authored by Dr Liz Brewster of Lancaster University and Dr Andrew Cox of the University of Sheffield recorded what photos people took, what text they ...
Lancaster University - 4/30/2018


Parents may help prep kids for healthier, less violent relationships
Warm, nurturing parents may pass along strategies for building and maintaining positive relationships to their kids, setting them up for healthier, less-violent romantic relationships as young adults, according to researchers. Researchers found that when adolescents reported a positive family climate and their parents using more effective parenting strategies -- like providing reasons for decisions and refraining from harsh punishments -- those adolescents tended to go on to have better ...
Penn State - 4/27/2018


Unprecedented study identifies 44 genetic risk factors for major depression
A global research project has mapped out the genetic basis of major depression, identifying 44 genetic variants which are risk factors for depression, 30 of which are newly discovered. The study, by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium and co-led in the UK by King's College London, is the largest study to-date of genetic risk factors for major depression.
King's College London - 4/26/2018


Maternal binge drinking linked to mood problems and alcohol abuse in offspring: Study shows for first time that binge drinking during pregnancy and lactation may make offspring more vulnerable to mood disturbances and alcohol abuse as adolescents
Binge drinking by pregnant and lactating mothers can impair the mental health of their offspring, reports a study published today in Frontiers in Psychiatry. In a rat model, Italian researchers find that while habitual drinking is associated with anxiety type of behaviors in mothers and their offspring, intermittent or binge drinking has a depressive effect. Moreover, offspring of binge-drinking mothers were less responsive to natural stimuli, showed greater "despair" behavior, and were more ...
Frontiers - 4/25/2018


New studies show dark chocolate consumption reduces stress and inflammation: Data represent first human trials examining the impact of dark chocolate consumption on cognition and other brain functions
New research shows there might be health benefits to eating certain types of dark chocolate. Findings from two studies being presented today at the Experimental Biology 2018 annual meeting in San Diego show that consuming dark chocolate that has a high concentration of cacao (minimally 70% cacao, 30% organic cane sugar) has positive effects on stress levels, inflammation, mood, memory and immunity. While it is well known that cacao is a major source of flavonoids, ...
Loma Linda University Adventist Health Sciences Center - 4/24/2018


Study shows cognitive behavioural therapy can improve emotion regulation in children with autism
New research from York University’s Faculty of Health shows cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can help children with autism manage not only anxiety but other emotional challenges, such as sadness and anger. Led by Jonathan Weiss, associate professor in the Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health and CIHR Chair in Autism Spectrum Disorders Treatment and Care Research, the study shows CBT can lead to significant improvements in children’s emotional regulation.
York University - 4/24/2018


More than 1 in 20 US children and teens have anxiety or depression
About 2.6 million American children and adolescents had diagnosed anxiety and/or depression in 2011-12, reports an analysis of nationwide data in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. The number of children with diagnosed anxiety - but not depression - has increased in recent years, according to the new report.
Wolters Kluwer Health - 4/24/2018


Engaging in physical activity decreases people's chance of developing depression
An international team including researchers from King's College London have found physical activity can protect against the emergence of depression, regardless of age and geographical region. The researchers from Brazil, Belgium, Australia, USA, UK and Sweden pooled data from 49 unique cohort studies of people free from mental illness that examined if physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of developing depression.
King's College London - 4/24/2018


Volunteering Reduces Loneliness In Widowed Older Adults, Study Finds
Widowed older adults can reduce the loneliness that results from the death of a spouse by volunteering 100 hours per year, which is about two hours per week, according to a recent study. The study examined whether becoming a volunteer at the time of widowhood is associated with reducing the risks of loneliness, which is a significant public health concern, particularly for those who have lost a spouse, linked to poorer physical health, depression and even earlier mortality.
Georgia State University - 4/16/2018


Depression study pinpoints genes that may trigger the condition
Nearly 80 genes that could be linked to depression have been discovered by scientists. The findings could help explain why some people may be at a higher risk of developing the condition, researchers say. The study could also help researchers develop drugs to tackle mental ill-health, experts say. Depression affects one in five people in the UK every year and is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Life events - such as trauma or stress - can contribute to its onset, but it is not ...
University of Edinburgh - 4/16/2018


Raw fruit and vegetables provide better mental health outcomes: Otago research
That is the simple message from University of Otago researchers who have discovered raw fruit and vegetables may be better for your mental health than cooked, canned and processed fruit and vegetables. Dr Tamlin Conner, Psychology Senior Lecturer and lead author, says public health campaigns have historically focused on aspects of quantity for the consumption of fruit and vegetables (such as 5+ a day). However, the study, just published in Frontiers in Psychology, found that ...
University of Otago - 4/15/2018


Mental disorders among leading causes of illness in children worldwide
While global rates of mental disorders in children have remained stable over time, the decline of infectious diseases will place mental disorders among the main causes of disease in children aged 4-15 years, according to a study published in the open access journal Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health.
BioMed Central - 4/11/2018


Digital addiction increases loneliness, anxiety and depression
Smartphones are an integral part of most people’s lives, allowing us to stay connected and in-the-know at all times. The downside of that convenience is that many of us are also addicted to the constant pings, chimes, vibrations and other alerts from our devices, unable to ignore new emails, texts and images. In a new study published in NeuroRegulation, San Francisco State University Professor of Health Education Erik Peper and Associate Professor of Health Education Richard Harvey ...
San Francisco State University - 4/11/2018


Marriage Reduces Depression in Couples Earning Less Than $60,000, Study Finds
People who are married and earning less than $60,000 per year in total household income have fewer symptoms of depression than comparable earning unmarried people, but for couples earning more, marriage doesn’t show the same mental health benefits, according to a study co-authored by a Georgia State University researcher. According to this study, people who have never been married and earn more than $60,000 a year have fewer symptoms of depression than comparable ...
Georgia State University - 4/10/2018


School-based yoga can help children better manage stress and anxiety: Researchers worked with a public school to add yoga and mindfulness activities to help third-graders screened for anxiety at the beginning of the school year
Participating in yoga and mindfulness activities at school helps third-graders exhibiting anxiety improve their wellbeing and emotional health, according to a new Tulane University study published in the journal Psychology Research and Behavior Management. Researchers worked with a public school in New Orleans to add mindfulness and yoga to the school's existing empathy-based programming for students needing supplementary support. Third graders who were screened for ...
Tulane University - 4/10/2018


Self-rating mental health as 'good' predicts positive future mental health
Researchers have found that when a person rates their current mental health as 'positive' despite meeting criteria for a mental health problem such as depression, it can predict good mental health in the future, even without treatment. Using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, Sirry Alang of Lehigh University and her co-authors, Donna D. McAlpine of the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, and Ellen McCreedy of Brown University, sampled people who met the criteria for ...
Lehigh University - 4/2/2018


Linking teen driving behaviors to ADHD, other mental health factors
Teenage drivers ages 16 to 19 are three times more likely to get into fatal accidents than their older counterparts. In this age group, around 20 percent in the United States have been affected by symptoms associated with mental health disorders, including 9 percent with a lifetime history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). What’s the relationship between these well-documented conclusions? That’s what Penn nursing researcher Catherine McDonald wanted to find out.
University of Pennsylvania - 3/30/2018


Study finds children with autism and ADHD at higher risk for anxiety
Children with both autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk for being diagnosed with or treated for anxiety and mood disorders, according to a study published in Pediatrics today. The study, completed by the Interactive Autism Network (IAN), is one of the largest to compare comorbidities in individuals with ASD alone to individuals with ASD and ADHD. For the study's findings, researchers from Kennedy Krieger Institute ...
GolinHarris DC - 3/30/2018



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