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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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Loneliness in youth could impact mental health over the long term: Children and adolescents more likely to experience higher rates of depression and anxiety during and after enforced isolation ends
The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated widespread social isolation, affecting all ages of global society. A new rapid review in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports on the available evidence about children and young people specifically, stating that loneliness is associated with mental health problems, including depression and anxiety-potentially affecting them years later.
Elsevier - 11/19/2020


Being alone and socializing with others each contributes differently to personal growth
How do people experience time alone and time with others? Findings from a new Bar-Ilan University study reveal the intricacies of people's experiences in these basic social conditions. The study used a unique approach of analyzing self-generated text from more than 1,700 participants who performed a sentence-completion task regarding their experience alone and their social experience when in the company of others. This approach shed light on people's perceptions when free to express ...
Bar-Ilan University - 11/19/2020


Suicidal risk during pregnancy, after childbirth on the rise
Pregnancy and the period after delivering a baby can be one of the riskiest times for depressive symptoms, with suicide among the leading causes of death among new moms. And now a new study suggests that suicide "near misses" during pregnancy and after childbirth are increasing. The prevalence of suicidal thoughts and self-harm in the year before and after giving birth nearly tripled among childbearing people between 2006 and 2017, according to the findings in JAMA Psychiatry.
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan - 11/18/2020


'Alarming' COVID-19 study shows 80% of respondents report significant symptoms of depression: Young adults across the US took part in loneliness study
A new national survey, looking at how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted young US adults' loneliness, reveals "significant depressive symptoms" in 80% of participants. Over 1,000 Americans aged 18-35 took part in the online anonymous questionnaire, which also asked the subjects to report on their anxiety and substance use. The analysed findings, published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, show that "alarming" levels of loneliness are associated with ...
Taylor & Francis Group - 11/16/2020


Suffering in silence: two-thirds of older adults say they won't treat their depression: New nationwide poll shows 1 in 3 respondents age 65+ think they can just "snap out of it"
A new nationwide poll, the GeneSight Mental Health Monitor, shows that nearly two-thirds (61%) of Americans age 65 or older who have concerns about having depression will not seek treatment. In fact, nearly 1 in 3 (33%) seniors who are concerned they might be suffering from depression believe they can "snap out" of it on their own. "The 'pull yourself up by your bootstraps' mindset of some seniors and reluctance to talk about mental health are hindering them from getting the help they need ...
GeneSight Mental Health Monitor - 11/16/2020


Burnout can exacerbate work stress, further promoting a vicious circle: Work stress and burnout are mutually reinforcing; surprisingly, the effect of work stress on burnout is much smaller than the effect of burnout on work stress
Stress and overload in the workplace are increasing worldwide and are often considered a cause of burnout. Indeed, a new study shows that work stress and burnout are mutually reinforcing. However, contrary to popular belief, burnout has a much greater impact on work stress than vice versa. "This means that the more severe a person's burnout becomes, the more stressed they will feel at work, such as being under time pressure, for example," said Professor Christian Dormann of ...
Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz - 11/10/2020


Loneliness a leading cause of depression in older adults
Loneliness is responsible for 18% of depression among people over 50 in England, according to a new study led by UCL researchers. The findings, published in The Lancet Psychiatry, suggest that almost one in five depression cases among older adults could be prevented if loneliness were eliminated. The researchers found that people's subjective experiences of loneliness contributed to depression up to 12 years later, independent of more objective measures of social isolation.
University College London - 11/9/2020


COVID-19 triggers OCD in children and young people: Many children and young people with obsessive thoughts and compulsions experience that their OCD, anxiety and depressive symptoms worsen during a crisis such as COVID-19
Trauma and stress can trigger or worsen OCD. Researchers already know this. They have also shown us that COVID-19 may be associated with adults developing psychiatric disorders. But we do not know much about what the corona crisis means for children and young people. A team of researchers from Aarhus University and the Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Central Denmark Region, therefore decided to examine how children and young people with OCD experience the crisis.
Aarhus University - 11/9/2020


Depression, social anxiety, and use of mobile dating apps
Depression symptoms and social anxiety are associated with greater use of mobile dating applications among women. The extent to which these are associated with dating app use is reported in the peer-reviewed journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. Click here to read the article now. "With increased symptoms of social anxiety and depression, women may be even more likely to turn to technology for social connection, especially if alternative forms of social contact are ...
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News - 11/2/2020


Good mental health and better sleep for the physically active: Active individuals have exercised more during the coronavirus pandemic, with positive results
In the middle of the pandemic this spring, researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) conducted a survey among members of Kondis, a Norwegian fitness training organization. Since this survey was sent out in the middle of the lockdown in Norway, participants were asked whether they had changed their exercise habits as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of these initial analyses was to map mental health and sleep problems, and to investigate ...
Norwegian University of Science and Technology - 10/28/2020


Postpartum depression may persist three years after giving birth: NIH study suggests women with mood disorders, gestational diabetes may have a higher risk
A National Institutes of Health study of 5,000 women has found that approximately 1 in 4 experienced high levels of depressive symptoms at some point in the three years after giving birth. The rest of the women experienced low levels of depression throughout the three-year span. The study was conducted by researchers at NIH's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). It appears in the journal Pediatrics.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development - 10/27/2020


PTSD and alcohol abuse go hand-in-hand, but males and females exhibit symptoms differently
Through intricate experiments designed to account for sex-specific differences, scientists at Scripps Research have collaborated to zero in on certain changes in the brain that may be responsible for driving alcohol abuse among people with post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. In studies with rodents, researchers found that males and females exhibit their own distinct symptoms and brain features of PTSD and alcohol use disorder. Such differences are not typically accounted for in ...
Scripps Research Institute - 10/23/2020


Increasing sleep time after trauma could ease ill effects, study says
Increasing the amount of time spent asleep immediately after a traumatic experience may ease any negative consequences, suggests a new study conducted by researchers at Washington State University's Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine. Published today in Scientific Reports, the study helps build a case for the use of sleep therapeutics following trauma exposure, said William Vanderheyden, an assistant research professor and the lead author on the study. "Basically, our study has ...
Washington State University - 10/22/2020


COVID-19 anxiety linked to body image issues: Study finds association between stress and anxiety, and negative body image
A new study has found that anxiety and stress directly linked to COVID-19 could be causing a number of body image issues amongst women and men. The research, led by Professor Viren Swami of Anglia Ruskin University (ARU) and published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, involved 506 UK adults with an average age of 34. Amongst women, the study found that feelings of anxiety and stress caused by COVID-19 were associated with a greater desire for thinness. It also ...
Anglia Ruskin University - 10/22/2020


The mental health impact of pandemics for front line health care staff
Mental health problems such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, anxiety and depression are common among healthcare staff during and immediately after pandemics - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. Researchers investigated how treating patients in past pandemics such as SARS and MERS affected the mental health of front-line staff. They found that almost a quarter of health-care workers (23.4 per cent) experienced PTSD symptoms during the most intense ...
University of East Anglia - 10/16/2020


High fructose intake may drive aggressive behaviors, ADHD, bipolar: New peer-review paper looks at evolution and current Western diet to help explain manic behaviors
New research suggests that conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity syndrome (ADHD), bipolar disorder, and even aggressive behaviors may be linked with sugar intake, and that it may have an evolutionary basis. The research, out today from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and published in Evolution and Human Behavior, presents a hypothesis supporting a role for fructose, a component of sugar and high fructose corn syrup, and uric acid (a fructose metabolite), in ...
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus - 10/16/2020


Study links eating disorders with body dysmorphia: Research finds rate of body dysmorphia is 12 times higher among gymgoers with eating issues
People with eating disorders are 12 times more likely to be preoccupied with perceived flaws in their physical appearance than those without, according to new research published in the journal Eating and Weight Disorders. Researchers from Anglia Ruskin University (ARU) surveyed more than 1,600 health club members recruited via social media. They found the number of people with body dysmorphic disorder - a mental condition marked by obsession with perceived flaws in appearance ...
Anglia Ruskin University - 10/13/2020


Watching nature on TV can boost wellbeing, finds new study
Watching high quality nature programmes on TV can uplift people's moods, reduce negative emotions, and help alleviate the kind of boredom associated with being isolated indoors, according to a new study published today in the Journal of Environmental Psychology. The research has also shown that experiencing nature in virtual reality could have even larger benefits, boosting positive feelings and increasing people's connection to the natural world.
University of Exeter - 10/13/2020


Factors that increase or decrease suicidal behavior risk in adolescents
An analysis of relevant studies published to date has identified certain risk factors associated with suicidal behavior in adolescents. The analysis also revealed certain protective factors that may reduce the likelihood of suicidal behavior. The analysis, which is published in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, included 66 studies. Internal risk factors included poor individual coping, smartphone abuse, nutritional imbalance, menstrual problems, poor lifestyle, and ...
Wiley - 10/7/2020


Teens diagnosed with depression show reduction in educational achievement:
Teenagers who receive a depression diagnosis during their school career show a substantial decline in attainment in Year 11, new King's College London research has found. The researchers suggest that targeted educational support for children struggling with depression might particularly benefit boys and those from deprived backgrounds, who were especially vulnerable subgroups in this study, although all children with depression might benefit from such support.
NIHR Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre - 10/7/2020


'Brain fog' following COVID-19 recovery may indicate PTSD: Psychiatric disorders and brain damage can share similar symptoms but require different treatments
A new report suggests that lingering "brain fog" and other neurological symptoms after COVID -19 recovery may be due to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), an effect observed in past human coronavirus outbreaks such as SARS and MERS. People who have recovered from COVID-19 sometimes experience lingering difficulties in concentration, as well as headaches, anxiety, fatigue or sleep disruptions. Patients may fear that the infection has permanently damaged their brains, ...
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences - 10/6/2020


Indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic coincide with a heavy mental health burden
The COVID-19 pandemic is taking a heavy mental health toll even on people who are not directly impacted by the disease, shows a new study in Frontiers in Psychiatry. In a first-of-its-kind Australian mental health survey, researchers found that people in countries with low rates of infection and fatalities--like Australia at the onset of the pandemic--still experience twice as much depression and anxiety. These outcomes are largely related to financial stress and disruptions to people's ...
Frontiers - 10/6/2020


New clues about the link between stress and depression
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a protein in the brain that is important both for the function of the mood-regulating substance serotonin and for the release of stress hormones, at least in mice. The findings, which are published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, may have implications for the development of new drugs for depression and anxiety. After experiencing trauma or severe stress, some people develop an abnormal stress response or chronic stress.
Karolinska Institutet - 10/2/2020


University of Ottawa study finds self-harm may be socially contagious among adolescents
A new study led by University of Ottawa epidemiologist Dr. Ian Colman suggests non-suicidal self-injury--behaviours like cutting oneself without the intent to die--may be contagious among teenagers, who are more likely to harm themselves when they know someone who has. The study, titled 'Adolescents' knowledge of a peer's non-suicidal self-injury and own non?suicidal self?injury and suicidality' and published in the peer-reviewed journal Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, uses 2014 ...
University of Ottawa - 10/1/2020


Internet gaming youth not more prone to psychiatric disorders: Some passionate gamers may even be less anxious than their non-gaming peers
Many of our children play a lot of computer games. Some youth play so much and develop such big problems that a new diagnosis called Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) has been proposed. Symptoms of a gaming disorder include that it has an impact on school, work or friendships, that we continue to play even though we know it creates problems, that we are unable to stop or reduce the activity, we lose interest in other activities and that we lie about how much we play.
Norwegian University of Science and Technology - 10/1/2020


Greater father involvement in infant parenting is beneficial for paternal mental health
A father's involvement in the parenting of an infant is associated to a lower risk of experiencing paternal depressive symptoms during the first year of the child's life, according to a study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Psychiatry. The investigators in the larger study conducted home interviews with 881 low-income ethnically and racially diverse fathers from 5 different sites in the US, one month after the birth of a child and controlling for social and demographic ...
Frontiers - 9/23/2020


Predicting therapeutic response in depressed teen girls: Brain activity signals show who may benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy
The risk of developing major depressive disorder (MDD) surges during adolescence-particularly for girls. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be an effective treatment, but only about half of girls diagnosed with depression show significant improvement. Researchers at Harvard Medical School and McLean Hospital have now identified a non-invasive test of brain function that could help predict who will respond to CBT.
Elsevier - 9/16/2020


Systematic parental training helps the well-being of preschool children with ADHD
Research findings from Aarhus University and the Central Denmark Region's Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Centre show that quality of life is poorer for preschool children with ADHD compared to children from the control population. But the children's quality of life can be significantly improved using treatment without medication. Hyperactivity, difficulty concentrating, impulsive behaviour and problems adapting to the social ground rules. These are some of the areas in which children with ...
Aarhus University - 9/16/2020


PTSD may double risk of dementia
People who have experienced post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are up to twice as likely to develop dementia later in life, according to a new study by UCL researchers. The research, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, is the first meta-analysis of global evidence on PTSD and dementia risk. For the study, the researchers analysed findings from 13 studies conducted on four continents, including data from a total of 1,693,678 people, investigating whether a PTSD diagnosis was ...
University College London - 9/15/2020


Loneliness doubled among older adults in first months of COVID-19, poll shows: Lack of social interaction or companionship is more common among those with health issues, but neighbors, healthy habits and technology may help
Staying close to home and avoiding crowded places can help older adults reduce their risk of COVID-19. But a new national poll suggests it comes with a cost, especially for those with health challenges. In June of this year, 56% of people over the age of 50 said they sometimes or often felt isolated from others - more than double the 27% who felt that way in a similar poll in 2018. Nearly half of those polled in June of this year also said they felt more isolated than they had just before ...
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan - 9/14/2020


Certain coping strategies can help offset pandemic's mental health hits
The early days of the COVID-19 pandemic contributed to negative mental health effects for many in the U.S., according to new Penn State research. But the researchers also found that some coping techniques -- like wearing masks and focusing on self-care -- were linked with positive mental health. Erina MacGeorge, professor of communication arts and sciences, said the results -- recently published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health -- may give clues ...
Penn State - 9/14/2020


Better stress management is beneficial to newborns
A group of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been able to show that maternal psychological wellbeing during pregnancy has a positive effect on newborn infants. Increased telomere length suggests a reduced rate of cell aging, which could have an effect on children's future health. Results from this study have been published in the American Journal of Psychiatry*. A variety of pregnancy-related factors can have an impact on child development. Until now, researchers ...
Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin - 9/11/2020


Pregnant women's psychological health during the COVID-19 outbreak
A recent study that examined the psychological health of pregnant women during the COVID-19 outbreak uncovered fear and depression in many participants. The findings are published in the Journal of Clinical Nursing. In an online questionnaire completed in February 2020 by 331 pregnant women in China without COVID-19, participants were mostly worried about the following: "potential infected people were unprotected and non-isolated," "self-infection could affect the health of their ...
Wiley - 9/10/2020


Weight stigma predicts emotional distress and binge eating during COVID-19: Young adults who have experienced weight stigma have more distress and maladaptive eating behaviors during the pandemic, regardless of their body size
Hartford, CT - Links between obesity and complications of COVID-19 have received increasing attention throughout the ongoing pandemic. But a different aspect of body weight - the social stigma that people face because of their weight - may also have harmful implications for people's health during the pandemic. New research from the UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity and the University of Minnesota shows that young adults who experienced weight stigma before the ...
UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity - 9/10/2020


People with anorexia and body dysmorphic disorder show brain similarities, differences: Key patterns of brain function are more pronounced with more severe symptoms
A new UCLA study shows partially overlapping patterns of brain function in people with anorexia nervosa and those with body dysmorphic disorder, a related psychiatric condition characterized by misperception that particular physical characteristics are defective. The study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Brain Imaging and Behavior, found that abnormalities in brain function are related to severity of symptoms in both disorders, and may be useful in developing new treatment methods.
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences - 9/8/2020


COVID-stress may be hard to beat even with exercise
Exercise has been shown to reduce anxiety and stress, but it may not be enough for the levels caused by COVID-19. In a study of twins led by Washington State University researchers, people who reported increasing their physical activity after the start of COVID-19 stay-at-home orders reported higher levels of stress and anxiety than those whose activity levels stayed the same. In the study, published recently in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers analyzed data from over 900 pairs of identical ...
Washington State University - 9/8/2020


Early identification and treatment key in responding to COVID-19 health anxiety among children
Bath clinical psychologists have published advice for practitioners on responding to health anxieties among children and young people resulting from COVID-19. Early identification and treatment is vital to avoid long-term mental health consequences from COVID-19 among children and young people, say researchers. The psychologists from the University of Bath highlight how health anxieties can be triggered by changes like returning to school and argue that young people need time to ...
University of Bath - 9/4/2020


How we sleep today may forecast when Alzheimer's disease begins: Don't despair. deep, restorative sleep may defend against this virulent form of dementia
What would you do if you knew how long you had until Alzheimer’s disease set in? Don’t despair. New UC Berkeley research suggests one defense against this virulent form of dementia — for which no treatment currently exists — is deep, restorative sleep, and plenty of it. Neuroscientists Matthew Walker and Joseph Winer have found a way to estimate, with some degree of accuracy, a time frame for when Alzheimer’s is most likely to strike in a person’s lifetime. “We have found that the ...
University of California - Berkeley - 9/3/2020


How screen time and green time may affect youth psychological outcomes
Less screen time and more green time are associated with better psychological outcomes among children and adolescents, according to a study published September 4 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tassia Oswald of the University of Adelaide, and colleagues. The prevalence of mental illness among children and adolescents is increasing globally. Technological developments in recent decades have increased young people's engagement with screen-based technologies ...
PLOS - 9/3/2020


Can't be away from your phone? Study finds link to higher levels of obsession-compulsion
Feelings of panic when a person is away from their smartphone could be connected to general feelings of inadequacy and inferiority, a new study of young people in Portugal suggests. The study, published in the most recent issue of the journal Computers in Human Behavior Reports, found that gender has no bearing on whether people will feel apprehensive or anxious without their phones. But people who feel that way tend to be more anxious and obsessive-compulsive in their day-to-day ...
Ohio State University - 8/28/2020



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