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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
Page:   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25    Next Page  »
Brains work in sync during music therapy -- study
For the first time researchers have been able to demonstrate that the brains of a patient and therapist become synchronised during a music therapy session, a breakthrough that could improve future interactions between patients and therapists. The research, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, was carried out by Professor Jorg Fachner and Dr Clemens Maidhof of Anglia Ruskin University (ARU). This is the first music therapy study to use a procedure called hyperscanning, ...
Anglia Ruskin University - 7/25/2019


Hair could be the key to better mental-illness diagnosis in teens: Study also finds lower depression risk in kids with good family support
It's possible that a lock of hair could one day aid in the diagnosis of depression and in efforts to monitor the effects of treatment, said the author of a new study examining cortisol levels in the hair of teens. Researchers looked for potential relationships between the concentration of the stress hormone cortisol in the hair and adolescents' depression symptoms and found a surprising connection. Not only did high cortisol levels correspond to a higher likelihood of depression, but ...
Ohio State University - 7/24/2019


New research has potential for 'unpacking' complex simultaneous emotions in adolescence
When faced with emotional challenges or traumatic experiences, we may well have different, mixed feelings both at the same time and sequentially. In adolescence, when complex emotions are experienced as part of everyday life, the effect of challenge or trauma combined with difficulty expressing emotional complexity can exacerbate a given situation and limit the communication needed between young people and professionals. New research published (23rd July 2019) in the Journal ...
University of Chichester - 7/24/2019


Obstructive sleep apnea may be one reason depression treatment doesn't work
When someone is depressed and having suicidal thoughts or their depression treatment just isn't working, their caregivers might want to check to see if they have obstructive sleep apnea, investigators say. That's true even when these individuals don't seem to fit the usual profile of obstructive sleep apnea, which includes males who are overweight, snore and complain of daytime sleepiness, says Dr. W. Vaughn McCall, chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior at ...
Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University - 7/23/2019


Presence of hoarding symptoms does not negatively impact CBT response in youth with OCD
Hoarding can often be a debilitating problem for adults and is often associated with poorer mental health functioning and response to treatment. For children however, that may not be the case. A new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reveals that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) can be successful for youth with hoarding symptoms.
Elsevier - 7/23/2019


Scholars weigh in on new ideas about autism: Authors of provocative paper about social engagement reply to commentaries
A new paper that challenges widely held ideas about autism has attracted comments from more than 30 scholars across the disciplines of psychology, anthropology, education, and neuroscience. The authors maintain that many of the behaviors common to autism--including low eye contact, repetitive movements, and the verbatim repetition of words and phrases--are misinterpreted as a lack of interest in social engagement. On the contrary, they say, many people with autism express ...
University of California - Santa Cruz - 7/23/2019


School readiness impaired in preschoolers with ADHD symptoms, Stanford study finds
Preschoolers with symptoms of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are much less likely than other children their age to be ready for school, new research from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found. The study, which will be published online July 21 in Pediatrics, is among the first to comprehensively examine school readiness in young children with ADHD. Several previous studies have addressed academic difficulties in school-aged children with ADHD, but few studies ...
Stanford Medicine - 7/22/2019


Study: Brain injury common in domestic violence - Advocates say lasting 'invisible' injuries often go unrecognized
Domestic violence survivors commonly suffer repeated blows to the head and strangulation, trauma that has lasting effects that should be widely recognized by advocates, health care providers, law enforcement and others who are in a position to help, according to the authors of a new study. In the first community-based study of its kind, researchers from The Ohio State University and the Ohio Domestic Violence Network found that 81 percent of women who have been abused at the ...
Ohio State University - 7/2/2019


Genetic variation linked to response to anxiety could inform personalised therapies
A new study in marmoset monkeys suggests that individual variation in genes alters our ability to regulate emotions, providing new insights that could help in the development of personalised therapies to tackle anxiety and depression. Some individuals are at greater risk of developing anxiety and depression than others and this depends in part upon the interaction between our genes and our environment, such as stressful or adverse events in our lives. Moreover, some of those who ...
University of Cambridge - 7/2/2019


Some children are more likely to suffer depression long after being bullied
Some young adults who were bullied as a child could have a greater risk of ongoing depression due to a mix of genetic and environmental factors according to a new study from the University of Bristol. Researchers wanted to find out what factors influenced depression in young adults between the ages of 10 and 24 and why some people responded differently to risk factors such as bullying, maternal postnatal depression, early childhood anxiety and domestic violence.
University of Bristol - 7/1/2019


Early warning signs of eating disorder revealed: Findings of large-scale data study
Early warning signs that someone may have an eating disorder have been revealed in a large-scale data study conducted by Swansea University researchers. The results, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry by the Royal College of Psychiatrists, showed that people diagnosed with a disorder had higher rates of other conditions and of prescriptions in the years before their diagnosis. The findings may give GPs a better chance of detecting eating disorders earlier.
Swansea University - 6/30/2019


Teens who can describe negative emotions can stave off depression
Teenagers who can describe their negative emotions in precise and nuanced ways are better protected against depression than their peers who can’t. That’s the conclusion of a new study about negative emotion differentiation, or NED, the ability to make fine-grained distinctions between negative emotions and apply precise labels, published in the journal Emotion. “Adolescents who use more granular terms such as ‘I feel annoyed,’ or ‘I feel frustrated,’ or ‘I feel ashamed’—instead of ...
University of Rochester - 6/28/2019


Study: Society pays heavy price for failure to diagnose and treat conduct disorder
Conduct disorder is a common and highly impairing psychiatric disorder that usually emerges in childhood or adolescence and is characterized by severe antisocial and aggressive behavior, including physical aggression, theft, property damage and violation of others' rights. Much greater awareness, improved diagnosis and enhanced treatment are all required in order to reduce the burden on society of the severe behavioral condition, conduct disorder, according to a new study co-authored by ...
Louisiana State University - 6/28/2019


Understanding how tics are suppressed may help some at risk for tic disorders: Identifying kids who control their tics may help others at risk for Tourette syndrome
At least 20 percent of elementary school-age children develop tics such as excessive blinking, throat clearing or sniffing, but for most of those kids, the tics don't become a long-term problem. Conventional wisdom has held that most tics go away on their own and that only in rare cases do they become chronic or develop into a disorder such as Tourette syndrome. However, studying children shortly after tics first appear, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis ...
Washington University School of Medicine - 6/26/2019


Gender affects the correlation between depression and weight in children and adolescents
The results of a large community-based study have shown that the probability of major depressive disorder in children and adolescents with high, low, or normal body mass index differs according to gender. Underweight boys and overweight girls have an increased risk of depression, according to the study published in Childhood Obesity, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the full-text article free on the Childhood Obesity website through ...
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News - 6/13/2019


Weighing risks and benefits of drug treatment for major depression: Research summary from the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Depression is a common and serious problem for older adults. Some 15 to 20 percent of people aged 65 and older who live independently deal with symptoms of major depressive disorder. For residents of nursing homes, the rates of depression may be as high as 50 percent. For some people, medication is an effective part of treatment for depression. However, when considering whether to prescribe antidepressant medication for older adults, healthcare providers must weigh the ...
American Geriatrics Society - 6/12/2019


Parents of depressed teens in treatment may also benefit from counseling: Family relationships were stable while teen was in treatment; marital satisfaction worsened post-treatment
Teen depression can affect parents' marital satisfaction, a new Northwestern Medicine study has found. Parents often seek mental health treatment for a child struggling with depression, but the treatment shouldn’t stop with the depressed teen, suggests the study. The study found that while depressed teens were involved in active treatment, parents’ marriages and parent-child conflict remained stable. Once the teens’ treatment had finished, however, parents’ marital relationships ...
Northwestern University - 6/6/2019


Weak upper and lower body physical performance associated with depression and anxiety: New study confirms elevated depressive and/or anxiety symptoms in midlife women with limited physical strength and activity
Physical fitness is associated with a number of key health outcomes, including heart disease, cognition, mortality, and an overall feeling of well-being. A new study from Singapore now links physical performance with mental health and emotions, suggesting that weak upper and lower body fitness can cause more serious depression and anxiety in midlife women. Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).
The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) - 6/5/2019


Is 'clean eating' just dirty rhetoric? New research on 'clean eating' explores potential link to eating disorders
New research published today in the Journal of Eating Disorders finds "clean eating" is perceived as overwhelmingly positive by young people, but those optimistic impressions of "clean diets" may signal a risk for eating disorders. Scientists are also calling for additional research to better understand the nature of the "clean eating" diet fad.
Dickinson College - 6/3/2019


Can Cannabinoids Help Treat Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder?
The body’s endocannabinoid system, due to the critical role it plays in regulating neurotransmitter signaling, is an enticing target for drug development against disorders associated with anxiety, stress, and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). A comprehensive new review article that provides an overview of this complex system, endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids, results of animal studies and human trials to date, and recommendations for ...
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News - 5/31/2019


Children who nap are happier, excel academically, and have fewer behavioral problems
Ask just about any parent whether napping has benefits and you'll likely hear a resounding "yes," particularly for the child's mood, energy levels, and school performance. New research from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of California, Irvine, published in the journal SLEEP backs up that parental insight. A study of nearly 3,000 fourth, fifth, and sixth graders ages 10-12 revealed a connection between midday napping and greater happiness, self-control, and grit; fewer ...
University of Pennsylvania - 5/31/2019


Depression sufferers at risk of multiple chronic diseases
Women who experience symptoms of depression are at risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, research led by The University of Queensland has found. UQ School of Public Health PhD scholar Xiaolin Xu said women who experienced symptoms of depression, even without a clinical diagnosis, were at risk of developing multiple chronic diseases. "These days, many people suffer from multiple chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke and cancer," Mr Xu said.
University of Queensland - 5/30/2019


'Ecstasy' shows promise for post-traumatic stress treatment: Psychotherapy and medication proves helpful for chronic sufferers
An international study involving researchers from UBC Okanagan has shown that MDMA, also known as ecstasy, may be a valuable tool for treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Published recently in Psychopharmacology, the study demonstrated substantial improvements in individuals who had not responded to prior treatments, explains UBCO Associate Professor of psychology Zach Walsh. This is also, he adds, the most comprehensive evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of ...
University of British Columbia Okanagan campus - 5/29/2019


When drug treatment for social anxiety is insufficient: TALK THERAPY effectively works in the long run
A Japanese study group clarified that cognitive therapy* maintained its effects more than a year after the end of therapy for patients with a social anxiety disorder (SAD) even for those who did not respond to antidepressant drugs. The study was published online in the journal Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics* on May 23, 2019. The experiment was led by two experts on cognitive therapy in Japan, Dr. Naoki Yoshinaga, lecturer at University of Miyazaki, and Dr. Eiji Shimizu, professor at ...
University of Miyazaki - 5/28/2019


Self-harm images on Instagram associated with subsequent self-harm in viewers
Research has documented the widespread availability of graphic images of self-harm, such as cuttings, on the photo-sharing platform Instagram. After a British father said his 14-year-old daughter had viewed such explicit images on Instagram prior to her suicide, the platform announced that it would no longer allow such graphic images to appear. But little is known about how often such graphic images reach Instagram's users and whether they have an effect on viewers.
Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania - 5/28/2019


Study shows people fail to recognise male postnatal depression: New research led by Anglia Ruskin University shows significant gender differences
A new study shows that people are almost twice as likely to correctly identify signs of postnatal depression in women than in men. The research, published in the Journal of Mental Health and led by Professor Viren Swami of Anglia Ruskin University, involved 406 British adults aged between 18 and 70. The participants were presented with case studies of a man and a woman both displaying symptoms of postnatal depression, a mental health issue which affects as many as 13% of new parents.
Anglia Ruskin University - 5/13/2019


Anger more harmful to health of older adults than sadness: Associated with increased inflammation, which can lead to chronic disease, study says
Anger may be more harmful to an older person's physical health than sadness, potentially increasing inflammation, which is associated with such chronic illnesses as heart disease, arthritis and cancer, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. "As most people age, they simply cannot do the activities they once did, or they may experience the loss of a spouse or a decline in their physical mobility and they can become angry," said Meaghan A. Barlow, MA, ...
American Psychological Association - 5/9/2019


For teens, online bullying worsens sleep and depression: Nearly 15 percent of high school students report being bullied online
Teens who experience cyberbullying are more likely to suffer from poor sleep, which in turn raises levels of depression, found a University at Buffalo study. Although research has examined the relationship between online bullying and depression, the UB study is one of few to explore the connection between cyber victimization and sleep quality. The study surveyed more than 800 adolescents for sleep quality, cyber aggression and depression.
University at Buffalo - 5/9/2019


Stress in early life could make people more likely to develop depression
New research by the University of Bristol has found that early life adversity could make an individual more at risk of developing negative thinking, which could lead to major depressive disorder (MDD). The findings provide biological and psychological evidence to support work first proposed in the 1960s.
University of Bristol - 5/8/2019


A moody gut often accompanies depression -- new study helps explain why
For people with depression, gastrointestinal distress is a common additional burden, and a new study suggests that for some, the two conditions arise from the same glitch in neuron chemistry--low serotonin. The study, conducted in mice, shows that a shortage of serotonin in the neurons of the gut can cause constipation, just as a serotonin shortage in the brain can lead to depression. The study also found that a treatment that raises serotonin in the gut and the brain may alleviate both ...
Columbia University Irving Medical Center - 5/7/2019


Perseverance toward life goals can fend off depression, anxiety, panic disorders: Looking on the bright side also acts as a safeguard, according to 18-year study
People who don't give up on their goals (or who get better over time at not giving up on their goals) and who have a positive outlook appear to have less anxiety and depression and fewer panic attacks, according to a study of thousands of Americans over the course of 18 years. Surprisingly, a sense of control did not have an effect on the mental health of participants across time.
American Psychological Association - 5/2/2019


Adverse events during first years of life may have greatest effect on future mental health
A Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) study has found evidence that children under 3 years old are most the vulnerable to the effects of adversity - experiences including poverty, family and financial instability, and abuse - on their epigenetic profiles, chemical tags that alter gene expression and may have consequences for future mental health. Their report appearing in the May 15 issue of Biological Psychiatry, which has been published online, finds that the timing of adverse experiences ...
Massachusetts General Hospital - 5/1/2019


Haunted by the past: Insomniacs unable to get emotional distress off their mind
Cringe-worthy mistakes and embarrassing blunders made today won't seem so bad tomorrow. That is, unless you're an insomniac, research at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience shows. The scientists asked participants to relive their most shameful experiences of decades ago while making MRI scans of their brain activity. While good sleepers literally settled those experiences in their head as neutralized memories, people with insomnia were not able to do so. This breakthrough ...
Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience - KNAW - 4/25/2019


Being too harsh on yourself could lead to OCD and anxiety: A correlation was found between strong feelings of responsibility and likelihood of developing OCD or GAD in American university students
A new study has found that people who reported intense feelings of responsibility were susceptible to developing Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) or Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) was published in the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy. "People with OCD [are] tortured by repeatedly occurring negative thinking and they take some strategy to prevent it... GAD is a very pervasive type of anxiety. [Patients] worry about everything." describes Associate Professor ...
Hiroshima University - 4/25/2019


‘13 Reasons Why’ and Young Adults’ Risk of Suicide
One of the most heavily watched and debated fictional portrayals of suicide in recent years was the Netflix series “13 Reasons Why,” which raised outcries about potential contagion stemming from its portrayal of a female high-school student’s suicide. Google searches about suicide spiked after the release of Season 1, physicians said that several children created lists of “13 reasons why” they wanted to kill themselves, and one hospital saw an increase in admissions of children who ...
Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania - 4/25/2019


Study confirms value of exposure therapy for vets with PTSD, alcohol problems
Prolonged exposure therapy is more effective at treating PTSD than Seeking Safety, a coping skills therapy, for patients who also have alcohol use disorder, found a VA San Diego Healthcare System study. The findings offer important guidance for clinicians in the VA health care system, which cares for many veterans coping with both PTSD and problem drinking. The researchers compared patients who were given integrated alcohol and prolonged exposure treatment with those given ...
Veterans Affairs Research Communications - 4/24/2019


Some women could be more susceptible to PTSD than others, according to new study
Childhood trauma is known to increase the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adulthood, especially for women, but the biological reasons for this correlation remain largely unknown. In a new study from the University of Missouri, researchers have proposed a solution to this mystery in the form of a model that could help psychiatrists better understand the far-reaching impacts of early trauma on women, while also clarifying why not all women with traumatic childhoods develop PTSD.
University of Missouri-Columbia - 4/23/2019


Brain wiring differences identified in children with conduct disorder
Behavioural problems in young people with severe antisocial behaviour - known as conduct disorder - could be caused by differences in the brain's wiring that link the brain's emotional centres together, according to new research led by the University of Birmingham. Conduct disorder affects around 1 in 20 children and teenagers and is one of the most common reasons for referral to child and adolescent mental health services. It is characterised by a wide range of antisocial or aggressive ...
University of Birmingham - 4/18/2019


Indicators of despair rising among Gen X-ers entering middle age
Indicators of despair--depression, suicidal ideation, drug use and alcohol abuse--are rising among Americans in their late 30s and early 40s across most demographic groups, according to new research led by Lauren Gaydosh, assistant professor of Medicine, Health and Society and Public Policy Studies at Vanderbilt University. These findings suggest that the increase in "deaths of despair" observed among low-educated middle-aged white Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964) in recent studies may ...
Vanderbilt University - 4/15/2019


People With a Sense of Oneness Experience Greater Life Satisfaction
People who believe in oneness — the idea that everything in the world is connected and interdependent — appear to have greater life satisfaction than those who don’t, regardless of whether they belong to a religion or don’t, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. “The feeling of being at one with a divine principle, life, the world, other people or even activities has been discussed in various religious traditions but also in a wide variety of scientific ...
American Psychological Association - 4/11/2019



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