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Mental Health News Archive

» Mental Health Library » Mental Health News Archive
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More preschool behavioural assessments improve predictions of aggression
The predictive significance of early childhood behaviors may have been underestimated by up to 50 per cent due to inadequate assessment procedures, a new study suggests.
ScienceDaily - 9/4/2014


40 percent of women with severe mental illness are victims of rape or attempted rape
Women with severe mental illness are up to five times more likely than the general population to be victims of sexual assault and two to three times more likely to suffer domestic violence, reveals new research led by UCL (University College London) and King's College London funded by the Medical Research Council and the Big Lottery.
EurekAlert - 9/3/2014


Childhood trauma could lead to adult obesity
Being subjected to abuse during childhood entails a markedly increased risk of developing obesity as an adult. This is the conclusion of a meta-analysis carried out on previous studies, which included a total of 112,000 participants. The analysis was conducted by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, and has been published in the journal Obesity Reviews.
Karolinska Institutet - 9/2/2014


Collaborative care intervention improves depression among teens
Among adolescents with depression seen in primary care, a collaborative care intervention that included patient and parent engagement and education resulted in greater improvement in depressive symptoms at 12 months than usual care, according to a study in the August 27 issue of JAMA.
EurekAlert - 8/26/2014


Even Normal-Weight Teens Can Have Dangerous Eating Disorders, Study Finds: Researchers saw a nearly 6-fold rise in patients who met all criteria of anorexia except being underweight
Teenagers do not need to be rail thin to be practicing the dangerous eating behaviors associated with anorexia, a new study suggests. Rather, the true measure of trouble may be significant weight loss, and the Australian researchers noted that a drastic drop in weight carries the same risk for life-threatening medical problems even if the patient is a normal weight. Even more concerning, the scientists saw a nearly sixfold increase in this type of patient during the six-year ...
HealthDay - 8/26/2014


Link between prenatal antidepressant exposure, autism risk called into question
Previous studies that have suggested an increased risk of autism among children of women who took antidepressants during pregnancy may actually reflect the known increased risk associated with severe maternal depression. Now researchers have called that into question with further studies -- and complex answers.
ScienceDaily - 8/26/2014


Obama tells veterans better mental health care on the way
President Barack Obama sought to make amends with veterans on Tuesday, announcing steps to expand their access to mental health care and an initiative with financial companies to lower home loan costs for military families. The president was embarrassed earlier this year when it was revealed that the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) had been covering up lengthy delays in providing healthcare to former military personnel.
Reuters - 8/26/2014


New research: Parents of anxious children can avoid the 'protection trap': Anxiety in kids one of the most common disorders
Parents naturally comfort their children when they are scared, but new research shows that some reactions may actually reinforce their children's feelings of anxiety. A new Arizona State University study shows that parents whose children suffer from anxiety often fall into the "protection trap" that may influence their child's behavior.
EurekAlert - 8/25/2014


Mindfulness-based depression therapy reduces health care visits
A mindfulness-based therapy for depression has the added benefit of reducing health-care visits among patients who often see their family doctors, according to a new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES).
EurekAlert - 8/21/2014


'Super-parent' cultural pressures can spur mental health conditions in new Moms and Dads
Mental health experts in the past three decades have emphasized the dangers of post-partum depression for mothers, but a University of Kansas researcher says expanding awareness of several other perinatal mental health conditions is important for all new parents, including fathers. This awareness has become even more critical as "super mom" and "super dad" pressures continue to grow ...
ScienceDaily - 8/18/2014


Are children who play violent video games at greater risk for depression?
While much attention has focused on the link between violent video game playing and aggression among youths, a new study finds significantly increased signs of depression among preteens with high daily exposure to violent video games.
EurekAlert - 8/18/2014


Disconnect between parenting and certain jobs a source of stress, study finds
Some working parents are carrying more psychological baggage than others — and the reason has nothing to do with demands on their time and energy. The cause is their occupation. According to University of Iowa researchers, parents who hold jobs viewed by society as aggressive, weak, or impersonal are likely to be more stressed out than parents whose occupations are seen in a light similar to parenting — good, strong, and caring.
EurekAlert - 8/16/2014


PTSD can develop even without memory of the trauma, study concludes
There are many forms of memory and only some of these may be critical for the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), reports a new study. The findings suggest that even with no explicit memory of an early childhood trauma, symptoms of PTSD can still develop in adulthood.
ScienceDaily - 8/14/2014


Involuntary Eye Movement a Foolproof Indication for ADHD Diagnosis: TAU Researchers develop diagnostic tool for the most commonly misdiagnosed disorder
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed -- and misdiagnosed -- behavioral disorder in American children. Now a new study can provide the objective tool medical professionals need to accurately diagnose ADHD. The study indicates that involuntary eye movements accurately reflect the presence of ADHD.
American Friends of Tel Aviv University - 8/13/2014


Mind and body: Scientists identify immune system link to mental illness
Children with high everyday levels of a protein released into the blood in response to infection are at greater risk of developing depression and psychosis in adulthood, according to new research which suggests a role for the immune system in mental illness.
EurekAlert - 8/13/2014


Robin Williams' Death Shines Light on Depression, Substance Abuse: Doctors say there are effective treatments for both disorders that can help many people
The suicide Monday of Academy Award-winning actor and comic star Robin Williams has refocused public attention on depression, its sometimes link to substance abuse and, in tragic cases, suicide. Williams was last seen alive at his suburban San Francisco home about 10 p.m. Sunday, according to the Marin County coroner's office. Shortly before noon on Monday, the Sheriff's Department received an emergency call from the home, where he was soon ...
HealthDay - 8/12/2014


ADHD, substance abuse and conduct disorder develop from the same neurocognitive deficits
The origins of ADHD, substance abuse and conduct disorder have been traced, and researcher have found that they develop from the same neurocognitive deficits, which in turn explains why they often occur together. The findings shed light on the cognitive deficits that could be targeted in order to potentially help treat comorbid cases (e.g. adolescents who have been diagnosed with both conduct disorder and substance use problems).
ScienceDaily - 8/12/2014


Anxiety and Amen: Prayer Doesn’t Ease Symptoms of Anxiety-Related Disorders for Everyone, Baylor Study Finds
Whether the problem is health, enemies, poverty or difficulty with aging, “Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there,” suggested the late gospel musician Charles A. Tindley. But when it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, prayer doesn’t have the same effect for everybody, according to Baylor University research. What seemed to matter more was the type of attachment the praying individual felt toward God.
Baylor University - 8/12/2014


Overhaul of our understanding of why autism potentially occurs
An analysis of autism research covering genetics, brain imaging, and cognition led by Laurent Mottron of the University of Montreal has overhauled our understanding of why autism potentially occurs, develops and results in a diversity of symptoms.
EurekAlert - 8/12/2014


Transgender relationships undermined by stigma
Researchers who looked at the impact of discrimination, poverty and stigma on the mental health and relationship quality of transgender women and their male romantic partners found that social and economic marginalization not only takes a psychological toll on each person individually but also appears to undermine them as a couple.
EurekAlert - 8/12/2014


Regular marijuana use bad for teens' brains
Frequent marijuana use can have a significant negative effect on the brains of teenagers and young adults, including cognitive decline, poor attention and memory, and decreased IQ, according to psychologists discussing public health implications of marijuana legalization at the American Psychological Association's 122nd Annual Convention.
EurekAlert - 8/9/2014


Aggressive behaviour increases adolescent drinking, depression doesn't
Adolescents who behave aggressively are more likely to drink alcohol and in larger quantities than their peers, according to a recent study completed in Finland. Depression and anxiety, on the other hand, were not linked to increased alcohol use. The study investigated the association between psychosocial problems and alcohol use among 4074 Finnish 13- to 18-year-old adolescents.
ScienceDaily - 8/6/2014


Coaching May Help Diabetics Battle Depression, Disease Better: Study found mental health sessions allowed patients to manage blood sugar levels more effectively
Mental health coaching may help diabetes patients with depression and with lowering their blood sugar levels, a new study suggests. Many people with diabetes suffer depression, which can interfere with their ability to manage their diabetes through monitoring blood sugar levels, being active, eating healthy and taking their medications, the researchers noted.
HealthDay - 8/6/2014


Marital tension between mom and dad can harm each parent’s bond with child, study finds
Children suffer when mom and dad have problems in their marriage, according to a new study. Dads, especially, let negative emotions and tension from their marriage spill over and harm the bond with their child, says psychologist and lead-author Chrystyna Kouros, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Conversely, moms in poor quality marriages sometimes compartmentalized marital tension and improved the relationship with their child. The findings indicate ...
Southern Methodist University - 8/5/2014


Brief counseling for drug use doesn't work, BU study finds
In an effort to stem substance use, the U.S. has invested heavily in the past decade in a brief screening-and-intervention protocol for alcohol and other drugs. But a new study by Boston University School of Public Health and School of Medicine researchers casts doubt on whether that approach, which has proven successful with risky alcohol use, works for illicit drugs.
EurekAlert - 8/5/2014


Anorexia Fueled by Pride About Weight Loss: Rutgers study finds that positive emotions could play a role in the deadly disorder
Positive emotions – even those viewed through a distorted lens – may play an exacerbating role in fueling eating disorders like anorexia nervosa, which has a death rate 12 times higher for females between the ages of 15 and 24 than all other causes of death combined, according to a Rutgers study.
Rutgers University - 8/4/2014


Phases of clinical depression could affect treatment
Research led by the University of Adelaide has resulted in new insights into clinical depression that demonstrate there cannot be a "one-size-fits-all" approach to treating the disease. As part of their findings, the researchers have developed a new model for clinical depression that takes into account the dynamic role of the immune system. This neuroimmune interaction results in different phases of depression, and has implications for current treatment practices.
EurekAlert - 8/4/2014


Researchers find potential new predictor of stress-related illnesses
Many scientists believe that the tendency to develop stress-related disorders is an inherited trait or is the result of exposure to traumatic events. In this paper in Nature, scientists, including Douglas Williamson, Ph.D., from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, explain that a new factor -- that genes may change over time -- could cause depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and other stress-related illnesses.
EurekAlert - 8/3/2014


Extra Exercise Could Help Depressed Smokers Quit: Withdrawal symptoms, cravings are harder on people with mood disorders, researchers say
Quitting smoking is harder for people with depression, according to a new review. Depression can make it more difficult to ride out the anxiety, cravings or lack of sleep that come with trying to quit cold turkey, scientists found. But extra exercise -- even just a walk -- could help people quit faster, they said.
HealthDay - 7/29/2014


'Interreality' may enhance stress therapies
Using virtual reality to add “real world” challenges to psychotherapy sessions may enhance the treatment’s effect for people learning to cope with workplace stress, according to a small study from Italy. Researchers say the hybrid therapy known as “interreality” was more effective than traditional cognitive behavioral therapy, which is currently considered the gold standard for more serious anxiety or post traumatic stress disorders.
Reuters - 7/29/2014


Computerized ADHD testing: Innovative tool helps with diagnosis/tracking in both children and adults
A new technology can now be utilized on patients called the Quotient® ADHD Test. t is FDA-cleared for the objective measurement of hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention, as an aid in the assessment of ADHD. ADHD is a common childhood condition characterized by more than normal difficulty with focus, behavior control, impulsivity and hyperactivity.
ScienceDaily - 7/25/2014


When it hurts to think we were made for each other
Psychologists observe that people talk and think about love in limitless ways but underlying such diversity are some common themes that frame how we think about relationships. For example, one popular frame considers love as perfect unity; in another frame, love is a journey. These two ways of thinking about relationships are particularly interesting because, according to a new study, they have the power to highlight or downplay the damaging effect of conflicts on ...
ScienceDaily - 7/24/2014


Background TV can be bad for kids
Leaving the television on can be detrimental to children's learning and development, according to a new study. Researchers found that background television can divert a child’s attention from play and learning. Regardless of family demographics, parenting can act as a buffer against the impacts of background TV, the research team found.
ScienceDaily - 7/24/2014


Wives with more education than their husbands no longer at increased risk of divorce
For decades, couples in which a wife had more education than her husband faced a higher risk of divorce than those in which a husband had more education, but a new study finds this is no longer the case. "Overall, our results speak against fears that women's growing educational advantage over men has had negative effects on marital stability," a co-author said. "Further, the findings provide an important counterpoint to claims that progress toward gender equality in ...
ScienceDaily - 7/24/2014


When it comes to depressed men in the military, does size matter?
Both short and tall men in the military are more at risk for depression than their uniformed colleagues of average height, a new study finds. This study was published today in the open access journal SAGE Open. Despite the researchers' original hypothesis that shorter men in the military would be more psychologically vulnerable than their taller counterparts, researchers Valery Krupnik and Mariya Cherkasova found that men both shorter and taller than average ...
EurekAlert - 7/23/2014


Controlling childbirth pain tied to lower depression risk: Severe pain during and post delivery linked to postpartum depression
Controlling pain during childbirth and post delivery is linked to reduced risk of postpartum depression, says a Northwestern perinatal psychiatrist, based on a new study. The study showed postpartum depression rates doubled for women without pain control. Significant numbers of women have acute and chronic pain related to childbirth and need to consult with their physician if pain continues for several months.
EurekAlert - 7/23/2014


Stress, depression may affect how the body processes fat
Stress and depression have long been linked with a heightened risk of weight gain, but a new study sheds light on how those mental states may alter the way the body processes fatty foods. Compared to women without stress in the study, stressed-out women burned both calories and fat more slowly for seven hours after eating the equivalent of an average fast-food burger meal. “Stress can promote weight gain by slowing your metabolism,” ...
Reuters - 7/16/2014


Poor sleep quality linked to lower physical activity in people with PTSD
A new study shows that worse sleep quality predicts lower physical activity in people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Results show that PTSD was independently associated with worse sleep quality at baseline, and participants with current PTSD at baseline had lower physical activity one year later. Further analysis found that sleep quality completely mediated the relationship between baseline PTSD status and physical activity at the one-year follow-up, ...
American Academy of Sleep Medicine - 7/16/2014


Eating disorders and depression in athletes: Does one lead to the other?
Sport is a proven contributor to high self-esteem, confidence, positive outlook and good health. It would be reasonable to assume then that athletes have higher than average protection from depression and dysfunctional eating? On the contrary, athletes are considered three times more likely to develop an eating disorder and there is strong empirical evidence linking eating disorders and depression. Previous research to determine causality between the ...
ScienceDaily - 7/15/2014


Study: Body Dysmorphic Disorder patients have higher risk of personal and appearance-based rejection sensitivity - Rejection sensitivities impact overall health and quality of life
In a recent study, researchers at Rhode Island Hospital found that fear of being rejected because of one's appearance, as well as rejection sensitivity to general interpersonal situations, were significantly elevated in individuals with Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD). These fears, referred to as personal rejection sensitivity and appearance-based rejection sensitivity, can lead to diminished quality of life and poorer mental and overall health.
EurekAlert - 7/15/2014



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